Links
HFA - College of Humanities & Fine Arts view HFA submenu
Academics

Spring 2018 Courses

WGSS 201 – Gender and Difference:  Critical Analyses
Section 1 – Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.  Elizabeth Williams
Section 2 – Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.  Lezlie Frye
Section 3 – Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.  Elizabeth Williams

Introduction to the vibrant field of women, gender, and sexuality studies, this course familiarizes students with the basic concepts in the field and draws connections to the world in which we live. An interdisciplinary field grounded in commitment to both intellectual rigor and individual and social transformation, WGSS asks fundamental questions about the conceptual and material conditions of our lives. What are “gender,” “sexuality,” “race,” and “class? How are gender categories, in particular, constructed differently across social groups, nations, and historical periods? What are the connections between gender and socio-political categories such as race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, (dis)ability and others? How do power structures such as sexism, racism, heterosexism, and classism and others intersect? How can an understanding of gender and power enable us to act as agents of individual and social change? Emphasizing inquiry in transnational feminisms, critical race feminisms, and sexuality studies, this course examines gender within a broad nexus of identity categories, social positions, and power structures. Areas of focus may include queer and trans studies; feminist literatures and cultures; feminist science studies; reproductive politics; gender, labor and feminist economics, environmental and climate justice; the politics of desire, and others. Readings include a range of queer, feminist and women thinkers from around the world, reflecting diverse and interdisciplinary perspectives in the field.

WGSS 205 – Feminist Health Politics
Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Svati Shah

Distribution Requirement:  Sexuality Studies

What is health? What makes health a matter of feminism? d what might a feminist health politics look like? These questions lay at the heart of this course. In Feminist Health Politics, we will examine how health becomes defined, and will question whether health and disease are objectively measured conditions or subjective states. We will also consider why and how definitions and standards of health have changed over time; why and how standards and adjudications of health vary according to gender, race, sexuality, class, and nationality; and how definitions of health affect the way we value certain bodies and ways of living. Additionally, we will explore how knowledge about health is created; how environmental conditions, social location, politics, and economic conditions affect health; how various groups have fought for changes to health care practices and delivery; and how experiences of health and illness have been reported and represented.

WGSS 290C – History of Race and Sexuality in the U.S. (U, HS)
Monday, Wednesday  10:10-11:00
Kirsten Leng
Distribution Requirement:  Sexuality Studies, Critical Race Feminisms

This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary feminist study of sexuality. Its primary goal is to provide a forum for students to consider the history of sexuality and race in the U.S. both in terms of theoretical frameworks within women’s and gender studies, and in terms of a range of sites where those theoretical approaches become material, are negotiated, or are shifted. The course is a fully interdisciplinary innovation. It will emphasize the links rather than differences between theory and practice and between cultural, material, and historical approaches to the body, gender, and sexuality. Throughout the course we will consider contemporary sexual politics, from the science of sex and sexuality to marriage debates, in light of histories of racial and sexual formations.

WGSS 291V – Voices, Violence and Vantage Points:  Feminist Research Methods
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Stina Soderling

Feminists argue that it matters not only what we know, but how we come to know things. In this course, we will explore how feminists do research, as well as engage with already-existing information. Topics will include: Indigenous feminist research, lesbian history-writing, and feminist media campaigns such as #SayHerName and #MeToo. Throughout the course, we will look at how feminists use research in their activism; for the final project, students will complete a research project that can be used in social movements.

WGSS 292P/WGSS 692P – Feminist Perspectives on Indigeneity and Settler Colonialism
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Stina Soderling
Distribution Requirement:  Critical Race Feminisms

How is settler colonialism – the process of (violently) displacing Native populations and claiming land by a colonizing population – related to gender and sexuality? And how does it connect to, and differ from, other forms of coloniality and postcolonialism? This course will examine recent writings in Native feminism and settler-colonial studies, in conjunction with social movements' engagement (or lack thereof) with indigenous and gender justice and decolonization. We will pay attention to how feminist and queer theory has and has not engaged with Native Studies, and to points of contact between these theories and activist work. While the course will primarily focus on current and recent events, we will put these in historical context by engaging a longer history of activism and resitance. Movements studied in the course will include Idle No More, Occupy Wall Street, and the Standing Rock protest against the Dakota Access Pipeline. Readings will include works by Aileen Moreton-Robinson, Glen Coulthard, Audra Simpson, Linda Tuhiwai-Smith, Harsha Walia, Scott Lauria Morgensen, Eva Garroutte, and Mark Rifkin, as well as materials produced by social movements.

WGSS 295C – Career and Life Choices
Monday  2:30-4:10 p.m.
Karen Lederer

Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies teaches critical thinking skills. How can students use these skills to make informed career choices? How is it possible to engage in planning one’s career while conscious of the realities of race, gender, sexuality, and class in today’s economy? What are career options for students whose values include working for a better society? Is it possible to put together a balanced life and pay the bills besides? How can pressured college seniors, particularly activists, get all the career tasks they need to do done (resume writing, budgeting, researching career opportunities, networking, informational interviews) while finishing their college degree? Students will formulate their own career questions and choices. The first part of the semester is self awareness, articulating interests, skills and values. The second part of the semester focuses on workforce information, practical job search skills, and research on a possible field. Assignments include: self awareness exercises, informational interviews, budget, resume, cover letter, career research and more.  2 credits, mandatory pass/fail

WGSS 297S – Girls in the System:  Gender and Juvenile Justice
Tuesday, Thursday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
Adina Giannelli
Distribution Requirement:  Critical Race Feminisms

This 200-level, interdisciplinary seminar will consider the role of gender in the juvenile justice system, in the United States and transnationally. Drawing on sociological literature, social critiques, policy papers, case law, documentary film, personal narratives, and even fiction, we will learn about and reflect upon the issues experienced by girls in the system. Final assignment will be student-driven, in consultation with instructor. In the context of this course, we will critically examine the history of girls in the juvenile justice system; what it means to be in “the system”; the role of “justice” in the juvenile system; and the relationship between gender and justice. We will review some of the major issues faced by the girls who are subject to this system. Finally, we will explore the following questions: What are the goals of the juvenile justice system, and whose interests does it serve? Who is tracked into the system, and why? What is the relationship between race, gender, sexuality, culture and tracking, diversion, alternatives, and outcomes for girls in the juvenile justice system? How does the system address--or fail to address--issues of education, health, wellness, and community? And how do those who are subject to this system contest its confines, demonstrating voice, vision, and agency?

WGSS 297VW – Black Feminist and Green:  Black Women’s Natural World Writing
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Carlyn Ferrari
Distribution Requirement:  Critical Race Feminisms

This course will examine Black women's use of natural world imagery, and we will explore the place of the natural world in Black women's writing and Black feminist thought. Some of the writers we will consider include Anne Spencer, Edwidge Danticat, Dionne Brand, Zora Neale Hurston, Gwendolyn Brooks, and Alice Walker. This course will also provide students with a history of Black environmental thought through a Black feminist lens and explore the relationship between Black women's poetics and space, so we will also read selections from the works of Katherine McKittrick, Carolyn Finney, Dianne Glave, Kimberly Smith, Kimberly Ruffin, and others. Some of the questions we will consider include: Why do Black women writers utilize natural world imagery? What does it communicate about their lived experiences?

WGSS 392D – Global Gays in the Global Gaze:  Queer Histories and Geographies
Monday, Wednesday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
Elizabeth Williams
Distribution Requirement:  Sexuality Studies, Transnational Feminisms

In popular discourse, the LGBTQ rights movement is often framed as one long struggle from the dark old days of queer oppression to the triumph of queer rights as epitomized by gay marriage, gays in the military, and the visibility of LGBT celebrities. Such a discourse positions the here and now of the modern US as the most progressive time and place—a discourse that props up narratives of US exceptionalism while ignoring the continued marginality and violence faced by the most marginal queer and gender nonconforming folks. In this course, we will challenge this progress narrative by examining how same-sex love, gender nonconforming bodies, and the identities associated with them have been understood across time and space. Starting from the premise that culture shapes our understanding of gender, sex, and sexuality, we will explore the history of sexuality from the ancient world to the present day. By taking a global perspective, we will pay particular attention to how the contingencies of space and place affect experiences and identities. Get ready for a rip-roaring ride as we travel from the “stone maidens” of the Xing dynasty, to “mine-marriages” in 1930s South Africa, from the politics of contemporary lesbian cruise boats, to the curious preferences for tiny penises in ancient Greece. No previous experience will be required; puns will be encouraged.

WGSS 393R – Reading Gender Trouble
Monday, Wednesday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
Kevin Henderson
Distribution Requirement:  Sexuality Studies

This course provides an introduction to Judith Butler’s book Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity.  Gender Trouble is often treated as a singular text that forever changed the history of feminist theorizing.  This course does not take that view. We will, however, treat Gender Trouble as an important text that is embedded in long-standing debates within feminist theory as well as intervening in debates in psychoanalysis, sexuality studies, political theory, anthropology, and performance studies, to name just a few, and, in the process, informing feminist, queer, and trans activism.  The course provides conceptual building blocks leading up to a reading of Gender Trouble. We will explore terms such as ideology, discourse, reification, interpellation, mimesis, drag, ontology, iteration, citation, the phallus, Oedipus, performativity, and power.  Students will gain an understanding of the similarities and differences between and across a variety of authors that are trying to understand the nature of sex/sexuality/gender.  Through an active engagement in texts that informed the writing of Gender Trouble, students will be confident to read and discuss Butler’s text at the end of course.

WGSS 392J/692J – Feminisms and Environmental Justice
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Kiran Asher
Distribution Requirement:  Transnational Feminisms

While feminism and environmental justice are both political projects of social change, their objects or objectives are not the same. As we sink into the 21st century, amid looming fears of ecological catastrophes and socio-economic crises, is a conversation between these two projects likely to be productive for both struggles, or are their goals at odds with each other? This class will examine the perceived, existing, and potential links (or disjuncts) between feminism and environmental justice. Our interdisciplinary inquiry will be guided by questions such as: What is understood by the terms "feminism" and "environmental justice"? How have nature and the environment figured in feminist writings and feminist ideas of justice? Conversely, how do women and gender figure in ideas and struggles for environmental justice? Indeed, how do feminist ideals inform (or not) other struggles for social change (such as those of peasants, workers, ethnic groups, queer folk, and more)?

WGSS 393P – Pop Culture and Racial Icons
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Alexandrina Deschamps
Distribution Requirement:  Critical Race Feminisms

This course will be an exploration, analysis, and discussion of what meaning we attach to the images of racial political, social, and cultural figures. We will focus on how black womanhood has been historically and continues to be reconstructed through representations, images, as well as in our imagination. Nicole Fleetwood examines the currency of these images and asks, how do racial icons “signify”. We will read Tony Morrison’s Playing in the Dark; Nicole Fleetwoods, On Racial Icons, Blackness and the Public Imagination; thoroughly analyze Beyonce’s Lemonade; discuss other icons in sports, politics, pop culture, and social media (inter alia, the Venus Sisters, Laverne Cox, Janet Mock), and look closely at the Hottentot Venus and black female desire. Students will have the opportunity to tailor their assignments and projects with lots of flexibility keeping in the mind that this course is about intersectional analysis and must include at least race, gender, and sexuality.

WGSS 395N – Gender, Nation and Body Politics
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Amanda Johnson
Distribution Requirement:  Transnational Feminisms, Sexuality Studies

In this course, we will examine feminist theorizations, critiques, and accounts of gender and sexuality in the context of nation-state formations, colonization, globalization, and migration. We will interrogate how the gendered body becomes a target of violence, regulation, and objectification, but also functions as a site of resistance. We will also examine how the body serves as a marker of nation and identity, and a locus generating knowledge, both scientific and experiential. Some issues we will cover include racialization, labor, citizenship, heteronormativity, reproduction, schooling, and incarceration, as well as the role of anthropology and ethnography in both understanding and enacting political engagements with these issues.

WGSS 397TC – Transgender Politics and Critical Thought
Tuesday, Thursday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
Sonny Nordmarken
Distribution Requirement:  Sexuality Studies

Transgender studies is a new and rapidly-growing interdisciplinary field today. This course will examine both long-standing and recent political debates, critiques, and practices of resistance in the field, among scholars, activists, and artists. Investigating these issues, we will consider the following questions. How are trans and gender diverse individuals' lives implicated by interrelated regulatory regimes of gender, racism, colonization, neoliberal global capitalism, nationalism and homonationalism, ableism, medicalization, empire, state governmentality, and ideals of normative embodiment? How do cultural assumptions of sex as fixed and binary shape interpretive frames and thus policies, institutions, administrative systems and social practices that trans people must negotiate? What discursive processes produce, discipline, expel, and erase bodies, and which bodies do they expel and erase? What political debates animate trans and gender diverse communities in the U.S. and across global sites, in this historical moment? How are trans and gender diverse people resisting complex systems of oppression? Through active engagement, both in and outside of class, we will build a critical analytical framework around contemporary trans politics and theory. This is an advanced course requiring basic knowledge of transgender issues.

WGSS 494TI – Unthinking the Transnational (4 credits)
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Kiran Asher
Satisfies the Integrative Experience for BA-WoSt majors.  If not used for the IE, it can be used for the Transnational Feminisms distribution requirement.  

This course is about the framework of transnational women's and gendered activisms and scholarship. We will survey the field of transnational feminist research and praxis, locating structures of power, practices of resistance, and the geographies of development at work in a range of theories and social movements. The course will not only examine the implementation of feminist politics and projects that have sought to ensure some measurable social, cultural, and economic changes, but also explore the ways conceptions of the `global' and `transnational' have informed these efforts. Students will have the opportunity to assess which of these practices can be applicable, transferable, and/or travel on a global scale. We will focus not only on the agency of individuals, but also on the impact on people's lives and their communities as they adopt strategies to improve material, social, cultural, and political conditions of their lives. 

WGSS 691B – Issues in Feminist Research
Monday 2:30-5:00 p.m.
Laura Briggs

This is a graduate seminar in feminist research, and constitutes a core course for students enrolled in the Graduate Certificate Program in Advanced Feminist Research. Feminism has long been interested in a foundational way in questions of epistemology (how we know what we know) and research methodology (how we go about developing original research), because in its most recent incarnations, post-1968, it emerged as an academic formation that asked basic questions about disciplines: how did they invent a world without women? How was systemic bias built into its knowledge systems such that they made women, people of color, working class people, people outside the US and Europe (“the West,” as it came to be called, through an Orientalist bit of geographic folly), peasants, slaves, indigenous people, colonized people, (most) queers, trans folk and a great many others invisible? Obviously, in this endeavor feminists had help from many other fields and activist movements, which worked together across disciplines and movements to transform knowledge. In many ways, they won—no discipline or field of study is unchanged or untouched by these inquiries, although some are obviously more resistant than others. As this is a required course for graduate students enrolled in the Advanced Certificate in Advanced Feminist Studies, those students have priority for enrollment.  Please email lindah@wost.umass.edu to request enrollment in the course.  

WGSS 694D – Decolonialism, Sexuality and Gender
Tuesday  10:00-12:45 p.m.
Svati Shah

This seminar will generate an overview of the debates, scholarship, and politics of queer and transgender studies in Asia, Africa and Latin America. The visibility and rubric of ‘emergence’ with respect to LGBTQI (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and intersex) people, communities and politics in these ‘regions’ of the world have been accompanied by scholarship which is variously characterized as ‘decolonial’ and ‘postcolonial.’ The seminar will read through major works in order to specify where each term is used, by whom, and whether and how these terms reflect the complexities of queer and transgender scholarship and movement spaces in the non-Western world. Questions that these literatures raise include, but are not limited to: identitarianism, genealogies of queer and transgender politics, urbanization and migration, sexual commerce and sex work, nationalism and citizenship, indigeneity, legal campaigns against criminalization, access to health care, and informal economies.

WGSS 692J/392J – Feminisms and Environmental Justice
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Kiran Asher

While feminism and environmental justice are both political projects of social change, their objects or objectives are not the same. As we sink into the 21st century, amid looming fears of ecological catastrophes and socio-economic crises, is a conversation between these two projects likely to be productive for both struggles, or are their goals at odds with each other? This class will examine the perceived, existing, and potential links (or disjuncts) between feminism and environmental justice. Our interdisciplinary inquiry will be guided by questions such as: What is understood by the terms "feminism" and "environmental justice"? How have nature and the environment figured in feminist writings and feminist ideas of justice? Conversely, how do women and gender figure in ideas and struggles for environmental justice? Indeed, how do feminist ideals inform (or not) other struggles for social change (such as those of peasants, workers, ethnic groups, queer folk, and more)?

WGSS 693N – Native Feminisms and Settler Colonial Studies (cancelled)
Wednesday  2:30-5:00
Stina Soderling

How is settler colonialism – the process of (violently) displacing Native populations and claiming land by a colonizing population – related to gender and sexuality? And how does it connect to, and differ from, other forms of coloniality and postcolonialism? This course will examine recent writings in Native feminism and settler-colonial studies, in conjunction with social movements' engagement (or lack thereof) with indigenous and gender justice and decolonization. We will pay attention to how feminist and queer theory has and has not engaged with Native Studies, and to points of contact between these theories and activist work. While the course will primarily focus on current and recent events, we will put these in historical context by engaging a longer history of activism and resistance. Movements studied in the course will include Idle No More, Occupy Wall Street, and the Standing Rock protest against the Dakota Access Pipeline. Readings will include works by Aileen Moreton-Robinson, Glen Coulthard, Audra Simpson, Linda Tuhiwai-Smith, Harsha Walia, Scott Lauria Morgensen, Eva Garroutte, and Mark Rifkin, as well as materials produced by social movements. As a graduate seminar, this course will have significant student involvement and input, including facilitating part of class meetings.

UMASS Critical Race Feminisms Transnational Feminisms Sexuality Studies
WGSS 205 – Feminist Health Politics     X
WGSS 290C – History of Race and Sexuality in the U.S. (U, HS) X   X
WGSS 292P – Feminist Perspectives on Indigeneity and Settler Colonialism X    
WGSS 297S – Girls in the System:  Gender and Juvenile Justice X    
WGSS 297VW – Black Feminist and Green:  Black Women’s Natural World Writing X    
WGSS 392D – Global Gays in the Global Gaze:  Queer Histories and Geographies   X X
WGSS 393R – Reading Gender Trouble     X
WGSS 392J/692J – Feminisms and Environmental Justice   X  
WGSS 394P – Pop Culture and Racial Icons X    
WGSS 395N – Gender, Nation and Body Politics   X X
WGSS 397TC – Transgender Politics and Critical Thought     X
WGSS 494TI – Unthinking the Transnational (4 credits)*  (*Satisfies the Integrative Experience for BA-WoSt majors.  If not used for the IE, it can be used for the Transnational Feminisms distribution requirement)   X  
ENGLISH 300 – Junior Year Seminar in English Studies:  Gender and the African American Literary Imagination X    
ENGLISH 300 – Junior Year Seminar in English Studies:  The Queer Gothic     X
HISTORY 397RE – Race, Sex, and Empire:  Britain and India   X X
HISTORY 397D – Women and Colonial Rule in Africa   X  
HISTORY 397RR – History of Reproductive Rights Law     X
HISTORY 397SC – Sex and the Supreme Court     X
JAPANESE 391M/591M – Queer Japan in Literature and Culture     X
PSYCH 391ZZ – Psychology of the Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Experience     X
PUBHLTH 490J – Reproductive Justice     X
SOCIOL 287 – Sexuality and Society     X
AMHERST COLLEGE Critical Race Feminisms Transnational Feminisms Sexuality Studies
SWAG 220 – Queer Theory and Practice     X
SWAG 224/EUST 224/HIST 224 – The Century of Sex: Gender and Sexual Politics in Modern Europe   X X
SWAG 353/ANTH 353 – Transgender Ethnographies     X
SWAG 411/POSC 411 – Indigenous Women and World Politics   X  
ANTH 238 – Culture, Race and Reproductive Health X   X
BLST 446 - Radical Black Imagination X    
HAMPSHIRE COLLEGE Critical Race Feminisms Transnational Feminisms Sexuality Studies
CSI 165 – Gender and Economic Development   X  
CSI 222 – Race and the Queer Politics of the Prison State X   X
CSI 270 – Young Revolutionaries:  Race, Gender, and Narratives of Emerging Political Consciousness X    
MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE Critical Race Feminisms Transnational Feminisms Sexuality Studies
GNDST 204QT/ENGL 204QT – Queer and Trans Writing     X
GNDST 206AW/AFCNA 341EM – African Women’s Work   X  
GNDST 210SL/RELIG 207 – Women and Gender in Islam   X  
GNDST 221QF – Feminist and Queer Theory     X
GNDST 241HP/ANTHR 216HP – Feminist Health Politics     X
GNDST 333AX/CST 349AX – Making Waves: Gender and Sexuality in Asian America X    
GNDST 333FM/CST 249AE – Latina Feminisms X    
GNDST 333GG/HIST 301RG – Race, Gender and Empire:  Cultural Histories of the United States and the World   X  
GNDST 333LA/SPAN 330FA – Writing as Women: Female Autobiographical Writings in Latin America X    
GNDST 333PA/FLMST 380PA/SPAN 340PA – Natural’s Not in It:  Pedro Almodovar   X  
GNDST 333RT/RELIG 352/CST 349RE – Body and Gender in Religious Traditions     X
GNDST 333ST/CST 349ST – Sissies, Studs and Butches: Racialized Masculinites, Effeminacy and Embodiments of Noncompliance X   X
SMITH COLLEGE Critical Race Feminisms Transnational Feminisms Sexuality Studies
SWG 270 – Oral History and Lesbian Subjects     X
SWG 271 – Reproductive Justice     X
SWG 314 – Documenting Queer Lives     X
AFR 289 – Race, Feminism and Resistance in Movements for Social Change X    
AFR 366 – The Politics of Grief X    
ENG 299 – Turn Novels into Films:  Imperialisms, Race, Gender and Cinematic Adaption   X  
ENG 277 – Postcolonial Women Writers   X  
HST 209 – Women, Gender and Power in the Middle East   X  
HST 263 – Women and Gender in Latin America   X  
HST 278 – Decolonizing U.S. Women’s History 1848-Present X X  
HST 350 – Gender, Race and Fascism X    
HST 383 – Research in United States Women’s History:  Domestic Worker Organizing X    
SOC 213 – Race and National Identity in the United States X    
SOC 237 – Gender and Globalization   X  
SOC 253 – Sociology of Sexuality:  Institutions, Identities and Cultures     X
SOC 323 – Sexuality and Social Movements in Conservative Times     X
SOC 327 – Global Migration in the 21st Century   X  
SPN 332 – Islam in the West   X  

ECON 397GS/597GS/797GS – Gender, Sexuality, Work and Pay:   Empirical Perspectives
Tuesday  1:00-3:45 p.m.
Lee Badgett/Nancy Folbre

This course is designed to provide doctoral students, masters students, and advanced undergraduates an overview of the empirical research on gender and sexuality inequality in the labor market. We will draw primarily on empirical research that addresses theoretical predictions from economics and sociology, as well as research on policies designed to reduce inequality.  We will start with an overview of recent reviews of empirical research on gender inequality in the labor market in the U.S. and Europe, such as a recent piece by Blau and Kahn in the Journal of Economic Literature. We hope to include some consideration of gender and labor markets in developing countries as well. We will include the experimental literature on gendered differences and audit/study literature on discrimination. The course will include research on labor market discrimination against lesbian/gay/bi/trans individuals in various countries. We will also study research that uses the variation in gender composition of households to better understand the role of gender in shaping what families do and how they divide labor.  Another core issue addressed will be the "care penalty." Women who take time out from paid employment often experience a significant reduction in lifetime earnings, some of which may reflect discrimination, some of which may reflect technical characteristics of the job, such as scheduling inflexibility. Also, women who enter jobs in care industries and occupations (health and education) earn less, all else equal, than those in other jobs--particularly in professional and managerial positions.   We will include research on public policies that have had a significant effect on both care penalties. We are planning to invite some outside speakers to the class, to give it a kind of "workshop" component and to allow students to find out about other scholars on campus who could serve as advisors or intellectual resources. In addition to participation in discussions of the readings, the primary requirement for the course will be an empirical research paper--probably for most students this will be something econometric that builds on their methodological coursework, but we are open to other possibilities such as experimental/audit studies.  Open to students with ECON, RES-ECON, or STPEC as their primary major.  Prerequisite: RES-ECON 212, ECON 452, or STATISTC 240.  Open only to Econ/STPEC/ResEcon primary majors until after juniors enroll. Meets with 597GS and 797GS.

EDUC 392E – Sexism
Saturday, Sunday  9:00-5:00 p.m.
TBA

Workshop addresses the dynamics of sexism on personal and institutional levels.

ENGLISH 132 – Gender, Sexuality, Literature and Culture (4 sections offered)
Literature treating the relationship between man and woman. Topics may include: the nature of love, the image of the hero and heroine, and definitions, past and present, of the masculine and feminine. (Gen.Ed. AL, G)

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.  - Matthew Donlevy
This course will charge students with critically engaging a long history of the de/re-construction of American masculinity. We will trace the development of various masculine identities and idealities across the Nineteenth century, and place them in conversation with current lived realities. Students will engage with texts ranging from a nascent portraiture to fashion advertisements, and from labor songs to utopian prose. We will interrogate the emergence of a working class eroticized body, and the consequences of this in regards to bourgeois masculine self-conceptualizations. We will trace the role Black masculinity played in influencing both working class and bourgeois masculinities even as being influenced in turn. We will do so much more.  This will be a discussion driven course with a significant reading load. However, each of the texts we engage will leave you wishing you could erase it from your mind and start again. This class welcomes all members of our academic community that are prepared roll up their sleeves and genuinely interrogate discourses that worked to establish some viable masculinities while negating, often through force, others.

Monday, Wednesday, Friday  10:10-11:00 a.m. – Nicole Erhardt
This course will examine contemporary poetry published in the past 20 years that engages questions of gender, sexuality, family, and migration. Much of our semester will focus on poets whose poetry is informed by diasporic contexts. Questions we will concern ourselves with: What does family teach us about gender, sexuality, and culture? What values, behaviors, and ideologies are passed down intergenerationally? How do poets represent these intersections of family, gender, and sexuality—especially when "home" is a complicated and plural concept? Like many of the poets we will read in this class, you will have both creative and critical writing assignments, ranging from the traditional academic essay to poetry to conducting interviews. Our challenge is to explore commonalities across contexts without collapsing their differences, and to consider what literature can reveal about creative approaches to memory, recognition, and justice.

Monday, Wednesday, Friday  11:15-12:05 p.m. – Korka Sall
This course examines gender, sexuality, literature, and culture from the African Diaspora. We will look at gender norms and how they are represented, challenged, or questioned in the African Diaspora literature and the Global South by tracing the social construction of gender, the performativity of gender, and the image of the hero and heroine. Examining and discussing gender, sexuality, literature and culture will help us develop a better understanding of social norms and how they impact different cultures and readers.  Through novels, books, film, music, poetry, essay and articles by artists and writers from different parts of the world, we will focus on the different representations of masculinity and femininity in literature but also the definitions of sexuality and their effects on how people interact. Some of the questions this course will discuss include: How do colonial and post-colonial thoughts, literature and discussions shape gender, sexuality, literature and culture? How do female and male writers from the African Diaspora reinforce, challenge or question gender norms in literature? What is the image of the hero and heroine and how is it represented in literature? To what extend does the choice of the writers and artists reflect the performativity of masculinity and femininity? Authors may include Suzanne Cesaire, Mariama Ba, Ama Ata Aidoo, Aime Cesaire, Camara Laye, Jhumpa Lahiri, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Leopold Sedar Senghor, among others.

Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m. – Emily Campbell
This course will consider the roles of language and performance in representing and (de)constructing elements of identity, with particular attention to gender, race, class, disability, and settler coloniality. We will engage with contemporary (20th & 2st-century) texts, artworks, and other cultural objects such as Kara Walker’s A Subtlety, M. NourbeSe Philip’s Zong!, Wangechi Mutu’s The End of Eating Everything, Zainab Amadahy’s The Moons of Palmares, and Octavia Butler’s Fledgling. In dialogue with our readings and viewings, we will discuss questions such as: how is a reader also a spectator and/or performer? how does a text’s positioning of its reader(s) shape what we are able to recognize in its content?

 

 

ENGLISH 300 – Junior Year Seminar in English Studies:  The Queer Gothic
Tuesday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Heidi Holder

From its emergence in the 18th century, the gothic mode has centered on mysteries of identity; its fascination with the hidden, the forbidden, and the transgressive has made it a recurring site of queer representation. The course will survey key texts and critics to examine the trajectories, possibilities and persistence of the queer gothic. Readings may include the following: stories by Edgar Allan Poe, J.S. Le Fanu’s Carmilla, Bram Stoker’s Dracula, Patricia Highsmith’s The Talented Mr. Ripley, Sarah Waters’ Fingersmith and Randall Kenan’s Let the Dead Bury Their Dead. Some consideration of drama (Jen Silverman’s The Moors and Charles Ludlam’s The Mystery of Irma Vep) and film (James Whale’s The Dark Old House and Jim Sharman’s The Rocky Horror Picture Show).

ENGLISH 300 – Junior Year Seminar in English Studies:  Gender and the African American Literary Imagination
Monday, Wednesday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
Sarah Patterson

See department for description.

HISTORY 389 – U.S. Women’s History Since 1890
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-1:50 p.m.
Discussions, Friday  9:05, 10:10, 12:20
Laura Lovett

Explores the relationship of women to the social, cultural, economic and political developments shaping American society from 1890 to the present. Examines women's paid and unpaid labor, family life and sexuality, feminist movements and women's consciousness; emphasis on how class, race, ethnicity, and sexual choice have affected women's historical experience. Sophomore level and above. (Gen.Ed. HS, U)

HISTORY 397D – Women and Colonial Rule in Africa
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Joye Bowman

This seminar will examine African women during the colonial period. We will read historical essays, novels, as well as short stories. The major themes that we will discuss include: the impact of colonialism, Christianity, western education, urbanization and other forces of “modernization”. We will also discuss some of the most pressing issues facing African women today. Our examination will focus on women in several countries including Nigeria, Senegal,  Kenya and South Africa.

HISTORY 397REH
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Priyanka Srivastava

Imperialism cannot be understood merely as an economic-military-territorial system of control and exploitation. Cultural domination is integral to any sustained system of global exploitation. Focusing on cultural aspects of imperialism, this course explores the racial and sexual politics of British Empire in India from the late eighteenth to early twentieth century. Using a combination of primary and secondary sources as well as visual and literary material, we will examine how socially constructed racial and gendered hierarchies, and myths about the sexual practices of colonized people were linked to the pursuit and maintenance of imperial rule over India. We will analyze key scholarly perspectives on the following: forms of colonial knowledge, gender and social reforms, colonial masculinities, regulation of sexual behavior and prostitution, and the varying roles of colonial institutions, popular discourses, and cultural artifacts in producing racial and sexual stereotypes and in creating distinctions between the colonizers and the colonized.

HISTORY 397RR – History of Reproductive Rights Law
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Jennifer Nye

This course will explore the history of reproductive rights law in the United States, centering the reading of statutes, court decisions, amicus briefs, and law review articles. We will look at the progression of cases and legal reasoning involving a wide variety of reproductive rights issues, including forced sterilization, contraception, abortion, forced pregnancy/c-sections, policing pregnancy (through welfare law, employment policies and criminal law), and reproductive technologies. We will pay particular attention to how differently situated women were/are treated differently by the law, particularly on the basis of age, class, race, sexual orientation, and ability. We will also examine the role lawyers have historically played in advancing (or constraining) the goals of the reproductive rights movement(s) and explore the effectiveness of litigation as a strategy to secure these rights. Finally, we will consider the question of reproductive rights versus reproductive justice and whether reproductive justice can be obtained through advocating for reproductive rights

HISTORY 397SC – Sex and the Supreme Court
Tuesday  2:30-5:00 p.m.
Jennifer Nye

This course focuses on the U.S. Supreme Court and its rulings regarding sex and sexuality. What has the Court said about what type of sexual activity or sexual relationships are constitutionally protected and how and why has this changed over time? What is or should be the Court’s role in weighing in on these most intimate issues? We will examine several hot button issues such as reproduction (sterilization/contraception/abortion); marriage (polygamous/interracial/same sex); pornography/obscenity; sodomy; sexual assault on college campuses; and sex education in public schools. We will consider how the Court and advocates framed these issues, used or misused historical evidence, and how the argument and/or evidence changed depending on the audience (i.e. the Court or the general public). Students will write several short argumentative essays, learn how to read and brief Supreme Court cases, and present an oral argument based on one of their argumentative essays. Prior law-related coursework is helpful, but not required.

HONORS 242H – The American Family in Historical Perspectives
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Martha Yoder

An historical, cross-cultural, and interdisciplinary approach to the study of families in America. We will examine the histories of various groups, exploring how these experiences have resulted in different family dynamics. We will then take up the question of the continuing relevance of race, ethnicity, and social class to families in America today and to the discussion of family in American politics. (Gen.Ed. HS, U)

JAPANESE 391M/591M – Queer Japan in Literature and Culture
Tuesday, Thursday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
Stephen Miller

This is an upper- and graduate-level seminar that will examine how non-normative sexualities—especially same-sex sexualities and erotic desires (including love)—have been expressed in Japanese literature and culture during the premodern, modern and contemporary eras. Some of the literary figures we will be discussing include Ihara Saikaku, Murayama Kaita, Inagaki Taruho, Yoshiya Nobuko, Mori Ōgai, Takahashi Mutsuo, Mishima Yukio, and Tawada Yōko, among others. The readings for the course are moderately heavy in accordance with its status as an upper- and grad-level class. The course will be run primarily in the format of a discussion, with some background information supplied by the instructor. No knowledge of Japan or Japanese is required, but the students will be expected to recognize important names.

MANAGMNT 391B – Women and Men in Organizations
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 p.m.
Linda Smircich

This course explores the relevance and consequence of gender organizations, and management. As a central feature around which social life is organized, gender has implications for women, men, and how we work. Among the topics included: the gender gap; gender and leadership; gender and power; gender and entrepreneurship; men, management and masculinity, and debates about the "feminine advantage," mothers, fathers and organizations; work/life "balance"; the "opt out" phenomenon, "wanting to have it all" and "leaning in." Other topics will be included based on students' interests. The course will be run in seminar style, with the expectation that students will engage actively and thoughtfully with the material and with one another. Reading materials will be drawn from the scholarly literature and the popular press.  This course is open to Juniors & Seniors with majors in the Isenberg School of Management. Prerequisite: MANAGMNT 301.

MIDEAST 190B – Women, Gender, Sexuality in the Middle East
Monday, Wednesday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
Malissa Taylor

This course will examine general attitudes about sex and gender roles among people of the Middle East by studying primary sources and scholarly literature relating to sexuality and its place within Middle Eastern societies. The course investigates the cultural landscape of the Middle East before the rise of Islam and inquires how the mix of the new religion together with the prevailing customs of Late Antiquity created a new framework for gendered relations. The course considers debates pertaining to gender roles and sexuality in the medieval and early modern periods, and will probe the changing contours of women’s lives during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. (GenEd HS, G)

POLISCI 291U – UMass Women Into Leadership
Tuesday  5:30-8:00 p.m.
Michelle Goncalves

UMass Women into Leadership (UWiL) is a series of hands-on workshops designed to educate participants on the existence and causes of gender disparities in public service, to provide leadership training to prepare participants to enter public service careers, and to offer mentoring and networking programs to help launch public service careers.  Open to students who have been accepted into the UWiL program. Instructor's email: uwil@umass.edu

POLISCI 297W – Introduction to Women and Politics in the USA
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Maryann Barakso

This course examines women's political incorporation in the United States primarily, but not exclusively, with respect to electoral politics. We explore women's pre-suffrage political activities before delving into the campaign for women's suffrage. We study the effects of achieving suffrage on women's political behavior during the period immediately following their achievement of the right to vote and beyond. The relationship between women and party politics will be probed before discussing the challenges women still face as candidates in state and federal legislatures in the U.S. The extent to which women's participation in campaigns and elections makes a substantive difference in policy making is considered. Subsequent discussions examine the role women's organizations currently play in expanding women's political representation in the U.S.

POLISCI 375 – Feminist Theory and Politics
Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Barbara Cruikshank

A theoretical consideration of different feminisms including liberal-feminism, socialist-feminism, anarcha-feminism, radical feminism and eco-feminism. Also examines: the relation between feminist theory and practice; the historical development of feminism; feminist issues within the canon of political theory; the problem of identity and difference(s) as related to race, class, and gender.

POLISCI 394FI – Family and the State
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Diane Curtis

Why and how is the state involved in the definition of families, access to marriage, and intervention on behalf of children? This course will address these and other questions as we explore the ways in which the legal boundaries and connections between government and family have evolved over the last century in the United States. Issues of gender, race, class and sexual orientation will naturally play a significant role in these explorations. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-PolSci majors.

PUBHLTH 328 – Fundamentals of Women’s Health
Wednesday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Sara Sabelawski

This course will provide a comprehensive overview of issues related to health in women, addressing areas including but not limited to biology, psychology, geography, economics, health policy, and social issues.

PUBHLTH 490J – Reproductive Justice
Wednesday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Sara Sabelawski

This course will provide a comprehensive overview of issues related to health in women, addressing areas including but not limited to biology, psychology, geography, economics, health policy, and social issues.

PSYCH 391ZZ – Psychology of the Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Experience
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
John Bickford

Students in this course will explore psychological theory and research pertaining to gay, lesbian, and bisexual people. Topics include sexual orientation, sexual identity development, stigma management, heterosexism & homonegativity, gender roles, same-sex relationships, LGB families, LGB diversity, and LGB mental health.

PUBHLTH 490J – Reproductive Justice
Monday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Denise Leckenby

This course is designed to explore social scientific, feminist, and critical approaches to reproductive health issues. It looks at reproduction in the broader structural (socioeconomic and political) contexts in which it is situated. In particular, in the course we explore the gendered, racialized, cultural, sexual, and classed dimensions that underlie women’s reproduction, with special attention to the long-term health effects of racism, poverty, and sexism.

SOCIOL 106 – Race, Gender, Class and Ethnicity
Monday, Wednesday, Friday  10:10-11:00 a.m. – C.N Le
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m. – Mahala Stewart

Introduction to Sociology. Analysis of the consequences of membership in racial, gender, class and ethnic groups on social, economic and political life. (Gen.Ed. SB, U)

SOCIOL 283 – Gender and Society
Tuesday, Thursday  8:30-9:45 a.m.
Cathryn Brubaker

Analysis of: 1) historical and cross-cultural variation in positions and relationships of women and men; 2) contemporary creation and internalization of gender and maintenance of gender differences in adult life; 3) recent social movements to transform or maintain "traditional" positions of women and men. Prerequisite: 100-level Sociology course.

SOCIOL 287 – Sexuality and Society
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Janice Irvine

The many ways in which social factors shape sexuality. Focus on cultural diversity, including such factors as race/ethnicity, gender, and sexual identity in organizing sexuality in both individuals and social groups. Prerequisite: 100-level Sociology course. (Gen.Ed. SB, U).

SPANISH 597WF – Introduction to Feminist Film Theory and Women’s Film Practice
Monday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Barbara Zecchi

See department for description.

AFROAM 252 – Afro American Image in American Writing
Tuesday, Thursday
James Smethurst

An intensive survey of the portrayals of Afro-Americans in American literature, examining how characters, themes, and ideas are portrayed when filtered through the race, gender, class, politics, historical time frame, and individual artistic aesthetic of a variety of writers.

AFROAM 591D – Comparative Black Politics in America
Tuesday, 4:00-6:30 p.m.
Agustin Lao-Montes

The current global crisis that include not only economic malaise but also a rise in political authoritarianism and policing by states, had widened social and racial inequalities and hence racial and sexual violence. In this world-historical context there has been an emergence of Black movements across the Americas. This course will study Black movements in Brazil, Colombia, Cuba, the United States and Venezuela, looking at their particularities and differences as well as their similarities and relationships. The class will offer a historical perspective while focusing on contemporary Black movements.

ANTHRO 258 – Food and Culture
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Dana Conzo

This course surveys how cultural anthropologists have studied the big questions about food and culture. How and why do people restrict what foods are considered “edible” or morally acceptable? How is food processed and prepared, and what does food tell us about other aspects of culture like gender and ethnic identity? How have power issues of gender, class, and colonialism shaped people’s access to food? How has industrialization changed food, and where are foodways headed in the future? Along the way, students will read and see films about foodways in Europe, Africa, Asia, the United States, and Latin America. (Gen. Ed. SB, G).

ANTHRO 344 – Italy:  Facism to Fashion
Tuseday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Elizabeth Krause

This course complements the Department of Anthropology’s strength in the anthropology of Europe. This course uses Italy as a case study to investigate four key themes: 1) the state, civil society, and hegemony; 2) kinship, gender, and reproduction; 3) culture and economy; and 4) immigration and globalization. Throughout, we will consider symbolic as well as materialist approaches to grasping experiences of everyday life as they play out in one of Europe?s southern territories. (Gen. Ed. SB, G)

ANTHRO 597A – Critical Race Theory
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Amanda Johnson

See department for description.

ASIAN 397B – Bridging Asian and Asian American Generations
Wednesday  6:00-8:00 p.m.
C.N. Le

Talks by local and visiting faculty, as well as film screenings and performances, designed to introduce students to the multi-layered connections between Asia and Asian America. Areas that will be considered include: popular culture, youth subcultures, labor, issues of gender and sexuality, and migration and immigrant communities. Discussions emphasize how issues play out at local, national and transnational levels.

COMM 271 – Humor in Society
Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:20 p.m.
Friday discussions  10:10, 11:15, 12:20, 1:25
Stephen Olbrys Gencarella

This course examines humor as a significant form of creative expression in social and political life. In recent decades, scholars of all persuasions from the humanities, social sciences, and even hard sciences have examined this subject through a critical lens, leading to the development of an interdisciplinary field known as humor studies. This course provides an introduction to that burgeoning field. Topics will include different theories of humor, the relationship between humor and play, the differences between humor and comedy, the use of humor in the redress of political and social tensions, the importance of the body in humor, and the role of humor in maintaining identity, especially in the negotiation of race, gender, class, ethnicity, religion, and sexual orientation. (Gen Ed SB, U)

COMM 297FA – Spirit and Stories: The Folklore of Alcohol
Monday  4:00-6:45 p.m.
Stephen Olbrys Gencarella

This course examines the vast store of folklore inspired by and directed at alcohol and its cultural reach. Folklore means traditional expressive practices ranging from the verbal arts (such as stories and songs) to material culture (such as crafts and medicine) to customary activities (such as rituals and beliefs). The range of folklore herein is both global and ancient; that is, it concerns the entire history of alcohol, which in effect necessitates attention to the entire history of humanity in a global perspective. Specific lectures will address cultural differences concerning alcohol in the negotiation of race, ethnicity, class, nationhood, religion, gender, and political identity.
 

COMM 394EI – Performance & Politics of Race
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Kimberlee Perez

This course looks at the ways race, racial identities, and interracial relations are formed through and by communication practices in present-day U.S. America. Though focusing on U.S. America in the current historical moment, the course takes into account the ways history as well as the transnational flows of people and capital inform and define conversations about race and racial identities. Race will be discussed as intersectional, taking into account the ways race is understood and performed in relation to gender, sexuality, class, and nation. The course will focus on the performance and communications of race, ranging from everyday interactions, personal narratives and storytelling, intra- and inter-racial dialogue, and staged performances.

COMM 495A – Performance Ethnography
Monday, Wednesday  11:15-1:00 p.m.
Claudio Moreira

What is Ethnography? What is Performance (auto) Ethnography? How can we think about Performing Ethnography? Drawing heavily on the works of Dwight Conquergood, Norman Denzin, and D. Soyini Madison, we give a rest to traditional forms of qualitative inquiry as we disrupt the notion of "business as usual" in the academic space. We will examine the interpenetrating relationships among performance, ethnography, and culture. The readings and assignments forefront localized critical pedagogy, critical personal narratives, decolonizing and interpretive inquiry as moral, political discourse. From the everyday space where gender, race, class, and performances intersect, we will examine how the practices of critical inquiry can be used to imagine, write and perform a free democratic society.

COMPLIT 231 – Comedy
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m. – Sara Ceroni
Monday, Wednesday, Friday  1:15-2:15 p.m. – Daniel Navarez Araujo

Our course begins with the premise that contemporary American comedy is informed by the histories of ethnic American groups -- African Americans, Native Americans, Asian Americans and U.S. Latinos/Latinas -- along with issues of race, class, sexuality and citizenship. American comedians, independent filmmakers, feminists and transgendered comics deploy the language of comedy to invoke serious social matters in contemporary American life: racism, heterosexism, homophobia, class biases against the poor and the undocumented, misogyny, war and other burning issues of the day. We will thus consider that the ends of comedy are more than laughter. Comedy confronts political issues that are constitutive of and threatening to the U.S. body politic.

COMPLIT 320H – Irish Writers and Cultural Context
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Patricia Gorman

In this class, we read and discuss classic Irish short stories, contemporary drama, and the experimental modern and contemporary novel. We screen award-winning films and listen to and discuss poetry. Topics represented in these works include: theology, myth, nationalism, sexual politics, music and art. Students may choose their area of concentration. Course content originates in Irish culture and provides the opportunity comparative, global inquiry.
Gen Ed (AL)

COMPLIT 391SF/591SF – International Science Fiction Cinema
Tuesday  7:00-10:00 p.m.
Discussions Thursday  2:30-3:20, Friday 9:05 and 12:10
Nicholas Couch

This course provides an introduction to science fiction cinema from the end of the nineteenth century to today. Beginning with the experiments of the Melies Brothers and the importance of German Expressionist films like Fritz Lang's Metropolis, the course considers technological prognostication from Destination Moon to 2001: A Space Odyssey, adventure and science fiction in films like Forbidden Planet and Star Wars, and the dystopian imagination from Invasion of the Body Snatchers to District 9. The course will also highlight the roles of women writers and directors from Thea von Harbou to Kathryn Bigelow, and technological cinematic advances from matte painting and process shots to CGI.

ECON 397MI – City, Industry, Labor in Colonial India
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Priyanka Srivastava

Focusing on Calcutta (present day Kolkata) and Bombay (present day Mumbai), the two most important port cities and industrial centers of British India, this course examines how trade and industrialization shaped urban society and politics in colonial India. We will explore themes that include the following: colonial trade, the gendered history of colonial labor migration, beginning of factory industries, the emergence of a class of industrial entrepreneurs and wage earners, the built environment of colonial cities, industrial housing, the development of labor unions and their interactions with the anti-imperialist nationalist politics.

EDUC 377 – Introduction to Multicultural Education
Monday 12:20-2:50 p.m.
Nina Kositsky

Introduction to the sociohistorical, philosophical, and pedagogical foundations of cultural pluralism and multicultural education. Topics include experiences of racial minorities, white ethnic groups and women; intergroup relations in American society, sociocultural influences and biases in schools; and philosophies of cultural pluralism. (Gen Ed. U)

ENGLISH 254 – Writing and Reading Imaginative Literature
Monday, Wednesday, Friday  10:10-11:00 a.m.
Alex Benke

At the core of every great story lies either sex or death (or perhaps both--as the French would say, le petite mort). Love and the human condition each battle for the title of the ultimate driving force behind all creative expression. How do we explore such ultimately human content when it is confined to words on a page? How do we make sense of these two messes using the tool of writing? How do the messiness of sex and relationships, and the enormity of death, individually defy both poetry and prose? How do these two obsessions force writing to question its own form--force forms to break open--and force our writing minds to break open, to explore beyond "the rules," and beyond our "selves"?  Through a sex-positive feminist lens, we'll read--and challenge--texts that defy form and genre. We'll dig into a range of texts that ignore assumptions about form in pursuit of their own truth. By looking beyond the restrictions of "fiction" and "poetry," we'll be able to see how the work itself reaches its truest truth.

ENGLISH 269 – American Literature and Culture after 1865
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 p.m.
Gina Occasion

This course looks at national identity, childhood, and protest in America through the narrative spaces of literature. We do so to interrogate marginalized subject positions in our close readings, analyzing the relationships between minor status and race, class, gender, ability, geographic location, and historical moment. This methodology will bring to the surface the ways in which childhood, and youth culture more broadly, are contentious spaces that can both resist and reaffirm oppressive structures. Furthermore, we will see, the privilege of even having a childhood or being recognized as a child (in the ideal sense) is contingent on systems and categories of power. Our questions will consider the relationships between art and protest, diverse embodiments of protest and resistance, and the cultural and historical contexts that inform these movements.  Authors in this survey may include Sarah Winnemucca, Charles Eastman, W.E.B. Du Bois, Harper Lee, James Baldwin, Alice Walker, and Louise Erdrich.

ENGLISH 279 – Introduction to American Studies
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 p.m.
Ron Welburn

Interdisciplinary approach to the study of American culture. Focus on issues of race, class, gender, and ethnicity. Readings drawn from literature, history, the social sciences, philosophy and fine arts. Supplemented with audio-visual materials and films, slides of paintings, architecture, photography and material culture, and music.

ENGLISH 371 – African American Literature
Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Sarah Patterson

In this class, we will become familiar with genres and rhetorics that nineteenth-century Black writers employ to articulate perspectives on the African American and Diaspora experience. We will explore notions of identity, public consciousness and national belonging, asking: what is the interplay between the imagination and self-determinism? How do sites of publication influence ideas about race, gender, class and community? Readings will draw from works by Mary Prince, Frederick Douglass, Frank Webb and Harriet Wilson. As a way to consider visual rhetorics, students will sometimes pair readings with contemporaneous newspaper literature and will regularly consider the historical moment out of which readings emerge. In addition to active class participation, assignments will include a short response, mid-term exam, final research paper and digital writing entry.

HISTORY 397JL – Social Justice Lawyering
Thursday  2:30-5:00 p.m.
Jennifer Nye

From fighting Jim Crow segregation to challenging the recent Muslim travel ban, judicial review has historically been used as a strategy to reign-in executive and legislative over-reach and protect Constitutional rights. This course will examine how lawyers, social movements, and everyday people have used litigation to advocate for social justice in the United States. Through reading in-depth studies of important civil and criminal cases, we will explore such questions as: What is the history of social justice lawyering in the United States and how, why and when have social movements turned to litigation to advance their causes? What are the pros and cons of using litigation to achieve social justice, versus other tools like direct action, lobbying for political change, and community organizing? How effective is litigation in achieving the goals originally envisioned by lawyers, activists, and litigants? How have lawyers constrained or expanded the vision of social justice movements? What dilemmas do lawyers who are ethically bound to zealously advocate for the interests of individual clients face when they are additionally interested in advancing "a cause"? Cases explored may include issues such as civil rights, women's rights, free speech, LGBT/Queer rights, disability rights, environmental justice, criminal justice, poverty and people's lawyering, immigration rights, and the rise of conservative social movement lawyering. Prior law-related coursework helpful, but not required.

HISTORY 397TF – What is on your Plate? A Transnational History of Food in North America
Monday, Wednesday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
Julie De Chantal

Have you ever looked at your plate and wondered where the different foods came from? Have you ever wondered when Americans began to love chocolate, bananas, or sushi? In this course, we will explore a transnational history of food, beginning with the Natives of North America prior to European contact and ending with the processed boxed meals found on our supermarket shelves today. We will look at the ways in which our food systems developed, how they were influenced by immigration and intra-continental movements, and how the American food systems changed food worldwide. As we examine the cultural, political, and economic dimensions of food, we will analyse how food production, distribution, preparation, and consumption are shaped by race, gender, policies, marketing, as well as agricultural and labor practices. Finally, we will explore food activism, vegetarianism and veganism, and the development of diet fads. In this course, you will trace your family's culinary history, cook an old recipe or two, and will work with UMass archives extensive collection of old cookbooks.

HONORS 321H – Violence in American Culture
Monday, Wednesday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
Ventura Perez

This course will explore the complex social and cultural interactions that can lead to violence. We will begin by examining various theories of human violence from a number of disciplines: anthropology, psychology, and sociology. Students will then survey different cultural attitudes towards violence beginning with several prehistoric sites from the American Southwest and northern Mexico. Next, the course will consider the historical roots of American violence starting with the European invasion of North America. Specific instances of violence in American history will also be considered, including the attempted genocide of American Indians, the enslavement of African Americans, and the American Civil War. The second half of the course will focus on a number of contemporary issues of American violence including race violence, hate crimes, violence against women, family violence, gang violence, and the violence in contemporary art and film. (Gen.Ed. SB, U)

JOURNAL 425 – The Politics of Sport
Tuesday, Thursday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
Nicholas McBride

This course examines how the politics of gender, sexual identity and race play out in the arena of sports. Through readings, writing, documentary viewing and discussion, students will explore the ways in which sports either constructs or breaks down barriers among individuals and groups and how journalism is involved in the process.

POLISCI 361/361HH – Civil Liberties
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Sheldon Goldman

Development of constitutional law in the civil liberties sphere. First Amendment freedoms of speech, press, and religion, and certain rights of the accused; the rights of African-Americans and other minorites and the rights of women and gays under the equal protection of the laws clause. Prerequisite: basic American politics course or equivalent.

POLISCI 394SPH – Sports, Policy and Politics
Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Elizabeth Sharrow

Where are politics in the spaces we go for leisure and play? Sports and politics have become increasingly intertwined over the past 40 years. Local, state, and federal governments, as well as non-governmental bodies like the NCAA, regulate who can participate in sports, and what standards players must meet to do so. But sports have also become the battleground for major political discussions around sex equity, racial inclusion, sexuality, physical ability, and drug testing. Why and how has this happened, and how can studying sports teach us about the politics of inclusion, political identity, and public policy? We will focus on the linkages between policy, politics, and sports in historical and contemporary contexts, primarily in the U.S. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-PolSci majors.

PUBHLTH 389 – Health Inequities
Tuesday, Thursday  8:30-9:45 a.m.
Jin Kim-Mozeleski

While the health and wellbeing of the nation has improved overall, racial, ethnic, gender and sexuality disparities in morbidity and mortality persist. To successfully address growing disparities, it is important to understand social determinants of health and translate current knowledge into specific strategies to undo health inequalities. This course will explore social justice as a philosophical underpinning of public health and will consider the etiology of disease rooted in social conditions. It aims to strengthen critical thinking, self-discovery, and knowledge of ways in which socioeconomic, political, and cultural systems structure health outcomes.

SOCIOL 103 – Social Problems
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Donald Tomaskovic-Devey

Introduction to sociology. America's major social problems--past and present--are examined. These include crime, mental health, drug addiction, family tensions and inequalities based on race, gender, ethnicity and social class.
(Gen.Ed. SB, U)

SOCIOL 292A – Sociology of Love
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Barbara Tomaskovic-Devey

This course looks at a subject that we all take for granted, but none of us understand. Love is both a physiological state and a socially constructed experience. We will examine the major bio-chemical, psychological, and sociological theories that have attempted to explain the causes and nature of love and attraction. We will also look at the social construction of love through Western history, as well as in other cultures, and at the complex relationships that exist between love, "courtship", marriage, and sexuality. We will conclude with a look at contemporary social constructions of love, sex and relationships.

STPEC 189 – Introduction to Radical Social Theory in Historical Context
Wednesday  4:00-6:30 p.m.

Graciela Monteagudo

This is an introductory course to radical social theory. Our focus is the history of social thought in the West, and the postcolonial critiques of some of these ideas. In this course, students will learn that "radical" means "at the root," and radical social theory is theory that explains the roots of social inequalities and proposes ways of transforming society to achieve justice. As a General Education course, our goal is for students to have the opportunity to discuss key societal issues through a variety of disciplines, including philosophy, anthropology, history, economy, African-American, Native American and gender and sexuality studies. Through analysis of readings and films, we will explore the connection between cultural processes and power in the West and the implications for non-Western people on a global scale and on different times and places.
 

STPEC 320 – Writing for Critical Consciousness
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.

Marissa Carrere

Students hone skills necessary to write in the genres that STPEC majors encounter most often in the course of their academic and professional careers. Contact department for details.  Open to Senior and Junior STPEC majors only.  You must have fulfilled your CW Gen. Ed. requirement to enroll in this course.  STPEC sophomores may request this course by filling out an add request form available in the STPEC Program Office.

STPEC 391H – STPEC Core Seminar I
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Graciela Monteagudo

STPEC Core Seminar I focuses on major theoretical currents in political theory and the historical circumstances that gave rise to those theories-in particular Liberalism, Marxism, Anarchism, Postcolonial, and Poststructural theories. As this is an interdisciplinary class, we will be bringing in analytic tools from various disciplines paying attention to the historical construction and reception of ideas.

STPEC 391H – STPEC Core Seminar II
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Graciela Monteagudo

STPEC Core Seminar II focuses on a series of interrelated political, social and theoretical movements of the 20th and 21st Century with an emphasis on how political practices and philosophies relate to the successes and catastrophic failures of modernism in complex and contradictory ways. Some of the topics addressed include anti/post-colonialism, the role of identity in political theory/practice and poststructuralism. We will research the connection between race, class, gender, sexuality, able-bodiness and other axes of oppression resistance under neoliberalism, including violence against women under neoliberalism. A major research paper of the student's choosing will be produced over the course of the semester allowing her/him to more deeply engage with a topic, and to practice applying the critical methodological and theoretical tools developed in the STPEC curriculum.

STPEC 492H – Focus Seminar II – Workplace Law/Capitalist America
Tuesday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Harris Freeman

The seminar examines how economic crises, political upheavals and social movements have influenced the development of workplace rights, and explores how the law has impacted the trajectory of the labor movement over the course of the development of American capitalism. The seminar opens with the historical and socio-political context in which workplace rights developed during the rise of industrial capitalism. Next, we explore how modern workplace law arose through the rise of industrial unionism in the New Deal era and during the decades following World War II. Topics to be studied include laws governing union organizing, workers' control, collective bargaining, as well as the laws governing struggles to overcome workplace race and sex discrimination. We conclude with legal challenges faced by marginalized and disempowered workers in the 21st century: immigrant workers' rights; efforts to stop factory closings and job loss; free speech rights in the workplace; discrimination against LGBT workers; and the failure of workplace law to keep pace with major shifts that have restructured work and labor markets over the course of the last twenty-five years.

STPEC 491H – Focus Seminar I – Race at Work/Workers of Color and the American Labor Movement
Thursday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Traci Parker

This course explores the relationship between race and labor, reaching from the age of emancipation through the Reagan era. Engaging historical and filmic texts, this course examines various themes in labor history and class formation. Beginning with an interrogation of race in labor history as a field of historical study, this course moves along chronological and thematic axes to investigate changes in wage and labor structure, agricultural and industrial production, domestic work, and service work. It will consider the experiences ? including, but not limited to migration, community building and organizing, labor unions, policy, and leisure ? of African American, Asian, and Mexican Americans, among others. The Civil Rights Movement and the Fair Employment Movement will be critical to this course as they best highlight the strategies and patterns of labor organizations, protests, and negotiation among workers of color since emancipation. This course also will explore affirmative action and the reconsolidation of racial discrimination in the workplace in the late twentieth century.

THEATER 393J – Asian American Theater History
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Priscilla Page

In this course, we will examine theatrical works and the social and political contexts of Asian American theater-makers in the US. Weaving in mediums such as film, poetry, fiction, visual art, and scholarship, we will look at issues of race and gender as social constructs that Asian Americans are not only subject to, but also continuously challenge through cultural production. This is a dramaturgy course that requires students to engage with the theatrical texts within various artistic and theoretical frameworks. Grounded in post-colonial and transnational feminist theories, we define “theater” in this course as a vital cultural weapon with which historically disenfranchised communities in the U.S. have inserted themselves into the cultural narrative that often silences and erases them.  We will closely examine the gendering of Asian bodies as a form of colonization. Though the focus of the course is the Asian American experience, we must acknowledge that Asian Americans have always been “alien bodies” or threats to the United States despite legal recognition or other legal indicators of nationality and citizenship. Asian Americans must negotiate their subjectivity, identity, and belonging within the separate yet intertwining frameworks of the United States and Asia.

THEATER 497D – Multicultural Theater Practice
Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Priscilla Page

In this course, students will examine African and African American theater produced in the 20th and 21st century and written or translated into English. We will observe the differences and similarities between work across geographic and temporal locations and conduct dramaturgical research to support concept statements that could facilitate professional productions of these works. Because the literary work we will consider spans about a century and comes from the U.S., the Caribbean and the African continent, we will pay special attention to questions about race, culture and representation including problematic practices such as the consistent exclusion of dramatic work that challenges dominant social and political agendas across the US. More importantly, we will examine how artists use their creative work to articulate a sense of self, community and nation and just how contentious this process continues to be for artists of the African diaspora. Using post-colonial theory, we will hone our skills in understanding culturally specific dramatic literature that explores concepts of power, oppression, and representation.

WGSS 691B – Issues in Feminist Research
Monday 2:30-5:00 p.m.
Laura Briggs

This is a graduate seminar in feminist research, and constitutes a core course for students enrolled in the Graduate Certificate Program in Advanced Feminist Research. Feminism has long been interested in a foundational way in questions of epistemology (how we know what we know) and research methodology (how we go about developing original research), because in its most recent incarnations, post-1968, it emerged as an academic formation that asked basic questions about disciplines: how did they invent a world without women? How was systemic bias built into its knowledge systems such that they made women, people of color, working class people, people outside the US and Europe (“the West,” as it came to be called, through an Orientalist bit of geographic folly), peasants, slaves, indigenous people, colonized people, (most) queers, trans folk and a great many others invisible? Obviously, in this endeavor feminists had help from many other fields and activist movements, which worked together across disciplines and movements to transform knowledge. In many ways, they won—no discipline or field of study is unchanged or untouched by these inquiries, although some are obviously more resistant than others. As this is a required course for graduate students enrolled in the Advanced Certificate in Advanced Feminist Studies, those students have priority for enrollment.  Please email lindah@wost.umass.edu to request enrollment in the course.  
These courses satisfy the Transnational/Critical Race Feminisms requirement for the Graduate Certificate in Advanced Feminist Studies

WGSS 694D – Decolonialism, Sexuality and Gender
Tuesday  10:00-12:45 p.m.
Svati Shah

This seminar will generate an overview of the debates, scholarship, and politics of queer and transgender studies in Asia, Africa and Latin America. The visibility and rubric of ‘emergence’ with respect to LGBTQI (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and intersex) people, communities and politics in these ‘regions’ of the world have been accompanied by scholarship which is variously characterized as ‘decolonial’ and ‘postcolonial.’ The seminar will read through major works in order to specify where each term is used, by whom, and whether and how these terms reflect the complexities of queer and transgender scholarship and movement spaces in the non-Western world. Questions that these literatures raise include, but are not limited to: identitarianism, genealogies of queer and transgender politics, urbanization and migration, sexual commerce and sex work, nationalism and citizenship, indigeneity, legal campaigns against criminalization, access to health care, and informal economies.

WGSS 692J/392J – Feminisms and Environmental Justice
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Kiran Asher

While feminism and environmental justice are both political projects of social change, their objects or objectives are not the same. As we sink into the 21st century, amid looming fears of ecological catastrophes and socio-economic crises, is a conversation between these two projects likely to be productive for both struggles, or are their goals at odds with each other? This class will examine the perceived, existing, and potential links (or disjuncts) between feminism and environmental justice. Our interdisciplinary inquiry will be guided by questions such as: What is understood by the terms "feminism" and "environmental justice"? How have nature and the environment figured in feminist writings and feminist ideas of justice? Conversely, how do women and gender figure in ideas and struggles for environmental justice? Indeed, how do feminist ideals inform (or not) other struggles for social change (such as those of peasants, workers, ethnic groups, queer folk, and more)?

WGSS 693N – Native Feminisms and Settler Colonial Studies - Cancelled
Wednesday  2:30-5:00
Stina Soderling

How is settler colonialism – the process of (violently) displacing Native populations and claiming land by a colonizing population – related to gender and sexuality? And how does it connect to, and differ from, other forms of coloniality and postcolonialism? This course will examine recent writings in Native feminism and settler-colonial studies, in conjunction with social movements' engagement (or lack thereof) with indigenous and gender justice and decolonization. We will pay attention to how feminist and queer theory has and has not engaged with Native Studies, and to points of contact between these theories and activist work. While the course will primarily focus on current and recent events, we will put these in historical context by engaging a longer history of activism and resitance. Movements studied in the course will include Idle No More, Occupy Wall Street, and the Standing Rock protest against the Dakota Access Pipeline. Readings will include works by Aileen Moreton-Robinson, Glen Coulthard, Audra Simpson, Linda Tuhiwai-Smith, Harsha Walia, Scott Lauria Morgensen, Eva Garroutte, and Mark Rifkin, as well as materials produced by social movements. As a graduate seminar, this course will have significant student involvement and input, including facilitating part of class meetings.
 

AFROAM 692V – Topics in Black Women’s History
Thursday  11:30-2:00 p.m.
Traci Parker

See department for description.

AFROAM 667 – Afro American Image in American Literature
Monday  11:15-1:45 p.m.
Steven Tracy

An intensive survey of the portrayals of Afro-Americans in American literature, examining how characters, themes, and ideas are portrayed when filtered through the race, gender, class, politics, historical time frame, and individual artistic aesthetic of a variety of writers.

ENGLISH 891RK – Renaissance Keywords and the New Queer Philology
Thursday  1:00-3:30 p.m.
Marjorie Rubright

What can we learn from a single word? How is the turn to a new queer philology changing both our answers to and our pursuit of this question? In the Renaissance, what it meant to categorize, historicize, and define words as English was changing. For dictionary makers, words offered singular entry points into the variety of the English language; for antiquarians interested in recovering England’s ancient past, words were half-buried relics or fossils conveying a history of English discoverable by way of etymology as well as geological and geographical inquiry; for poets and playwrights, language invited neologism and grammatical invention—words were sites of experimental play. This course explores both how early moderns shaped ideas of English through debates around particular words and how 20th- and 21st-century critics have likewise taken individual words as their entry into the study of the early modern world. Each week we will focus on particular clusters of words that emerge in the drama and prose of the period (including race, sex, slave, sodomite, friend, Moor, Turk, Indian, earth, world, grafter, mingle-mangle, incorporated, baffled). We’ll consider foundational ‘keywords' studies by Raymond Williams,C.S. Lewis, and William Empson together with recent approaches: Patricia Parker’s 'verbal networks,' Roland Greene’s 'critical semantics,' Jeffrey Masten’s 'queer philology,' Paula Blank’s ‘queer etymology,' and Susan Stryker and Paisley Currah’s ‘keywords for transgender studies.’ Throughout, we’ll consider what has all along been queer about the 'love of logos' and what philology’s queer future might look like. While our central focus will be on the period 1500-1700, our engagements will span broadly from the biblical story of the Tower of Babel to Stephen Colbert’s comic segment, ‘The Word.’

JAPANESE 391M/591M – Queer Japan in Literature and Culture
Tuesday, Thursday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
Stephen Miller

This is an upper- and graduate-level seminar that will examine how non-normative sexualities—especially same-sex sexualities and erotic desires (including love)—have been expressed in Japanese literature and culture during the premodern, modern and contemporary eras. Some of the literary figures we will be discussing include Ihara Saikaku, Murayama Kaita, Inagaki Taruho, Yoshiya Nobuko, Mori Ōgai, Takahashi Mutsuo, Mishima Yukio, and Tawada Yōko, among others. The readings for the course are moderately heavy in accordance with its status as an upper- and grad-level class. The course will be run primarily in the format of a discussion, with some background information supplied by the instructor. No knowledge of Japan or Japanese is required, but the students will be expected to recognize important names.

POLISCI 795F – Feminist Politics:  Comparative and Transnational Perspectives
Tuesday  5:30-8:00 p.m.
Sonia Alvarez

Drawing on case studies from Latin America, Europe, North America, and other world regions, this course will analyze the uneven topographies of space, place, and power in and across which feminist politics travel and are enacted. Themes explored include comparative and transnational epistemologies; the horizontal and vertical flows of feminist politics into parallel social movements and national and international institutions (“sidestreaming” and “mainstreaming,” respectively); navigating and resisting development; and, negotiating, confronting, or colluding with neoliberalism. Particular attention will be focused on the transnational dynamics of each of these themes and to the complex cultural and political translations they require of feminist activists and scholars alike.

These courses count towards the Open Election for the Graduate Certificate in Advanced Feminist Studies

COMM 693D – Introduction to Film Theory
Tuesday  4:00-6:45 p.m.
Anne Ciecko

This course offers an introductory overview of major approaches to the study of film and audiovisual media, including formalism and realism ("classical" film theory), and theoretical and critical methods informed by structuralism, semiology, phenomenology, psychoanalysis, political theory, and cultural studies. Auteurism, feminist film theory, queer theory, genre studies, spectator/audience/ reception, star and performance studies, apparatus theory, postcolonial theory, and theories of new media will also be considered. Film clips and occasional longer works will be shown in class, but students will also be responsible for watching a number of films and/or other audiovisual materials outside class. Writing assignments will provide students with opportunities to further engage with and respond to course readings and related materials, and enable them to develop (and present to the class) exploratory work on projects tailored to individual interests and goals. Prior study of film is not required. This course is a requirement for the Graduate Certificate in Film Studies, but is open to all graduate students, any major or program.

ECON 397GS/597GS/797GS – Gender, Sexuality, Work and Pay:   Empirical Perspectives
Tuesday  1:00-3:45 p.m.
Lee Badgett/Nancy Folbre

See department for description.  Open to students with ECON, RES-ECON, or STPEC as their primary major.  Prerequisite: RES-ECON 212, ECON 452, or STATISTC 240.  Open only to Econ/STPEC/ResEcon primary majors until after juniors enroll. Meets with 597GS and 797GS.

HISTORY 791PG/ POLISCI 791PG – History of U.S. Social Policy, Politics of Gender
Monday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Elizabeth Sharrow

This interdisciplinary course, designed for students in both Political Science and History, will concentrate on approaches to the study of the history of U.S. public policy aimed at addressing social and political inequalities. We will explore the methods, findings, and controversies in research about public policy in American politics, history, and political science from a range of theoretical and methodological perspectives and approaches. Readings will focus our attention on policies aimed at the overlapping axes of marginalization on the basis of gender, race, class, and sexuality, in particular. Throughout the course, we will analyze the ways in which policy, over time, has come to address issues and discrimination in intersectional ways, defining politically-relevant categories, identities, and forms of marginalization, such as gender, sex, race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, and ideological and partisan identification.

SOCIOL 792B – Gender Seminar
Tuesday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Joya Misra

See Department for description.

HPP 691D – Maternal and Child Health Policy
Wednesday  6:45-9:10 p.m.
Laura Attanasio

This course is designed to introduce students to a maternal and child public health perspective, which is focused on identifying and meeting the needs of women, infants, children, adolescents, and families. We will examine problems, programs, and policies related to these populations, with an emphasis on the United States. This course will use the life course perspective to examine how social, economic, and political context affect health and development over a lifetime. We will investigate select current topics in-depth (such as infant mortality, contraception, maternity care, and asthma), as well as cross-cutting issues such as the impact of racism and poverty on the health of families.

Winter 2018
12/26-1/20

DEPARTMENTAL

COMM 288 – Gender, Sex and Representation
Sut Jhally

This course will examine the relationship between commercialized systems of representation and the way that gender and sexuality are thought of and organized in the culture. In particular, we will look at how commercial imagery impacts upon gender identity and the process of gender socialization. Central to this discussion will be the related issues of sexuality and sexual representation (and the key role played by advertising).

ENGLISH 132 – Gender, Sexuality, Literature and Culture
Anna Piecuch

Literature treating the relationship between man and woman. Topics may include: the nature of love, the image of the hero and heroine, and definitions, past and present, of the masculine and feminine.

PSYCH 391GM – Gender and Mental Health
Hillary Halpern

This course explores some of the ways in which mental health and illness vary according to gender identity. We also explore some of the differences in how women, men, transgender and gender non-conforming patients encounter and experience mental health treatment.

SOC 222 – The Family
Ghazah Abbasi

First part: historical transformations in family life (relationships between husbands and wives, position and treatment of children, importance of kinship ties); second part: the contemporary family through life course (choice of a mate, relations in marriage, parenthood, breakup of the family unit).

SOC 395K – Domestic Violence
Laura Hickman

Prior to the 1970s, domestic violence in America was widely viewed as a private matter in which public intervention was inappropriate except under the most extreme circumstances. Over the past several decades, however, domestic violence has been increasingly perceived and responded to by the public as a criminal matter. Take a detailed look at patterns and trends in domestic violence in contemporary America, explore theoretical perspectives about its causes, and examine the domestic violence reform movement, paying special attention to research that tries to assess the actual effectiveness of criminal justice reforms in reducing domestic violence.

COMPONENT

(WGSS majors and minors must concentrate their work on gender.  100-level courses count towards the WGSS minor but not the WGSS major)

AFROAM 151 – Literature and Culture
Carlyn Ferrari

Relevant forms of Black cultural expressions contributing to the shape and character of contemporary Black culture; the application of these in traditional Black writers. Includes: West African cultural patterns and the Black past; the transition-slavery, the culture of survival; the cultural patterns through literature; and Black perceptions versus white perceptions.

HISTORY 154 – Social Change in the 1960s
Julia Sandy-Bailey

Few questions in American history remain as contentious as the meanings of the 1960s. Observers agree that it was a very important time, but they are deeply divided as to whether it ushered in a needed series of social changes, or whether the Sixties were a period marked mainly by excess, chaos, and self-indulgence. There is not even agreement about when the Sixties began and ended. This course will build on the concept of the "Long Sixties," a period stretching from roughly 1954 to 1975. It will focus on topics that relate to struggles for social change: the civil rights movement, the peace movement, gender and sexuality, alternative lifestyles, identity politics, the counterculture, cultural production, and debates over multiculturalism.

SPRING 2018
DEPARTMENTAL

(100-level courses count towards the WGSS minor but not the major)

ENGLISH 132 – Gender, Sexuality, Literature and Culture
Nirmala Iswari

Literature treating the relationship between man and woman. Topics may include: the nature of love, the image of the hero and heroine, and definitions, past and present, of the masculine and feminine.

LEGAL 297R – Gender, Law and Politics
Lisa Solowiej

This course explores legal constructions of gender by introducing case law, federal legislation, news stories, and scholarly essays concerning sexual inequality in the United States. Special attention will be paid to grassroots movements, particularly those surrounding suffrage, reproduction, sexual activity, and marriage. We will explore how the legal system, through regulation, has changed gender relations for both women and men concerning marriage, divorce, work, and family. We will also consider how these struggles for equality have varied across race, religion, sexual identity, and class with particular attention to feminist critiques of economic inequality.

POLISCI 297GL – Gender, Law and Politics
Lisa Solowiej

This course explores legal constructions of gender by introducing case law, federal legislation, news stories, and scholarly essays concerning sexual inequality in the United States. Special attention will be paid to grassroots movements, particularly those surrounding suffrage, reproduction, sexual activity, and marriage. We will explore how the legal system, through regulation, has changed gender relations for both women and men concerning marriage, divorce, work, and family. We will also consider how these struggles for equality have varied across race, religion, sexual identity, and class with particular attention to feminist critiques of economic inequality.

PSYCH 391M – Women’s Mental Health
Hillary Halpern

See department for description. 

COMPONENT

(WGSS majors and minors must concentrate their work on gender.  100-level courses count towards the WGSS minor but not the WGSS major)

EDUC 210 – Social Diversity in Education
Instructor:  TBA

Focus on issues of social identity, social and cultural diversity, and societal manifestations of oppression. Draws on interdisciplinary perspectives of social identity development, social learning theory, and sociological analyses of power and privilege within broad social contexts.

HISTORY 264 – History of Health Care and Medicine in the U.S.
Elizabeth Sharpe

This course explores the history and social meaning of medicine, medical practice, health care, and disease in the United States from 1600 to the present. Using a variety of sources aimed at diverse audiences students will investigate topics such as: the evolution of beliefs about the body; medical and social responses to infectious and chronic disease; the rise of medical science and medical organizations; the development of medical technologies; mental health diagnosis and treatment; changing conceptions of the body; the training, role, and image of medical practitioners and the role of public and government institutions in promoting health practices and disease treatments. We will pay particular attention to the human experience of medicine, with readings on the experience of being ill, the delivery of compassionate care, and the nature of the relationship between practitioners and patients. Course themes will include race, gender, cultural diversity, women and gender, social movements, science, technology, politics, industry, and ethics.

PUBHLTH 389 – Health Inequities
Alice Fiddian-Green

While the health and wellbeing of the nation has improved overall, racial, ethnic, gender and sexuality disparities in morbidity and mortality persist. To successfully address growing disparities, it is important to understand social determinants of health and translate current knowledge into specific strategies to undo health inequalities. This course will explore social justice as a philosophical underpinning of public health and will consider the etiology of disease rooted in social conditions. It aims to strengthen critical thinking, self-discovery, and knowledge of ways in which socioeconomic, political, and cultural systems structure health outcomes.

SOC 248 – Conformity and Deviance
Janice Irvine

This course examines the social processes of rule-making and rule-breaking, and how categories of "normal" and "deviance" change historically. We examine different theories of conformity and deviance, using topics such as sexuality and politics.

SWAG 200- Feminist Theory
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:50 p.m.
Sahar Sdjadi

In this course we will investigate contemporary feminist thought from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. We will focus on key issues in feminist theory, such as the sex/gender debate, sexual desire and the body, the political economy of gender, the creation of the "queer" as subject, and the construction of masculinity, among others. This course aims also to think through the ways in which these concerns intersect with issues of race, class, the environment and the nation.

SWAG 220 – Queer Theory and Practice
Thursday  2:30-5:00 p.m.
Khary Polk

“Queer Theory and Practice” is an interdisciplinary methods course designed to complement the existing SWAG core sequence. Using theories and approaches from the discipline of performance studies, the explicit mission of the seminar is to acquaint students with the study of LGBT history, politics, and culture while also strengthening student research skills in four overlapping areas: archival research, close-reading, performance analysis, and community engagement-as-activism. Course activities include working in the Amherst College Frost Archives, the production of a performance piece, and structured engagement with contemporary LGBT activism in the Pioneer Valley and the larger world.

SWAG 224/EUST 224/HIST 224 – The Century of Sex: Gender and Sexual Politics in Modern Europe
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:20 a.m.
April Trask

In the 1920s and 30s, authoritarian and fascist states across Europe declared that sexuality was not private. Sexual choices in the bedroom, they claimed, shaped national identities and the direction of social and cultural development. Through a variety of programs, propaganda and legal codes, states such as Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy sought to regulate sexual behavior and promote specific gender roles and identities. The intervention of the state in the intimate lives of citizens in the twentieth century, however, was rooted in the transformations of state, culture and economy that took place long before the speeches of great dictators. This course explores the cultural debates surrounding sexual practices, medical theories of gender and sexuality, and the relationship between sexuality and state that shaped European societies in the twentieth century. In case studies from across the continent, the course explores a range of topics, including but not limited to the history of sex reform, prostitution, homosexuality, venereal disease, contraception, abortion, the “New Woman” and sexual emancipation movements, sexual revolutions and reactionary movements and reproductive politics, among others. Students will explore how seemingly self-evident and unchanging categories – feminine and masculine, straight and gay, “normal” and “deviant”– have taken shape and changed over time, and how historical processes (modernization, imperialism, urbanization) and actors (social movements, sex reformers, nationalist groups and states) sought to define and regulate these boundaries in the so-called “century of sex.”

SWAG 239/RELI 261 – Women in Judaism
Monday  2:00-4:30 p.m.
Susan Niditch

A study of the portrayal of women in Jewish tradition. Readings will include biblical and apocryphal texts; Rabbinic legal (halakic) and non-legal (aggadic)material; selections from medieval commentaries; letters, diaries, and autobiographies written by Jewish women of various periods and settings; and works of fiction and non-fiction concerning the woman in modern Judaism. Employing an inter-disciplinary and cross-cultural approach, we will examine not only the actual roles played by women in particular historical periods and cultural contexts, but also the roles they assume in traditional literary patterns and religious symbol systems. This discussion course requires participants to prepare a series of closely argued essays related to assigned readings and films.

SWAG 335/ANTH 335 – Gender:  An Anthropological Perspective
Tuesday  1:00-3:30 p.m.
Deborah Gewertz

This seminar provides an analysis of male-female relationships from a cross-cultural perspective, focusing upon the ways in which cultural factors modify and exaggerate the biological differences between men and women. Consideration will be given to the positions of men and women in the evolution of society, and in different contemporary social, political, and economic systems, including those of the industrialized nations.

SWAG 353/ANTH 353 – Transgender Ethnographies
Wednesday  2:00-4:30 p.m.
Sahar Sadjadi

This course offers a cross-cultural study of gender transition and transgression. We will explore ethnographic studies of gender non-conforming lives in a variety of contexts around the world. Students will be encouraged to approach gender transition and gender non-conformity, and the role of the body in the production of sex and gender, through the synthesis of feminist, queer, and transgender theories. In addition to questions of appearance, body and identity, we will explore the social production of gendered roles, activities and relations across class, race, caste and religion. We will analyze the discursive and material conditions that have enabled the emergence of the category of “transgender” and its relation to other cultural categories of gender non-normative personhood. Finally, we will discuss the role of Western medical ideologies and technologies in shaping subjectivities as well as the convergence and divergence of medical diagnosis and identity. This seminar requires group student presentations during the semester and completion of an individual research project.

SWAG 411/POSC 411 – Indigenous Women and World Politics
Tuesday  2:30-5:00 p.m.
Manuela Picq

Indigenous women are rarely considered actors in world politics. Yet from their positions of marginality, they are shaping politics in significant ways. This course inter-weaves feminist and Indigenous approaches to suggest the importance of Indigenous women’s political contributions. It is an invitation not merely to recognize their achievements but also to understand why they matter to international relations. This course tackles varied Indigenous contexts, ranging from pre-conquest gender relations to the 1994 Zapatista uprising. We will learn how Indigenous women played diplomatic roles and led armies into battle during colonial times. We will analyze the progressive erosion of their political and economic power, notably through the introduction of property rights, to understand the intersectional forms of racial, class, and gender violence. Course materials explore the linkages between sexuality and colonization, revealing how sexual violence was a tool of conquest, how gender norms were enforced and sexualities disciplined. In doing so, we will analyze indigenous women’s relationship to feminism as well as their specific struggles for self-determination. We will illustrate the sophistication of their current activism in such cases as the Maya defense of collective intellectual property rights. As we follow their struggles from the Arctic to the Andes, we will understand how indigenous women articulate local, national, and international politics to challenge state sovereignty.

SWAG 452/EUST 452/ARHA 452 – The Earthly Paradise
Tuesday  1:00-3:30 p.m.
Natasha Staller

Shortly after the Franco-Prussian War--when there were more bloody corpses in the streets of Paris than at the height of the French Revolution--Monet and some others invented Impressionism. Rather than grab horror by the throat, as Goya and Picasso did in Spain, they created an earthly paradise. To this end, some ecstatically immersed themselves in nature; others tapped the gas-lit pleasures of the demi-monde. We will revel in the different visions of Monet, Degas, Renoir, as well as of Van Gogh, Gauguin, Cézanne, Toulouse-Lautrec, Matisse--the Symbolist and Fauvist artists who followed. We will feast on the artists’ images, originals whenever possible (including Monet’s Matinée sur la Seine at the Mead). We will study their words--Van Gogh’s letters, Gauguin’s Noa Noa, Matisse’s “Notes of a Painter”--and analyze the ways in which they transformed their experiences into art.  There will be at least one required field trip, on a Friday. This is a research seminar: each student will choose an artist, whose paradise she will study in depth, and share as a class presentation and substantial paper.

ANTH 238 – Culture, Race and Reproductive Health
Monday  12:30-1:50 p.m.
Haile Cole

This course concerns the reproductive health experiences, including those focused on sexuality, birth, and motherhood, of women in the United States. It explores the relationship between these experiences and the fact of having a black female body (as was first constructed under slavery). It also explores the complex relationship between women’s reproductive experiences and their contemporary racial and socioeconomic locations in American society. The aim is to garner a thorough and sophisticated understanding of why “reproductive justice” is elusive in the contemporary United States and to consider what might be done about it.

BLST 446 - Radical Black Imagination
Wednesday  2:15-5:15 p.m.
Dominique Hill

What relationships connect education, self-actualization, and transgressive acts?  How can body centric and Black feminist pedagogies help us (re)imagine education?  What insights and possibilities emerge from placing imagination, transgression, and education in conversation?  "The Radical Black Imagination" ruminates on these questions.  By studying texts and pedagogical practices of Black feminists, in particular, this course endeavors to illuminate under-explored pathways of freedom and transgression as educative tools. The course entails class discussion, engagement with artistic mediums, translation of traditional texts into creative and transgressive terms, as well as opportunities to put the pedagogical theories covered in the course into practice.  The course will culminate with a collective public presentation.

CS 257 – Critical Pedagogy of place:  A tool for environmental action and social change
Tuesday, Thursday  2:00-3:20 p.m.

Timothy Zimmerman
component

In this advanced course on environmental education, we will read seminal works on notions of place (Thoreau; Leopold), critical pedagogy (Freire), place-based (Sobel), critical theory (hooks), queer ecology (Mortimer-Sandilands), and ecophilosophy. We will also read modern thinkers such as Gruenwald/Greenwood, Berry, Gough, and non-white, indigenous and gender diverse scholars LaDuke, Taylor, Hoffner and others. We will spend time in "places" (possibly including a field trip, or two) to investigate our own notions and perceptions thereof to connect the theory and practice. Students in this class will also participate in a whole-class, semester-long activity.

CSI 165 – Gender and Economic Development
Monday, Wednesday  10:30-11:50 a.m.
Lynda Pickbourn

This course examines the often contradictory impacts of the process of economic development on gender relations in developing countries and asks: what challenges do global economic trends pose for gender equality and equity in developing countries? To answer this question, we will begin with an introduction to alternative approaches to economics and to economic development, focusing on the differences between neoclassical and feminist economics. We will then go on to examine and critique the theoretical frameworks that have shaped the gender perspective in economic development. This will be followed by an exploration of the impacts of economic development policy on men and women and on gender relations in Africa, Asia and Latin America, in the context of a globalizing world economy. Special topics will include the household as a unit of analysis; women's unpaid labor, the gendered impacts of economic restructuring and economic crisis; the feminization of the labor force in the formal and informal sectors of the global economy. The course will conclude with an evaluation of tools and strategies for achieving gender equity within the context of a sustainable, human-centered approach to economic development.

CSI 222 – Race and the Queer Politics of the Prison State
Tuesday, Thursday  12:30-1:50 p.m.
Stephen Dillon

This course explores the history and politics of gender and sexuality in relation to the racial politics of prisons and the police. By engaging recent work in queer studies, feminist studies, transgender studies, and critical prison studies, we will consider how prisons and police have shaped the making and remaking of race, gender, and sexuality from slavery and conquest to the contemporary period. We will examine how police and prisons have regulated the body, identity, and populations, and how larger social, political, and cultural changes connect to these processes. While we will focus on the prison itself, we will also think of policing in a more expansive way by analyzing the racialized regulation of gender and sexuality on the plantation, in the colony, at the border, in the welfare office, and in the hospital, among other spaces, historical periods, and places.

CSI 270 – Young Revolutionaires:  Race, Gender, and Narratives of Emerging Political Consciousness
Monday  1:00-3:50 p.m.
Tammy Owens

Defining moments in girlhood and youth like fashioning different hairstyles and clothing are oftentimes inextricably linked to turning points in the development of one's political consciousness. This course explores the ways girls and women of color theorize the development of their political consciousness through these seemingly apolitical coming of age moments in the U.S. since 1920. Students will analyze personal narratives, oral histories, fiction, and plays that document early political trajectories of well-known figures such as bell hooks, Michelle Cliff, and Janet Mock and lesser-known figures. Students will examine the political trajectories of women (e.g., Beyonce) who came of age in the public eye. Course questions include: What are defining moments in the emerging political identities of girls of color? How does becoming aware of gender, race, and class differences during youth impact the development of political identity? How have social movements influenced the political identities of girls of color?

HACU 259 – Woolf and Her Circles:; British Women Writers and Artists, 1918-1939
Wednesday  9:00-11:50 a.m.
Lise Sanders

Best known for her experiments with form and style in the modernist novel, Virginia Woolf was also deeply engaged with the literary and artistic currents of her time. This course addresses the lesser-known women writers and artists who worked alongside Woolf, both in the Bloomsbury Group and in overlapping activist circles. We will investigate how Woolf grapples with questions central to her contemporaries, including the psychic and social damage wrought by WWI; alternatives to conventional understandings of gender, sexuality, marriage, and domesticity; and the role of women in shaping new visions of a more equitable and just future. We will challenge notions of canonization in reading the work of Vanessa Bell, Vera Brittain, Radclyffe Hall, Winifred Holtby, Dorothy Sayers, and Rebecca West alongside Woolf's writings and those of the male modernists with whom she is often associated. Several shorter papers and a longer project will be required, and students will be encouraged to conduct research in local and digital archives.
 

IA 255 – Embodying Genders, Engendering Bodies
Monday, Wednesday  1:00-3:20 p.m.
Djola Branner

This workshop course explores principles of acting through the lens of contemporary American drama, and simultaneously pushes our perceptions of gender. In addition to expanding physical awareness, vocal expression and relaxation & focus, we will consider the ever-changing historical, cultural and social landscapes that have defined and continue to define male, female and gender non-conforming identities, and develop a vocabulary for translating those identities to the stage. The curriculum is designed to deepen an understanding of how we express our own genders, and to develop a facility for embodying characters who experience and express gender differently than we do.

IA 261 – Strange, Marvelous and Uneasy:  A Fiction Workshop Centering on Women
Tuesday  6:00-8:50 p.m.
Nathalie Arnold

The course is designed for creative writers interested in the 'literary magical,' in women's visions, and in discovering the richness of their own imaginations - in a powerful literary vein that will adhere to conventions of no particular genre. Students will be asked to: reimagine the real; write the future, the past, or the now, as they flourish in their own imaginarium; and discover what strange and unique visions might invigorate their writing. We will focus on works by women who, while often obscured in discussions of surrealism, have long been engaged in 'writing the world askew.' Students' writing will be guided by the readings. Authors we will read include writers from Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, and North America. Possible readings by: Lesley Nneka Arimah, Ramona Ausubel, Leonora Carrington, Shelly Jackson, Shirley Jackson, Kelly Link, Nobuka Takagi, Clarice Lispector, Helen Oyeyemi, Silvina Ocampo, Nnedi Okorafor, and Ali Smith.

IA 302 – Difficult Women:  An Intersectional Feminist Reading and Writing Experiment
Friday  1:00-3:50 p.m.
Nathalie Arnold

This seminar course will take as its starting point the idea that all women's lives are complex, valuable, and interesting, and that creative writers can benefit from closely and courageously imagining, exploring, and textualizing them. Our readings will focus on women writers whose work - including biography, philosphy, poetry, and fiction - is considered 'difficult' - strange, complicated and provocative. We will use these writings as a springboard for our own weekly written work. Formal assignments include 2 class presentations and 3 revised creative writing pieces. Among the authors to be considered are: Audre Lorde, Helene Cixous, Irena Klempfisz, Assata Shakur, Maria Ndiaye, bell hooks, May Sarton, Maggie Nelson, Sandra Cisneros, Warsan Shire, and Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha.

GNDST 201- Methods and Practices in Feminist Scholarship
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Jacquelyne Luce

This is a class about doing research as a feminist. We will explore questions such as: What makes feminist research feminist? What makes it research? What are the proper objects of feminist research? Who can do feminist research? What can feminist research do? Are there feminist ways of doing research? Why and how do the stories we tell in our research matter? Some of the key issues and themes we will address include: accountability, location, citational practices and politics, identifying stakes and stakeholders, intersectionality, inter/disciplinarity, choosing and describing our topics and methods, and research as storytelling. The class will be writing intensive and will culminate in each student producing a research portfolio.

GNDST 204EM/GRMST 231EM/CST 249EM – Embodiment in Theory:   Precarious Lives from Marx to Butler
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Karen Remmler

We examine the writing of major nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first century theorists, such as Marx, Nietzche, Freud, Dubois, Arendt, Fanon, Foucault, Butler, and others through the lens of embodiment. Rather than read theory as an abstract entity, we explore how theory itself is an embodiment of actual lives in which human beings experience life as precarious. What are the social conditions that create vulnerable bodies? How do thinkers who lived or are living precarious lives represent these bodies? Through a series of case studies based on contemporary examples of precarity, we examine the legacy and materiality of critical social thought.

GNDST 204GV/SPAN 230GV – Gendered Violence in Spain
Monday, Wednesday  11:00-12:15 p.m.
Nieves Romero-Diaz

This survey course will review the complex interaction of gender and violence as a personal and institutional issue in Spain from Medieval times to the present. What are the ideological and sociocultural constructs that sustain and perpetuate violence against women? What are the forms of resistance women have put into play? Among the texts, we will study short stories by Lucanor (thirteenth century) and María de Zayas (seventeenth century), song by Bebé and movie by Boyaín (twentieth century), contemporary news (twenty-first century), and laws (from the thirteenth century to the present).

GNDST 204QT/ENGL 204QT – Queer and Trans Writing
Monday  7:00-9:50 p.m.
Andrea Lawlor

What do we mean when we say "queer writing" or "trans writing"? Are we talking about writing by queer and/or trans authors? Writing about queer or trans practices, identities, experience? Writing that subverts conventional forms? All of the above? In this course, we will engage these questions not theoretically but through praxis. We will read fiction, poetry, comics, creative nonfiction, and hybrid forms. Expect to encounter work that challenges you in terms of form and content. Some writers we may read include Ryka Aoki, James Baldwin, Tom Cho, Samuel R. Delany, kari edwards, Elisha Lim, Audre Lorde, Cherríe Moraga, Eileen Myles, and David Wojnarowicz.

GNDST 204TJ/CST249JT - Transforming Justice and Practicing Truth to Power: Critical Methodologies and Methods in Community Participatory Action Research and Accountability
Tuesday  1:15-4:05 p.m.

This course will offer an overview of select methodologies and methods from Community-based Participatory Action Research (CBPAR), Participatory Action Research (PAR), collaborative ethnography and other social justice research interventions such as radical oral history, grassroots research collectives, experimental digital archives, research and data justice networks and organizations. We will center on questions of "accountability"; that is, to whom, for whom, and to what end do processes of accountability serve those already in power? Moreover, we will investigate the chasms between academia and activism in order to explore the possibility of unlikely collaborative research alliances.

GNDST 206AW/AFCNA 341EM – African Women’s Work
Wednesday  7:00-9:50 p.m.
Holly Hanson

The power to produce food and reproduce society gave women significant public voice in African societies in the past. But over 200 years they lost that public voice and control over subsistence. Why, when women are still producing food and people, is the social and political voice of women so much less significant than it was before? We explore African womens' work of governing, production, and social reproduction across the tumultuous changes of the 20th century. The class seeks to provide an achievable yet challenging set of learning experiences for those who have no prior experience studying Africa, but also for those who have substantial previous engagement with African issues.

GNDST 206US/HIST 276 – U.S. Women’s History Since 1890
Tuesday, Thursday  1:15-2:30 p.m.
Mary Renda

This course introduces students to the major themes of U.S. women's history from the 1880s to the present. We will look both at the experiences of a diverse group of women in the U.S. as well as the ideological meaning of gender as it evolved and changed over the twentieth century. We will chart the various meanings of womanhood (for example, motherhood, work, the domestic sphere, and sexuality) along racial, ethnic, and class lines and in different regions, and will trace the impact multiple identities have had on women's social and cultural activism.

GNDST 210BD/RELIG 241 – Women and Buddhism
Tuesday, Thursday  2:40-3:55 p.m.
Susanne Mrozik

This course examines the contested roles and representations of Buddhist women in different historical and cultural contexts. Using a variety of ethnographic, historical, and textual sources, the course investigates both the challenges and opportunities Buddhist women have found in their religious texts, institutions, and communities.

GNDST 210SL/RELIG 207 – Women and Gender in Islam
Monday, Wednesday  11:00-12:15 p.m.
Amina Steinfels

This course will examine a range of ways in which Islam has constructed women--and women have constructed Islam. We will study concepts of gender as they are reflected in classical Islamic texts, as well as different aspects of the social, economic, political, and ritual lives of women in various Islamic societies.

GNDST 212CC/POLIT 233 – Introduction to Feminist Theory
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Elizabeth Markovits

This course explores the overlapping dualities of the feminine and the masculine, the private and the public, the home and the world. We examine different forms of power over the body; the ways gender and sexual identities reinforce or challenge the established order; and the cultural determinants of 'women's emancipation.' We emphasize the politics of feminism, dealing with themes that include culture, democracy, and the particularly political role of theory and on theoretical attempts to grasp the complex ties and tensions between sex, gender, and power.

GNDST 221QF – Feminist and Queer Theory
Monday, Wednesday  11:00-12:15 p.m.
Christian Gundermann

We will read a number of key feminist texts that theorize sexual difference, and challenge the oppression of women. We will then address queer theory, an offshoot and expansion of feminist theory, and study how it is both embedded in, and redefines, the feminist paradigms. This redefinition occurs roughly at the same time (1980s/90s) when race emerges as one of feminism's prominent blind spots. The postcolonial critique of feminism is a fourth vector we will examine, as well as anti-racist and postcolonial intersections with queerness. We will also study trans-theory and its challenge to the queer paradigm.

GNDST 241HP/ANTHR 216HP – Feminist Health Politics
Tuesday, Thursday  1:15-2:30 p.m.
Jacquelyne Luce

Health is about bodies, selves and politics. We will explore a series of health topics from feminist perspectives. How do gender, sexuality, class, disability, and age influence the ways in which one perceives and experiences health and the access one has to health information and health care? Are heteronormativity, cissexism, or one's place of living related to one's health status or one's health risk? By paying close attention to the relationships between community-based narratives, activities of health networks and organizations and theory, we will develop a solid understanding of the historical, political and cultural specificities of health issues, practices, services and movements.

GNDST 333AX/CST 349AX – Making Waves: Gender and Sexuality in Asian America
Tuesday, Thursday  1:15-4:05 p.m.
Jina B. Kim

Dragon ladies, lotus blossoms, geisha girls--the U.S. cultural imaginary is saturated with myths regarding Asian sexuality and gender. This interdisciplinary course intervenes into this dominant imaginary by exploring feminist and queer frameworks derived from Asian-American contexts: immigration, labor, racial stereotyping, militarization, citizenship, and so-called "terrorism." Through a mix of scholarly, creative, activist, and media texts, we will challenge preconceived notions about Asian Americans as regressive, repressed, or hyper-sexual, as well as examine the powerful counter-imaginaries offered within Asian American literature and culture.

GNDST 333FM/CST 249AE – Latina Feminisms
Tuesday  1:15-4:05 p.m.
Vanessa Rosa

What is Latina Feminism? How does it differ from and/or intersect with "other" feminisms? In this seminar, we will explore the relationship between Latina feminist theory, knowledge production, and social change in the United States. This interdisciplinary course explores Latina feminism in relation to methodology and epistemology through a historical lens. This will help us to better understand how Latina feminist approaches can inform our research questions, allow us to analyze women's experiences and women's history, and challenge patriarchy and gender inequality. We will explore topics related to knowledge production, philosophies of the "self," positionality, inequality, the body, reproductive justice, representation, and community. Our approach in this class will employ an intersectional approach to feminist theory that understands the interconnectedness between multiple forms of oppression, including race, class, sexuality, and ability. Central to seminar discussions and student learning is a substantial community-based learning requirement that will facilitate a deeper engagement and analysis of the relationship between the concepts we explore in the course. Our goal is to develop a robust understanding of how Latina feminist methodologies and epistemologies can be tools for social change.

GNDST 333GG/HIST 301RG – Race, Gender and Empire:  Cultural Histories of the United States and the World
Wednesday  1:15-4:05 p.m.
Mary Renda

Recent cultural histories of imperialism--European as well as U.S.--have illuminated the workings of race and gender at the heart of imperial encounters. This course will examine the United States' relationship to imperialism through the lens of such cultural histories. How has the encounter between Europe and America been remembered in the United States? How has the cultural construction of 'America' and its 'others' called into play racial and gender identities? How have the legacies of slavery been entwined with U.S. imperial ambitions at different times? And what can we learn from transnational approaches to 'the intimacies of empire?'

GNDST 333LA/SPAN 330FA – Writing as Women: Female Autobiographical Writings in Latin America
Wednesday  1:15-4:05 p.m.
Adriana Pitetta

Who speaks in a text? What relationship exists between literature, images and identity? How can we portray ourselves in specific socio-political contexts? How do women writers build themselves as authors in the context of a patriarchal literary tradition? How do they address problems of subjectivity, self-representation and self-legitimation? What are the challenges that the self-writing poses to women writers like a black Brazilian woman living in favelas who supports her family by digging through the garbage for paper and scraps to sell; a nun and poet during the colonial period in Mexico; a political prisoner and survivor from a Southern Cone concentration camp during the Argentinian dictatorship; K'iche' political activist and survivor of the Guatemalan Civil War? How do those challenges interact with those of other women writes with more privileged positions in their societies? The course focuses on a heterogeneous corpus of Latin American texts (novels, diaries, letters, poetry and memoirs) that display a literary female personae in a variety of contexts and how they shape the process of construction of woman as author in Latin America from the colonial period until now.

GNDST 333MA/CST 349MS – Multi-Species Justice?  Entangled Lives and Human Power
Thursday  1:15-4:05 p.m.
Christian Gundermann

How can we change animal exploitation and re-situate the human more equitably with other species? Through animal rights? Justice? Abolition? Dismantle human exceptionalism? Animal emancipation? Companionship? Co-existence? Stewardship? What are the uses and limits of the discourses from which critical animal studies borrows conceptually, for example: antiracism, feminism, disability studies, nationalism, transformative justice, and so on. We will explore different scenarios of human-nonhuman entanglements, such as training, rescue, the animal industrial complex, the politics of extinction, hunting, infection, predation, breeding/reproduction and others.

GNDST 333PA/FLMST 380PA/SPAN 340PA – Natural’s Not in It:  Pedro Almodovar
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Justin Crumbaugh

This course studies the films of Pedro Almodovar, European cinema's favorite bad boy turned acclaimed auteur. On the one hand, students learn to situate films within the context of contemporary Spanish history (the transition to democracy, the advent of globalization, etc.) in order to consider the local contours of postmodern aesthetics. On the other hand, the films provide a springboard to reflect on larger theoretical and ethical debates. For instance, what can a weeping transvestite teach us about desire? What happens when plastic surgery and organ transplants become metaphors? Under what circumstances, if any, can spectators find child prostitution cute?

GNDST 333RT/RELIG 352/CST 349RE – Body and Gender in Religious Traditions
Monday  1:15-4:50 p.m.
Susanne Mrozik

Do bodies matter in religious traditions? Whose bodies matter? How do they matter? By studying religious body ideals and practices, we examine the possibilities and problems different kinds of bodies have posed in religious traditions. Topics include religious diet, exercise, and dress; monasticism, celibacy, and sexuality; healing rituals, and slavery and violence. We pay special attention to contemporary challenges to problematic body ideals and practices coming from feminist, disability, postcolonial, queer, and trans theorists and activists.

GNDST 333ST/CST 349ST – Sissies, Studs and Butches: Racialized Masculinites, Effeminacy and Embodiments of Noncompliance
Monday  1:15-4:05 p.m.
Ren-yo Hwang

This course will investigate the racialization of masculinity (and the masculinization of race) as undergirded by heteropatriarchy, settler colonialism, militarized borders and imperialism. This course will center perspectives from various "Third World Solidarity" diasporas in order to challenge Western, hegemonic and inherent legacies of masculinity as modernity's (hu)man. Using critical race theory, feminist, queer/trans* of color critique (e.g., Wynter, Fanon, David Eng, José Muñoz), we will ask how whiteness (white supremacist masculinity) shapes and colors masculinity -- whether as exemplar, visible, illegible, failed, deviant and even toxic -- and what then falls outside of such a frame?

GNDST 333VR/FREN 351VR – Viragos, Virgins and Visionaries
Wednesday  1:15-4:05 p.m.
Christopher Rivers

In this course, we will study the three most celebrated French female saints: Jeanne d'Arc, Thérèse de Lisieux and Bernadette de Lourdes. Their stories are similar: ordinary young women to whom extraordinary things happened, who became symbols of France and inspired a rich verbal and visual iconography. Yet they are profoundly different: Joan was a warrior, Thérèse a memoirist, Bernadette a visionary. We will study the facts of their lives, in their own words and those of others, but also the many fictions, semi-fictions, myths and legends based on those lives. We will analyze a number of films and visual images as well as literary and non-literary texts in our attempt to understand these cases of specifically female, specifically French sainthood.

GNDST 333WH – What is a Woman?
Wednesday  1:15-4:05 p.m.
Veroniza Zebadua Yanez

What is a woman? French philosopher Simone de Beauvoir opened The Second Sex with this deceptively simple but, in effect, radical question. Beauvoir refuted essentialist substantiations of identity and interrogated -- through the categories of situation, ambiguity, and lived experience -- the politics of embodiment, freedom, and oppression. In this course, we bring her into conversation with feminist and trans* philosophers who have reflected on the political significance of sexual difference: Wittig, Irigaray, Lorde, Lugones, Butler, Bettcher, and Salamon. At the end of the course, we will re-assess our initial question and think about its resonance in feminist, trans* and intersex issues today.

GNDST 333WT – Witches in the Modern Imagination
Tuesday  1:15-4:05 p.m.
Erika Rundle

From the middle ages to the present day, witches have evoked both fear and fascination. Their fellowships (real or fantastic) challenged the prevailing power structures of church and state patriarchies and upset the ordered precepts of the modern world. This seminar offers an overview of the history of witchcraft in Atlantic cultures, with special attention to the early modern British and American colonial eras. We will examine figures of the witch in European art; religious and legal texts that document the persecution of sorcerers; and dramatic, literary, and cinematic representations of witches that have helped to shape our understanding of gender, nature, theatricality, and power.

ASIAN 147 – Chinese Women Writers in the 20th and 21st Century
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 p.m.
Ying Wang

In the last hundred years, China witnessed the emergence of many talented Chinese women writers. Not only did they take part in every stage of important socio-political changes in modern and contemporary China, they were and still are the avant-garde of literary reform and innovation. Many of their works, in particular, take gender and gender ideology/politics at issue, while deviating from the traditional discourse that marginalized or trivialized women, exploring creative and effective ways of literary dialogue and imagination. This course will cover women writers from both modern (1911-1949) and contemporary (1949-present) times. Some of the representative women writers include: Ding Ling, Xiao Hong, Zhang Ailing, Zong Pu, Yang Jiang, Wang Anyi, Tie Ning, etc.

SWG 270 – Oral History and Lesbian Subjects
Tuesday, Thursday  9:00-10:20 a.m.
Kelly P. Anderson

Grounding our work in the current scholarship in lesbian history, this course explores lesbian, queer and bisexual communities, cultures and activism. While becoming familiar with the existing narratives about lesbian/queer lives, students are introduced to the method of oral history as a key documentation strategy in the production of lesbian history. What are the gaps in the literature and how can oral history assist in filling in the spaces? What does a historical narrative that privileges categories of gender and sexuality look like? And how do we need to adapt our research methods, including oral history, in order to talk about lesbian/queer lives? Our texts include secondary literature on 20th-century lesbian cultures and communities, oral history theory and methodology, and primary sources from the Sophia Smith Collection (SSC). Students conduct, transcribe, edit and interpret their own interviews for their final project. The oral histories from this course will be archived.

SWG 271 – Reproductive Justice
Monday, Wednesday, Friday  1:10-2:30 p.m.
Carrie Baker

This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of reproductive health, rights and justice in the United States, examining history, activism, law, policy, and public discourses related to reproduction. A central framework for analysis is how gender, race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, disability and nationality intersect to shape people’s experiences of reproductive oppression and their resistance strategies. Topics include eugenics and the birth control movement; the reproductive rights and justice movements; U.S. population control policies; criminalization of pregnant people; fetal personhood and birth parents’ citizenship; the medicalization of reproduction; reproductive technologies; the influence of disability, incarceration and poverty on pregnancy and parenting; the anti-abortion movement; and reproductive coercion and violence.

SWG 314 – Documenting Queer Lives
Tuesday  1:00-4:00 p.m.
Jennifer Declue

This course examines visual and literary documentations of queer life by reading memoirs and screening short and feature length documentaries films. We consider the power and value of documenting queer lives while examining the politics of visibility as impacted by race, class and gender. We will attend to the expansiveness of the term “queer” and consider the performativity of gender and the fluidity of sexuality in our analysis of each text. Students will produce a short film, write a short biography or propose another mode of documenting experiences of queer life as members of, or in solidarity with, the LGBT community.

AFR 289 – Race, Feminism and Resistance in Movements for Social Change
Tuesday, Thursday  9:00-10:20 a.m.
Samuel Galen Ng

This interdisciplinary colloquial course explores the historical and theoretical perspectives of African American women from the time of slavery to the post-civil rights era. A central concern of the course is the examination of how black women shaped and were shaped by the intersectionality of race, gender and sexuality in American culture.

AFR 366 – The Politics of Grief
Thursday  3:00-4:50 p.m.
Samhel Galen Ng

What role has grief played in the black freedom struggle? How have conceptions of race and gender been articulated, expanded, and politicized through public performances of collective mourning? This seminar explores the ways in which post-emancipation black politics developed through efforts, often led by women, to not only challenge but to also embody and inhabit trauma. We will consider a range of theoretical texts alongside historical documents from the late nineteenth century to today.

AMS 201 – Introduction to the Study of American Society and Culture
Tuesday, Thursday  10:30-11:50 a.m.
Christen Mucher/Steve Waksman

An introduction to the methods and concerns of American studies. We draw on literature, painting, architecture, landscape design, social and cultural criticism, and popular culture to explore such topics as responses to economic change, ideas of nature and culture, America’s relationship to Europe, the question of race, the roles of women, family structure, social class and urban experience.

AMS 241 – Disability in Popular Culture
Tuesday, Thursday  3:00-4:20 p.m.
Sarah Orem

From butt-kicking warriors like Imperator Furiosa, to state leaders like New York governor David Paterson and former president FDR, to ultra-glamorous models like Jillian Mercado and Nyle DiMarco, images of and persons with disabilities have shaped the discourse of American popular culture. Though popular literary genres have long framed disability as tragic or pitiable, disabled writers have successfully appropriated popular, commercial styles to leverage critiques against dominant conceptions of disability. The purpose of this course is to investigate what arguments these popular texts make, whether implicitly or explicitly, about disability.

CLT 266 – Modern South African Literature and Cinema
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:50 p.m.
Katwiwa Mule

A study of South African literature and film with a focus on violence—political, economic, psychical, xenophobic, homophobic, etc. We explore the relationship between power and violence during- and post-apartheid and how race, class, gender, sexuality and ethnicity complicate the definition, conceptualization and critique of racial, political and gender-based violence in South Africa. Works may include Njabulo Ndebele’s “The Cry of Winnie Mandela,” André Brink’s “A Dry White Season,” Mahamo’s “The Last Grave at Dimbaza,” John Wood’s “Biko (Cry Freedom),” Athol Fugard’s “Tsotsi” and classics “The Voortrekkers” and “Sarafina.” We also look at Truth and Reconciliation Commission hearings testimony.

EAL 245 – Writing, Japan and Otherness
Monday, Wednesday  2:40-4:00 p.m.
Kimberly Kono

An exploration of representations of “otherness” in Japanese literature and film from the mid-19th century until the present. How was (and is) Japan’s identity as a modern nation configured through representations of other nations and cultures? How are categories of race, gender, nationality, class and sexuality used in the construction of difference? This course pays special attention to the role of “otherness” in the development of national and individual identities. In conjunction with these investigations, we also address the varied ways in which Japan is represented as “other” by writers from China, England, France, Korea and the United States. How do these images of and by Japan converse with each other? All readings are in English translation.

ENG 299 – Turn Novels into Films:  Imperialisms, Race, Gender and Cinematic Adaption
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:50 p.m.
Ambreen Hai

"Not as good as the book,” is a frequent response to film adaptations of novels. Adaptation studies, an interdisciplinary field that combines literary and film studies, rejects this notion of “fidelity” (how faithful a film is to its source) and instead reads literature and film as equal but different artistic and cultural forms, where the film may translate, transmute, critique, or re-interpret the novel. This course will look closely and analytically at some paired fiction and film adaptations that focus on issues of imperialism, race, class, and gender. We’ll begin with some classics (Austen’s Mansfield Park , Forster’s Passage to India ), move to international postcolonial fiction and film (Tagore’s Home and the World , Ondaatje’s English Patient ), and end with U.S. texts about non-white, hyphenated citizens (Lahiri’s Namesake , Stockett’s The Help ).

ENG 277 – Postcolonial Women Writers
Monday, Wednesday  1:10-2:30 p.m.
Ambreen Hai

A comparative study of 20th-century women writers in English from Africa, the Caribbean, South Asia and Australia. We read novels, short stories, poetry, plays and autobiography in their historical, cultural and political contexts as well as theoretical essays to address questions such as: How have women writers addressed the dual challenge of contesting sexism and patriarchy from within their indigenous cultures as well as the legacies of western imperialism from without? How have they combined feminism with anti-colonialism? How have they deployed the act of writing as cultural work on multiple counts: addressing multiple audiences; challenging different stereotypes about gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity? What new stories have they told to counter older stories, what silences have they broken? How have they renegotiated the public and the private, or called attention to areas often ignored by their male contemporaries, such as relations among women, familial dynamics, motherhood.

GOV 266 – Contemporary Political Theory
Monday, Wednesday, Friday  2:40-4:00 p.m.
Gary Lehring

A study of major ideas and theories of justice and rights since World War II. Beginning with the work of John Rawls and his critics, we move to examine the debates raised by Rawls in the works of other authors who take seriously his idea of building a just society for all. Special attention is paid to the politics of inclusion for groups based on race, gender, sexual orientation and ethnicity as their claims for rights/justice/inclusion present challenges to our rhetorical commitment to build a just and fair society for all.

GOV 269 – Politics of Gender and Society
Tuesday, Thursday  9:00-10:20 a.m.
Gary Lehring

An examination of gender and sexuality as subjects of theoretical investigation, historically constructed in ways that have made possible various forms of regulation and scrutiny today. We focus on the way in which traditional views of gender and sexuality still resonate with us in the modern world, helping to shape legislation and public opinion, creating substantial barriers to cultural and political change.

HST 209 – Women, Gender and Power in the Middle East
Tuesday, Thursday  10:30-11:50 a.m.
Mukaram Hhana

This course analyses the development of gender discourses and the lived experiences of women throughout the history of the region. The topics covered include the politics of marriage, divorce and reproduction; women’s political and economic participation; questions of masculinity; sexuality; the impact of Islamist movements; power dynamics within households; and historical questions around the female body. It provides an introduction to the main themes and offers a nuanced historical understanding of approaches to the study of gender in the region.

HST 253 – Women and Gender in Contemporary Europe
Monday, Wednesday  2:40-4:00 p.m.
Darcy Buerkle

Women’s experience and constructions of gender in the commonly recognized major events of the 20th century. Introduction to major thinkers of the period through primary sources, documents and novels, as well as to the most significant categories in the growing secondary literature in 20th-century European history of women and gender.

HST 263 – Women and Gender in Latin America
Tuesday, Thursday  10:30-11:50 a.m.
Diana Sierra Becerra

This course will use gender as an analytical lens to understand key themes and periods of Latin American history, from the pre-Columbian era to present-day neoliberalism. Drawing from a variety of methodological approaches, the course will illuminate how gender has shaped social relationships, institutions, identities, and discourses in the region. It will prioritize the role of women and how their individual and collective actions have impacted Latin America. Special attention will be paid to the racial and class differences among women, and their social movement participation.

HST 278 – Decolonizing U.S. Women’s History 1848-Present
Wednesday, Friday  2:40-4:00 p.m.
Jennifer Guglielmo

Survey of women’s and gender history with women of color, working-class women and immigrant women at the center and with a focus on race, class and sexuality. Draws on feminist methodologies to consider how the study of marginalized women’s lives changes our understanding of history, knowledge, culture and the politics of resistance. Topics include labor, racial formation, empire, im/migration, popular culture, citizenship, education, religion, medicine, war, consumerism, feminism, queer cultures, capitalism and neoliberalism. Emphasis on class discussion, analysis of original documents, and the emerging, celebrated scholarship in the field of U.S. women’s history alongside classic texts.

HST 350 – Gender, Race and Fascism
Wednesday  7:30-9:30 p.m.
Darcy Buerkle

This course will be organized around several central questions: What is the history of fascism and how does it matter? How can we historicize and understand the critical currency of gendered and racialized categories at the center of fascist ideologies? Students will develop a clear understanding of how historians have studied fascism through primary and secondary reading, as well as an examination of relevant visual culture.

HST 383 – Research in United States Women’s History:  Domestic Worker Organizing
Tuesday  1:00-4:00 p.m.
Jennifer Guglielmo

This is an advanced community-based research seminar in which students work closely with archival materials from the Sophia Smith Collection and other archives to explore histories of resistance, collective action and grassroots organizing among domestic workers in the United States, from the mid-19th century to the present. This work has historically been done by women of color and been among the lowest paid, most vulnerable and exploited forms of labor. We work closely with and in service of several organization of women of color, immigrant women and families, helping them to use history as an organizing tool in their current campaigns. This means meeting with domestic work organizers in person and virtually, collecting archival materials for them, and making the materials accessible in an online interactive timeline and other formats.

IDP 208 – Women’s Medical Issues
Tuesday, Thursday  9:00-10:20 a.m.
Leslie Jaffe

A study of topics and issues relating to women’s health, including menstrual cycle, contraception, sexually transmitted infections, abortion, mental health, nutrition, osteoporosis, the media’s representation of women and gender bias in health care. Social, cultural, ethical and political issues are considered, as well as an international perspective.

ITL 344 – Women in Italian Society:  Yesterday, Today and tomorrow
Tuesday, Thursday  10:30-11:50 a.m.

Giovanna Bellesia

This course provides an in-depth look at the changing role of women in Italian society. Authors studied include Natalia Ginzburg, Elsa Morante, Dacia Maraini and Elena Ferrante. A portion of the course is dedicated to the new multicultural and multiethnic Italian reality with a selection of texts written during the last 20 years by contemporary women immigrants. Limited enrollment. Permission of the instructor required. Conducted in Italian.

REL 227 – Women and Gender in Jewish History
Tuesday, Thursday  10:30-11:50 a.m.
Lois Dubin

An exploration of Jewish women’s changing social roles, religious stances and cultural expressions in a variety of historical settings from ancient to modern times. How did Jewish women negotiate religious tradition, gender and cultural norms to fashion lives for themselves as individuals and as family and community members in diverse societies? Readings from a wide range of historical, religious, theoretical and literary works in order to address examples drawn from Biblical and rabbinic Judaism, medieval Islamic and Christian lands, modern Europe, America and the Middle East.

SOC 213 – Race and National Identity in the United States
Monday, Wednesday  9:00-10:20 a.m.
Ginetta Candelario

The sociology of a multiracial and ethnically diverse society. Comparative examinations of several American groups and subcultures.

SOC 237 – Gender and Globalization
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:50 p.m.
Payal Banerjee

This course engages with the various dimensions of globalization through the lens of gender, race and class relations. We study how gender and race intersect in global manufacturing and supply chains as well as in the transnational politics of representation and access in global media, culture, consumption, fashion, food, water, war and dissenting voices.

SOC 253 – Sociology of Sexuality:  Institutions, Identities and Cultures
Monday, Wednesday  2:40-4:00 p.m.
William Albertson

This course examines sexuality from a sociological perspective, focusing on how sexuality is constructed by and structures major social institutions. We examine the social construction of individual and collective identities, norms and behaviors, discourses, institutional regulation, and the place of sexuality in the state, education, science and other institutions, and social movements. Consideration of gender, race, class, time and place are integrated throughout. Topics include the social construction of sexual desire and practice, sexuality and labor, reproduction, science, technology, sexuality and the state, sexuality education, globalization, commodification, and social movements for sexual purity, sexual freedom and against sexual violence.

SOC 323 – Sexuality and Social Movements in Conservative Times
Tuesday  1:00-2:50 p.m.
Nancy Whittier

This course can be repeated once for credit with a different topic and instructor. Enrollment limited to 12. This class focuses on challenges to and changes in gender and sexuality during conservative time periods. Focusing on the U.S., we will primarily examine the 1980s and the contemporary period as case studies. We will look how political and other institutions affect gender and sexuality, and at social movements addressing gender and sexuality from both the right and the left. We will look at movements including queer, feminist, anti-racist, anti-interventionist movements on the left, and racial supremacist, pro-military intervention, anti-LGBT, and conservative evangelical movements on the right. Theoretical frameworks are drawn from social movements, intersectional feminist, and queer theories.

SOC 327 – Global Migration in the 21st Century
Tuesday  3:00-4:50 p.m.
Payal Banerjee

This course provides an in-depth engagement with global migration. It covers such areas as theories of migration, the significance of global political economy and state policies across the world in shaping migration patterns and immigrant identities. Questions about imperialism, post-colonial conditions, nation-building/national borders, citizenship and the gendered racialization of immigration intersect as critical contexts for our discussions.

SPN 332 – Islam in the West
Tuesday, Thursday  3:00-4:50 p.m.
Ibtissam Bouachrine

This transdisciplinary course examines the intimate, complex and longstanding relationship between Islam and the West in the context of the Iberian Peninsula from the Middle Ages until the present. Discussions focus on religious, historical, philosophical and political narratives about the place of Islam and Muslims in the West. Students are also invited to think critically about “convivencia,” “clash of civilizations,” “multiculturalism” and other theories that seek to make sense of the relationship between Islam and the West.

THE 319  - Shamans, Shapeshifters and the Magic If
Tuesday 3:00-4:50 p.m.
Andrea Hairston

To act, to perform is to speculate with your body. Theatre is a transformative experience that takes performer and audience on an extensive journey in the playground of the imagination beyond the mundane world. Theatre asks us to be other than ourselves. We can for a time inhabit someone else’s skin, be shaped by another gender or ethnicity, become part of a past epoch or an alternative time and space similar to our own time but that has yet to come. As we enter this “imagined” world we investigate the normative principles of our current world. This course investigates the counterfactual, speculative, subjunctive impulse in overtly speculative drama and film with a particular focus on race and gender. We examine an international range of plays by such authors as Caryl Churchill, Tess Onwueme, Dael Orlandersmith, Derek Walcott, Bertolt Brecht, Lorraine Hansberry, Craig Lucas and Doug Wright, as well as films such as The Curious Case of Benjamin Button; Pan’s Labyrinth.