Get Involved: Support the Center

Scholarship Fund

Support wind engineering students through the William Heronemus Scholarship Fund (Using the pull-down menu under "Gift Allocation" select "College of Engineering" and then "William Heronemus Scholarship Fund.")

Collaboration

The Wind Energy Center actively solicits industrial, academic, and other stakeholder partners with whom to advance wind energy research and education.

If you are interested in exploring how partnering the Wind Energy Center could advance your organization’s mission, please contact the Center Director, James F. Manwell.

Funding Opportunities

Support Wind Energy research and education in two ways:

1. In-kind contributions of equipment and/or software have been critical to our ongoing research and to educating tomorrow’s wind energy engineers. If you wish to explore this opportunity, please contact the Center Director, James F. Manwell.

2. Financial contributions over the years have provided important support to students as well as to specialized research efforts. Please click here if you are interested in making a financial contribution to our research. (Using the pull-down menu under "Gift Allocation" select "College of Engineering" and then "Wind Energy Center.")

Vestas Scholars Turn Wind Scholarship into Windfall

hardhatTwo mechanical engineering students at the University of Massachusetts Amherst have literally taken advantage of a windfall from a prominent wind power company and used it to propel their futures. Jacque Heger and Samuel Deptula each received $5,000 scholarships for the 2008–2009 academic year from Vestas Americas, the leading supplier of wind power solutions with over 35,000 wind turbines installed. As part of this Vestas Scholarship Program, they also received $8,000 apiece this summer to do wind-related research for the Wind Energy Center at UMass Amherst. Heger used her research funding for making key physical improvements to wind turbine blades, while Deptula employed his Vestas support to help reboot a wind tunnel on campus that had been abandoned for more than a decade. Read more