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Academics

Spring 2019 Courses

WGSS 187 – Gender, Sexuality and Culture
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Joy Hayward-Jansen

This course offers an introduction to some of the basic concepts and theoretical perspectives in Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies. Drawing on disciplinary, interdisciplinary and cross-cultural studies, students will engage critically with issues such as gender inequities, sexuality, families, work, media images, queer issues, masculinity, reproductive rights, and history. Throughout the course, students will explore how experiences of gender and sexuality intersect with other social constructs of difference, including race/ethnicity, class, and age. Special attention will be paid to the ways in which interlocking systems of oppression have shaped and influenced the historical, cultural, social, political, and economical contexts of our lives, and the social movements at the local, national and transnational levels which have led to key transformations. (Gen. Ed. DU I 4 CR)

 

WGSS 201 – Gender and Difference:  Critical Analyses
Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.  – Adina Giannelli
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m   – Siyuan Yin

An introduction to the vibrant field of women, gender, and sexuality studies, this course familiarizes students with the basic concepts in the field and draws connections to the world in which we live. An interdisciplinary field grounded in commitment to both intellectual rigor and individual and social transformation, WGSS asks fundamental questions about the conceptual and material conditions of our lives. What are “gender,” “sexuality,” “race,” and “class?” How are gender categories, in particular, constructed differently across social groups, nations, and historical periods? What are the connections between gender and socio-political categories such as race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, (dis)ability and others? How do power structures such as sexism, racism, heterosexism, and classism and others intersect? How can an understanding of gender and power enable us to act as agents of individual and social change? Emphasizing inquiry in transnational feminisms, critical race feminisms, and sexuality studies, this course examines gender within a broad nexus of identity categories, social positions, and power structures. Areas of focus may include queer and trans studies; feminist literatures and cultures; feminist science studies; reproductive politics; gender, labor and feminist economics, environmental and climate justice; the politics of desire, and others. Readings include a range of queer, feminist and women thinkers from around the world, reflecting diverse and interdisciplinary perspectives in the field.

 

WGSS 205 – Feminist Health Politics
Monday, Wednesday 2:30-3:45 p.m.
Kirsten Leng
Distribution Requirement:  Sexuality Studies

What is health?  What makes health a matter of feminism?  And what might a feminist health politics look like?  These questions lay at the heart of this course.  In Feminist Health Politics, we will examine how health becomes defined, and will question whether health and disease are objectively measured conditions or subjective states.  We will also consider why and how definitions and standards of health have changed over time; why and how standards and adjudications of health vary according to gender, race, sexuality, class, and nationality; and how definitions of health affect the way we value certain bodies and ways of living.   Additionally, we will explore how knowledge about health is created; how environmental conditions, social location, politics, and economic conditions affect health; how various groups have fought for changes to health care practices and delivery; and how experiences of health and illness have been reported and represented.

 

WGSS 290C – History of Race and Sexuality in the U.S.
Monday, Wednesday  10:10-11:00

Friday discussions 9:05, 10:10, 12:20 and 1:25
Angie Willey
Distribution Requirement:  Critical Race Feminisms, Sexuality Studies

This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary feminist study of sexuality. Its primary goal is to provide a forum for students to consider the history of sexuality and race in the U.S. both in terms of theoretical frameworks within women’s and gender studies, and in terms of a range of sites where those theoretical approaches become material, are negotiated, or are shifted. The course is a fully interdisciplinary innovation. It will emphasize the links rather than differences between theory and practice and between cultural, material, and historical approaches to the body, gender, and sexuality. Throughout the course we will consider contemporary sexual politics from the science of sex and sexuality, to marriage debates in light of histories of racial and sexual formations. (Gen. Ed. HS, DU  4 CR)

 

WGSS 291L - Love-Politics, Self-Care and Feminist Discourse
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Fumi Okiji
Distribution Requirement:  Critical Race Feminism, Sexuality Studies

In this course we will explore the potential that love has for transforming relations with others, and with ourselves.  Drawing from feminist scholars and culturemakers, we will focus on both politics and imaginaries in order to come to an appreciation of the critical and utopian potentials that love and radical self-care hold. Our inquiries will be historically broad, taking in early black feminist educator and activist Anna Julia Cooper, jazz vocalists Billie Holiday and Abbey Lincoln, the Combahee River Collective, the Eternal Summer of the Black Feminist Mind school, contemporary scholars such as Alexis Pauline Gumbs and Jennifer Nash, and their creative counterparts, including Solange and Meshell Ndegeocello.

 

WGSS 293T - Latinx and Latin American Feminisms:  from #NiUnaMenos to #Metoo
Tuesday, Thursday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
Ana Maria Ospina Pedraza
Distribution Requirement:  Critical Race Feminisms, Transnational Feminisms

The current revival of feminist activism and the ‘mainstreaming’ of feminist rhetoric and symbolism are not solely US phenomena. In the last four years, Argentina has experienced one of the most vivid and far-reaching mobilizations in Latin America. And much like the #MeToo movement, Argentine women have mobilized crowds in the streets around a hashtag, #NiUnaMenos. This class will be a theoretically-oriented survey of contemporary women’s organizing in the Americas, as well as some of their pivotal recent antecedents. We will proceed with the study of paradigmatic cases through a comparative lens, guiding our analysis and discussion with substantive issues in feminist theory and social movement organization. We will look at similarities, variation and transnational connections in feminist organizing, with particular attention to the analytical and political windows that open when we address debates on reproductive rights, sexuality, race, coloniality and nationality across the Americas.

 

WGSS 295C – Career and Life Choices
Monday  2:30-4:00 p.m.

Karen Lederer

Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies teaches critical thinking skills.  How can students use these skills to make informed career choices?  How is it possible to engage in planning one’s career while conscious of the realities of race, gender, sexuality, and class in today’s economy?  What are career options for students whose values include working for a better society?  Is it possible to put together a balanced life and pay the bills besides?  How can pressured college seniors, particularly activists, get all the career tasks they need to do done (resume writing, budgeting, researching career opportunities, networking, informational interviews) while finishing out their college degree?  Students will formulate their own career questions and choices.  The first part of the semester is self awareness, articulating interests, skills and values.  The second part of the semester focuses on workforce information, practical job search skills, and research on a possible field.  Assignments include: self awareness exercises, informational interviews, budget, resume, cover letter, career research and more.

 

WGSS 295P/AFROAM 295P – Policing, Protest and Politics:  Queer, Feminisms and #BlackLivesMatter
Monday, Wednesday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
Adina Giannelli
Distribution Requirement:  Sexuality Studies, Critical Race Feminisms

Over the last five years, a powerful social movement has emerged, affirming to the country--and the world--that Black Lives Matter. Sparked by the killing of Trayvon Martin by George Zimmerman and Zimmerman's subsequent acquittal, as well as myriad police killings of other black men, women, and children, including Michael Brown, Rekia Boyd, and Freddie Gray, this movement contests police violence and other policing that makes black communities unsafe while challenging the imputation of race to crime. Police violence against black people, and the interrelated criminalization of black communities have history that precedes the formation of the United States. There is a similarly long and important history of activism and social movements against police violence and criminalization. Today, black people are disproportionately subject to police surveillance and violence, arrest, and incarceration. So, too, are other people of color, and queer, trans, and gender nonconforming people of all races but especially those of color. This course will examine the history of policing and criminalization of black, queer, and trans people and communities and related anti-racist, feminist, and queer/trans activism. In so doing, we will interrogate how policing and understandings of criminality -- or the view that certain people or groups are inherently dangerous or criminal -- in the U.S. have been deeply shaped by understandings of race, gender, and sexuality.

 

WGSS 295R - Reading the Body
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Laura Ciolkowski
Distribution Requirement:  Sexuality Studies, Critical Race Feminisms

This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of “the body” through the intersectional lens of women’s, gender, sexuality studies, critical race theory, social justice feminism, dis/ability studies, and queer theory.  What is the body and how is it shaped by and also entangled in systems of power?  In what ways is the body a political battleground and site for feminist struggle and resistance?  How do we define “deviant” and/or “pathological” bodies and which bodies get to count as “normal”?  How does our understanding of Nature and Culture, science and technology structure our beliefs about the body and gender, sexuality and race?  The course will explore a range of topics, including: Racial politics and reproductive justice; Gender-based violence, rape culture, and feminist activism; “Somatechnics,” cosmetic surgery and other forms of body modification; Dis/ability, dis-ease, and embodiment; Discipline, bio-power, surveillance, and the modern body; Race, gender, sexuality and the carceral state; Mass media, visual culture, and commodity capitalism; Transnational bodies and the politics of labor and migration; trans* politics and queer materialisms. 

 

WGSS 296L – Leadership Council
Time TBD – tentatively scheduled 1-2 times per month

Learn about the Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies department and how the University of Massachusetts functions.  Gain organizational and public relations skills in doing outreach to students at UMass.  Develop ideas for programming and work on implementation of new programs.  Develop promotional materials including social media, posters, and other printed matter.  Students will attend monthly meetings of leadership council, participate in outreach projects with other students, and develop individual projects. Enrollment by permission only. If you are interested in participating, send an email explaining your interest and a tentative project idea to Karen Lederer - lederer@wost.umass.edu.  Students can also participate as volunteers.

 

WGSS 296N - Independent Study - News and Nibbles:  Analyzing the Week's News
Thursday  9:00-9:50 a.m.
Karen Lederer/Banu Subramaniam

Join us for an informal, 1 credit weekly discussion of the news.  Be a part of lively discussions in this seminar with your classmates and friends.  We will look at headlines from a variety of sources and work together to think through the day's topics and employ feminist analysis to understand them.   Students will be expected to read the New York Times and other sources regularly, commit to leading discussions/presenting headlines, keep brief journals and do one presentation on a news topic.  This is a pass/fail class, with attendance and participation being key.  Come join us for engaging conversations on timely topics.

 

WGSS 297TC – Introduction to Transgender Studies
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Cameron Awkward-Rich
Distribution Requirement:  Sexuality Studies

While mainstream discourse tends to frame “transgender” as a perpetually new phenomenon, this survey of transgender studies will contextualize present-day conversations in a longer intellectual history. We will be guided by questions like: What does trans mean and how has its meaning been shaped by regimes of gender, racism, colonization, ableism, and medical and legal regulation? What have emerged as the main concerns of transgender studies/activism and how has trans studies interacted with more established academic fields? How have trans artists, activists, and scholars helped us to imagine other, more just worlds? By engaging with scholarship from multiple fields, as well as a range of creative work, we will map the emergence of “transgender” as both an object of knowledge and a way of knowing.

 

WGSS 391D/JUDAID 383 – Women, Gender, Judaism
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Susan Shapiro

Historically, the figure of the “Jew” has been thought of as male.  Making male experience normative has in turn shaped how Judaism itself has been understood.  Shifting the basic terms and focus to include attention to women, gender, and sexuality significantly re-shapes our understanding of both Judaism and of Jewish culture/history.   This course not only “fills in the blanks” of the missing women of Jewish history and tradition, but attends to questions of contemporary forms of Jewish women's and men’s gendered lives, identities and sexualities.   Beginning with the Bible, the course proceeds historically, concluding with contemporary views of and debates surrounding matters of gender and sexuality.

 

WGSS 391F - People of Color Feminisms
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Fumi Okiji
Distribution Requirement:  Sexuality Studies, Critical Race Feminisms

This course will examine writing by women, queer and trans of color scholars, with an emphasis on interventions from the US. We will consider how power relations, and resistive responses to oppression have been thought about by these scholars, and by their creative counterparts. Through a variety of analytics including political and affective economies, performativity, and performance, we will examine the correspondences and tensions both within and between these related but distinct schools of thought.   We will read from variety of thinkers and artists (literary, music, and visual) including Audre Lorde, Gloria Anzaldua, Lisa Lowe, Chela Sandoval, Jennifer Nash, Roderick Ferguson, E. Patrick Johnson, Jose Munoz, C. Riley Snorton, Cherrie Moraga, Janet Mock, Hannah Black, Wu Tsang, Moor Mother, Matana Roberts, Cameron Awkward-Rich and Maria Magdalena Campos Pons.

 

WGSS 395G – Gender, Sexuality, Race and the Law:  Critical Interventions
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Adina Giannelli
Distrubtion Requirement:  Sexuality Studies, Critical Race Feminisms

Drawing on U.S. Supreme Court jurisprudence, gender and sexuality studies, sociological literature, policy papers, documentary, and international law, we will examine the ways in which gender, sexuality, and race are constructed, contested, and regulated within legal, legislative, and juridical frameworks, across systems, spaces, and temporalities. Throughout this course, we will consider what the law is, what it does, how it operates to uphold systems of power and oppression and how it can be deployed in the service of intervention. More relevant issues and problems within civil rights, constitutional, family, and criminal law, considering topics including: the legal construction of race, gender, and sexuality; feminist approaches to the law of gender, sexuality, and race; the role of privacy, morality, and “rights” in the regulation of sexuality and the family; reproductive rights; adoption, bioethics, family formation, immigration, reproductive technologies, and violence; and finally, the relationship between legal intervention, critical race & feminist theory, activism, and praxis.

 

WGSS 393J – Critical Prison Studies
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Laura Ciolkowski
Distribution Requirement:  Critical Race Feminisms

There are currently over 2 million people living in prisons and jails across the United States – more incarcerated people per capita than any other country in the world.  What is the carceral state and how do particular gendered and racialized bodies get caught up in its logics?  How do gender, race, sexuality, and class shape systems of discipline, punishment, surveillance, and control?  What is “anti-carceral feminism” and what are some of the abolitionist critiques of the prison industrial complex?  This course approaches the issue of mass incarceration through the lens of feminist social justice theory, gender and sexuality studies, and critical race theory.  An intersectional and deeply interdisciplinary exploration of the carceral, the course draws on literature, memoir, film, history, social science, psychology, art and popular media to interrogate and explore the many dimensions of mass incarceration in the US.

 

WGSS 395F – Feminism, Comedy and Humor
Monday, Wednesday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
Kirsten Leng

The popularity of shows like Inside Amy Schumer and Broad City and the clout of performers such as Tina Fey, Amy Poehler, and Wanda Sykes have arguably put to rest the old stereotype that women aren't funny.  More importantly, they have all shown that comedy and humor can be vehicles for feminist messages.  In so doing, they have built upon a legacy established by performers, writers, directors, and activists extending back to feminism's "first wave."  In this course, we will examine the intersections of feminism, comedy, and humor, and will explore questions such as: Why and how have feminists used humor and comedy for political ends?  Why have feminists, and women more generally, been seen as inherently unfunny?  In what ways is comedy and humor gendered?  What roles do race, class, and sexuality play?  And is humor and comedy available to all feminists, and to all feminist causes, or do the stakes and effects vary according to one’s social position and subject matter?  In addition to analyzing a wide range of media, we will create and explore our own forms of feminist comedic interventions.

 

WGSS 597F/797F – South Asian Gender and Sexuality|
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Svati Shah
Distribution Requirement:  Sexuality Studies, Transnational Feminisms

This course will review major developments in feminist and sexuality-based social movements in South Asia since the turn of the twentieth century.  We will also explore the intersections of the politics of gender and sexuality in South Asia within the context of economic globalization policies that have been undertaken in the region since the early 1990s. The course readings will draw upon ethnographic studies, NGO reports, and theoretical critiques which examine economic globalization as an important structuring context for understanding changes in the ways in which the politics of gender and sexuality are constituted in the region. The course will explore these intersections by drawing from critiques of globalization, writings from South Asian feminist and LGBTQ movements, and contemporary social theory. While these critiques largely delineate global processes, the course will focus on the South Asian region to discern unique ways in which these processes find purchase with local histories and political formations. Specific case studies will include work on LGBT movements in the region, migration, feminism, communalism, legal reform, and the geopolitics of the region.

 

WGSS 494TI – Integrative Experience
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Svati Shah
Distribution Requirement:  Transnational Feminisms

Satisfies the Integrative Experience for primary WGSS majors OR the transnational feminisms requirement for the WGSS major or minor.  This course is about the framework of transnational women's and gendered activisms and scholarship. We will survey the field of transnational feminist research and praxis, locating structures of power, practices of resistance, and the geographies of development at work in a range of theories and social movements. The course will not only examine the implementation of feminist politics and projects that have sought to ensure some measurable social, cultural, and economic changes, but also explore the ways conceptions of the ‘global’ and ‘transnational' have informed these efforts. Students will have the opportunity to assess which of these practices can be applicable, transferable, and/or travel on a global scale. We will focus not only on the agency of individuals, but also on the impact on people's lives and their communities as they adopt strategies to improve material, social, cultural, and political conditions of their lives.  

 

WGSS 691B – Issues in Feminist Research
Wednesday  2:30-5:00 p.m.
Miliann Kang

This is a graduate seminar in feminist research, and constitutes a core course for students enrolled in the Graduate Certificate in Advanced Feminist Studies. Feminism has long been interested in a foundational way in questions of epistemology (how we know what we know) and research methodology (how we go about developing original research), because in its most recent incarnations, post-1968, it emerged as an academic formation that asked basic questions about disciplines: how did they invent a world without women? How was systemic bias built into its knowledge systems such that they made women, people of color, working class people, people outside the US and Europe (‘the West,’ as it came to be called, through an Orientalist bit of geographic folly), peasants, slaves, indigenous people, colonized people, (most) queers, trans folk and a great many others invisible? Obviously, in this endeavor feminists had help from many other fields and activist movements, which worked together across disciplines and movements to transform knowledge. In many ways, they won - no discipline or field of study is unchanged or untouched by these inquiries, although some are obviously more resistant than others. As this is a required course for graduate students enrolled in the Graduate Certificate in Feminist Studies, those students have priority for enrollment.  Please contact Linda Hillenbrand at lindah@umass.edu to add the course. 

 

WGSS 692T – Thinking with Feeling
Tuesday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Cameron Awkward-Rich

Traditionally, feeling has been regarded as private, internal, and subjective, a barrier to the production of knowledge. By contrast, in this seminar we will foreground feminist/queer/critical race approaches in order to ask: what does thinking with feeling allow us to know? Together, we will chart the multiple genealogies of affect theory; consider the role of feeling and affectivity in the production of race, gender, dis/ability, nation, and discipline; and attend to the structures of feeling that undergird existing scholarship. While the primary aim of this class is to track the emergence of feeling as both a method and an object of minoritized thought, we will also devote substantial attention to thinking with feeling as a means of generating our own critical and creative work.  Please contact Linda Hillenbrand at lindah@umass.edu to add this course.  This course counts as an elective for students in the Graduate Certificate in Advanced Feminist Studies program and will also fulfill a contemporary poetry literature requirement for ENGL MFA students.  Please specify if you are an English student or WGSS Certificate student when requesting to add the course. 

 

WGSS 797F/597F – South Asian Gender and Sexuality
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Svati Shah

This course will review major developments in feminist and sexuality-based social movements in South Asia since the turn of the twentieth century.  We will also explore the intersections of the politics of gender and sexuality in South Asia within the context of economic globalization policies that have been undertaken in the region since the early 1990s. The course readings will draw upon ethnographic studies, NGO reports, and theoretical critiques which examine economic globalization as an important structuring context for understanding changes in the ways in which the politics of gender and sexuality are constituted in the region. The course will explore these intersections by drawing from critiques of globalization, writings from South Asian feminist and LGBTQ movements, and contemporary social theory. While these critiques largely delineate global processes, the course will focus on the South Asian region to discern unique ways in which these processes find purchase with local histories and political formations. Specific case studies will include work on LGBT movements in the region, migration, feminism, communalism, legal reform, and the geopolitics of the region.

Major/Minor Distribution Requirements

UMASS Critical Race Feminisms Transnational Feminisms Sexuality Studies
WGSS 205 – Feminist Health Politics     X
WGSS 290C – History of Race and Sexuality in the U.S. X   X
WGSS 291L - Love-Politics, Self-Care and Feminist Discourse X   X
WGSS 293T - Latinx and Latin American Feminisms:  from #NiUnaMenos to #Metoo X X  
WGSS 295P – Policing, Protest and Politics:  Queer, Feminisms and #BlackLivesMatter X   X
WGSS 295R - Reading the Body X   X
WGSS 297TC – Introduction to Transgender Studies     X
WGSS 391F - People of Color Feminisms X   X
WGSS 393G – Gender, Sexuality, Race and the Law:  Critical Interventions X   X
WGSS 393J – Critical Prison Studies X    

WGSS 494TI – Unthinking the Transnational

Please note:  This course satisfies the Integrative Experience for BA-WoSt majors.  If not used for the IE, it can be used for the Transnational Feminisms distribution requirement.  

  X  
WGSS 597F/797F – South Asian Gender and Sexuality   X X
AFROAM 297V – African American TV Studies X    
AFROAM 326 – Black Women in U.S. History X    
ANTHRO 297SR – Sex, Reproduction and Culture     X
HISTORY 265H – U.S. LGBT and Queer History     X
HISTORY 393SI – Indigenous Women of North America X    
HISTORY 397RR – History of Reproductive Rights Law     X
HISTORY 397SC – Sex and the Supreme Court     X
HISTORY 450 – Junior Year Writing Seminar in History – De-Marginalizaing Race and Gender:  African American Women’s History X    
PSYCH 390ZZ – Psychology of the Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Experience     X
PORTUG 309 – Brazilian Women   X  
PUBHLTH 490J – Reproductive Justice     X
SOCIOL 287 – Sexuality and Society     X
Continuing and Professional Education (CPE) Critical Race Feminisms Transnational Feminisms Sexuality Studies
WGSS 205 - Feminist Health Politics     X
AMHERST COLLEGE Critical Race Feminisms Transnational Feminisms Sexuality Studies
COLQ 335 – Transgender Histories     X
SWAG 203/BLST 203/ENGL 216 – Women Writers of Africa    X  
SWAG 208/BLST 345/ENGL 276/FAMS 379 – Black Feminist Literary Traditions X    
SWAG 215 – (Self) Representations of Trans Identities      X
SWAG 236/SPAN 243 – Queer Migrant Imaginaries    X X
SWAG 246/BLST 246 – Introduction to Black Girlhood Studies X    
SWAG 279/BLST 202/ENGL 279 – Global Women’s Literature    X  
SWAG 301 – Queer Theory and Practice      X
SWAG 305/ANTH 300 - On Display:  Race and Reproduction in Film and Media X   X
SWAG 329/BLST 377/ENGL 368 – Bad Black Women X    
SWAG 351 – From Birth to Death: LGBTQ Life Trajectories      X
SWAG 400/POSC 407 – Contemporary Debates: Gender and Right-Wing Populism   X  
SWAG 411/POSC 411 – Indigenous Women and World Politics    X  
SWAG 469/ASLC 452/FAMS 322 – South Asian Feminist Cinema    X  
HAMPSHIRE COLLEGE Critical Race Feminisms Transnational Feminisms Sexuality Studies
CSI 168 – Decolonizing Black and Brown Bodies X   X
CSI 178 – Harlem Herstories:  A Women’s Cultural History of Harlem X    
CSI 208 – Queer Feelings:  The Emotional and Affective Life of Gender, Sexuality and Race     X
CSI 225 – From Choice to Justice:  The Politics of the Abortion Debate     X
CSI 308/HACU 308 – Research Methods in Africana and Feminist Studies X    
MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE Critical Race Feminisms Transnational Feminisms Sexuality Studies
GNDST 204CP/CST 249 – Trap Doors and Glittering Closets: Queer/Trans* of Color Politics of Recognition, Legibility, Visibility and Aesthetics X   X
GNDST 204QT/ENGL 219QT – Queer and Trans Writing      X
GNDST 206CG/HIST 296CG – Women and Gender in China    X  
GNDST 212HR – Human Rights Lab: Transnational Perspectives on LGBTQI and Women’s Rights    X X
GNDST 241HP/ANTHR 216HP – Feminist Health Politics      X
GNDST 333BD – Rethinking the Sexual Body      X
GNDST 333CF/CST 349CF -- Survived, Punished and (Un)Deserving: Feminist Participatory Action Research Against Carceral Feminisms X    
GNDST 333GS/PSYCH 319GS – Gender and Sexual Minority Health      X
GNDST 333HH/ASIAN 340 – Love, Gender-Crossing, and Women’s Supremacy: A Reading of The Story of the Stone    X  
SMITH COLLEGE Critical Race Feminisms Transnational Feminisms Sexuality Studies
SWG 238 – International Feminist Political Economy and Activism   X  
SWG 270 – Oral History and Lesbian Subjects      X
SWG 271 – Reproductive Justice      X
SWG 314 – Documenting Queer Lives      X
AFR 212 – Family Matters: Representations, Policy and the Black Family  X    
AFR 289 – Race, Feminism and Resistance in Movements for Social Change  X    
AMS 220 – Dance, Music, Sex, Romance      X
EAL 244 – Japanese Women’s Writing    X  
ENG 273 – Bloomsbury and Sexuality      X
FRN 230 – Women Writers of Africa and the Caribbean    X  
HST 270 – Gender and US Imperialism   X  
HST 371 – Remembering Slavery: A Gendered Reading of the WPA Interviews  X    
ITL 344 – Women in Italian Society: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow    X  
SOC 237 – Gender and Globalization   X  
SOC 253 – Sociology of Sexuality: Institutions, Identities and Cultures      X

 

AFROAM 297V – African American TV Studies
Wednesday  2:30-5:00
Demetria Shabazz

Media has played an important role in our society's ever-evolving constructions of race, especially in the 20th and 21st centuries. For African Americans, media representations typically involved exaggerated and negative depictions of black femininity and masculinity. This course will analyze and critique representations of African Americans in television genres - comedy, reality shows, dramas, and documentary / news - and explore the juxtaposition of external and internal representations of race and gender. Because African Americans created and attempted to sustain an advocacy television to project positive representations and to affirm and validate the existence and collective experiences of their race, African American counter-media production will be examined in this course. Guiding questions include: What are televisual representations of African Americans and what are the political and social implications of those representations? How do black and non-black audiences internalize these representations? What is African American media and who produces it?  Finally, we will analyze recent studies on Inclusion or Invisibility? Diversity in Entertainment that found just one-third of speaking characters were female (33.5%), despite the fact that women represent just over half the U.S. population. Just 28.3% of characters with dialogue were from non-white racial/ethnic groups, though such groups are nearly 40 percent of the U.S. population.

 

AFROAM 326 – Black Women in U.S. History
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Cecile Yezou

The history of African American women from the experience of slavery to the present. Emphasis on the effect of racist institutions and practices on women. The ways in which women organized themselves to address the needs of African Americans in general and their own in particular. The achievements of such leaders as Mary Church Terrell, Harriet Tubman, Ella Baker, and Mary McLeod Bethune as well as lesser known women.  (Gen.Ed. HS, DU)

 

ANTHRO 297SR – Sex, Reproduction and Culture
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Elizabeth Krause

 

This course explores and analyzes topics pertaining to sex, reproduction, and culture in the United States and abroad through a medical anthropology lens. We cover themes of reproductive agency, contraception, reproductive politics, and more through an approach of the life course. Articles, films, news reports, and other materials will be used to discuss weekly case studies corresponding to each thematic topic. As a designated "service-learning" course endorsed by the office of Civic Engagement and Service-Learning (CESL) at UMass Amherst, this course provides opportunities for students to engage in service  beyond the classroom. Appropriate input from a community partner will guide the service, designed to contribute to the public good, and inform topics discussed throughout the semester. It also serves as a foundational course for the certificate in Reproductive Health, Rights and Justice (RHRJ).

 

AFROAM 397T/THEATER 397A - Theatrical Jazz, Ritual Performance, and African(ist) Aesthetics
Monday  10:10-1:10
Nia Witherspoon

In this multidisciplinary course, students will explore the theory and praxis of ritual perormance from an African diaspora lens.  Our investigation will rotate around the nexus of Theatrical Jazz, a theatre/dance form originated in the 1970s by pioneers like Laurie Carlos and Dianne McIntyre that brought together experiemental aesthetics, West African spirituality, and the political realities of black feminism.  With values which include:  presence, breath, improvisation, dissonance, and virtuosity, it is easy to see how Theatrical Jazz is not only a theatrical form, but a rigorous training methodology where identity and spirit merge.  Students will explore cosmologies of the Bantu-Kongo and Yoruba, along with their disaporic tendrils in the U.S. and the Caribbean, with a mind to how these (and other indigenous) systems can inform performance.  Students will also create original theatrical jazz pieces as an offering to the many communities of which they are a part.  

 

COMM 397GC – Gender and Interpersonal Communication
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Devon Greyson

 

What is gender and how does it affect the way we communicate with each other? This course provides an overview of the ways gendered identities, expressions, discourses, norms and roles affect our information interactions on an individual basis and in groups, online and off. Students will explore topics ranging from communication in family relationships to classroom and workplace communication dynamics to online self representation, applying an intersectional lens to the role of gendered power dynamics in shaping interpersonal communication.  Open to Senior and Junior Communication majors only.  All other majors by permission of the instructor, dgreyson@umass.edu.

 

COMM 497P – On Citizenships and Belonging
Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Kimberlee Perez

 

Citizenships and belongings are unstable, dynamic, ongoing sites of struggle that animate one another. This course looks at citizenships and belongings as communication practices that include and produce multiple and competing discourses, relations, and lived experiences. Using critical women of color, feminist, queer and performance theories, the course begins and centers questions on citizenships and belongings from and through their systemic exclusions, namely those whose subjectivities, bodies, identities and relations place them outside the bounds of the norm. This decolonial approach includes the makings and doings of intersectionality, reflexivity, resistance, counterpublics, and worldmakings through narratives, creativity, aesthetics, and embodiments of POC, queer, trans, working class, migrant, and others who forge alternate intimacies, citizenships and belongings. Course work will include, but will not be limited to, opportunities for non-normative knowledge production and research such as such as performance, creative and experimental writing, digital and visual practice.

 

ECON 348 – The Political Economy of Women
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Lisa Saunders

 

A critical review of neoclassical, Marxist, and feminist economic theories pertaining to inequality between men and women in both the family and the firm.  Open to students with ECON, RES-ECON, or STPEC as their primary major.  Prerequisite:  ECON 103 or RES-ECON 102. Open only to ECON/ STPEC/ RESEC primary majors until after juniors enroll, then open to all on November 10.

 

ENGLISH 132 – Gender, Sexuality, Literature, and Culture
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m. – Subhalakshmi Gooptu
Monday, Wednesday, Friday  11:15-12:05 p.m. – Sharanya Sridhar

Literature treating the relationship between man and woman. Topics may include: the nature of love, the image of the hero and heroine, and definitions, past and present, of the masculine and feminine.  (Gen.Ed. AL, DG)

 

ENGLISH 132 – Gender, Sexuality, Literature, and Culture
Monday, Wednesday, Friday  10:10-11:00 – David Pritchard

 

In this class, we will study a wide array of literary registrations of the dynamics of gender and sexuality. Our basic aim will be to parse the four keywords in the course title. We will examine how each of these terms raises questions about representation and figuration, and bring these questions to bear on how we understand different historical configurations of gender and sexuality across the 20th and 21st centuries.

 

ENGLISH 132 – Gender, Sexuality, Literature, and Culture
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m. – Thakshala Tissera

 

Children begin to be socialized into their gender roles at home. Nevertheless, the impact of gender and sexuality is neither limited to the private sphere, nor are these identity markers free from larger socio-political influences.  One’s biological sex, performance of gender and sexuality have wider implications in terms of the larger social roles that one is expected to enact and even the ways in which one is expected to inhabit the role of a citizen as seen by the long struggle for women’s franchise in the past and the ongoing struggles of transgender persons who wish to serve in the military. While one’s gender and sexuality are crucial aspects of one’s identity, they are also intersectional; affected by other socio-economic identity markers. This course will examine the engagement with gender and sexuality in a selection of literary and cinematic texts from different parts of the Anglophone world in the 20th and 21st centuries. We will commence by considering the gendered socializing process of children: a process which appears to be a particularly private affair but is in fact influenced and shaped by larger political moments and movements. The course will then consider the impact of one’s gender and sexuality on community membership and citizenship including identities which actively threaten the existing nation-state such as the militant and the terrorist.

 

ENGLISH 371 – African American Literature
Monday, Wednesday, Friday  12:20-1:10 p.m.
Emily Lordi

 

In this course we will study works of fiction, nonfiction, drama, poetry, and music created by African American artists between 1970 and the present. Authors might include Toni Morrison, Percival Everett, Suzan-Lori Parks, Lucille Clifton, Claudia Rankine, Danez Smith, Kiese Laymon, and Audre Lorde. You must have fulfilled your CW Gen. Ed. requirement to enroll in this course.

 

GERMAN 363 – Witches:  Myth and Reality
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 1:25-2:15 p.m.
Kerstin Mueller Dembling

 

This course focuses on various aspects of witches/witchcraft in order to examine the historical construction of the witch in the context of the social realities of women (and men) labeled as witches.  The main areas covered are:  European pagan religions and the spread of Christianity; the "Burning Times" in early modern Europe, with an emphasis on the German situation; 17th-century New England and the Salem witch trials; the images of witches in folk lore and fairy tales in the context of the historical persecutions; and contemporary Wiccan/witch practices in their historical context.  The goal of the course is to deconstruct the stereotypes that many of us have about witches/witchcraft, especially concerning sexuality, gender, age, physical appearance, occult powers, and Satanism.  Readings are drawn from documentary records of the witch persecutions and witch trials, literary representations, scholarly analyses of witch-related phenomena, and essays examining witches, witchcraft, and the witch persecutions from a contemporary feminist or neo-pagan perspective.  The lectures will be supplemented by related material taken from current events in addition to visual material (videos, slides) drawn from art history, early modern witch literature, popular culture, and documentary sources.  Conducted in English.  (Gen Ed. I, DG)

 

HISTORY 265H – U.S. LGBT and Queer History
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Julio Capo

 

This honors general education course explores how queer individuals and members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) communities have influenced the social, cultural, economic, and political landscape in United States history. Topics include sodomy, cross-dressing, industrialization, feminism, the construction of the homo/heterosexual binary, the "pansy" craze, the homophile, gay liberation, and gay rights movements, HIV/AIDS, immigration, and same-sex marriage. This four-credit course fulfills both "HS" (i.e., Historical Studies) and "U" (i.e.,Diversity: United States) general education requirements.  Open to Senior, Junior, and Sophomore Commonwealth Honors College students only.

 

HISTORY 364/POLISCI 364 – Gender and Race in U.S. Social Policy History
Wednesday  5:30-8:00 p.m.
Elizabeth Sharrow

 

What are the problems associated with developing equitable and just policy?  Why does social policy in the United States continue to be marked by tensions between the principle of equality and the reality of inequalities in social, political, and economic realms?  How might policy subvert or reinforce these differences and inequalities?  This class examines the history of social policy in the United States, particularly those policies affecting concerns of gender, race, and class.  We will examine a wide range of social policies, focusing on those affecting groups such as: women, racial and ethnic minorities, LGBT people, and low-income people.  We will study primarily empirical work, while asking questions about how political culture, interest groups, social movements, government institutions and other factor influence U.S. social policy.  Open to Seniors, Juniors & Sophomores only. Must not have completed Political Science 395S.

 

HISTORY 393SI – Indigenous Women of North America
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Alice Nash

 

See department for description.  Open to Seniors, Juniors & Sophomores only.

 

HISTORY 397AW – American Women in the 1950s
Monday, Wednesday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
Andrea Estepa

 

For many of us, the image that comes to mind when we think of women in the 1950s is a suburban housewife and mother like Donna Reed or June Cleaver. But how much did real women's lives have in common with their sitcom counterparts? This course will explore women's experiences of and contributions to social, cultural, and political life in the U.S. during the 1950s. Using a wide variety of sources (oral histories, memoirs, novels, magazine articles, advertisements, movies and TV programs, as well as works of history), we will study American women's actual experiences of sexuality, marriage, family life, the workplace, and politics, as well as the messages they received about what constituted "appropriate" behavior in both public and private life. We'll pay special attention to women's participation in the major social changes and cultural trends of the time, including the growth of suburbia and the rise of consumer culture, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, the Beat Generation, youth culture, and rock and roll. We'll also look at the diversity of women's experiences, analyzing how differences of race, ethnicity, class, region, and age helped shape the opportunities and choices available to individual women.

 

HISTORY 397RR – History of Reproductive Rights Law
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Jennifer Nye

 

This course will explore the history of reproductive rights law in the United States, centering the reading of statutes, court decisions, amicus briefs, and law review articles.  We will look at the progression of cases and legal reasoning involving a wide variety of reproductive rights issues, including forced sterilization, contraception, abortion, forced pregnancy/c-sections,  policing pregnancy (through welfare law, employment policies and criminal law), and reproductive technologies.  We will pay particular attention to how differently situated women were/are treated differently by the law, particularly on the basis of age, class, race, sexual orientation, and ability.  We will also examine the role lawyers have historically played in advancing (or constraining) the goals of the reproductive rights movement(s) and explore the effectiveness of litigation as a strategy to secure these rights.  Finally, we will consider the question of reproductive rights versus reproductive justice and whether reproductive justice can be obtained through advocating for reproductive rights

 

HISTORY 397SC – Sex and the Supreme Court
Tuesday  2:30-5:00 p.m.
Jennifer Nye

 

This course focuses on the U.S. Supreme Court and its rulings regarding sex and sexuality.  What has the Court said about what type of sexual activity or sexual relationships are constitutionally protected and how and why has this changed over time?  What is or should be the Court’s role in weighing in on these most intimate issues?  We will examine several hot button issues such as reproduction (sterilization/contraception/abortion); marriage (polygamous/interracial/same sex); pornography/obscenity; sodomy; sexual assault on college campuses; and sex education in public schools.  We will consider how the Court and advocates framed these issues, used or misused historical evidence, and how the argument and/or evidence changed depending on the audience (i.e. the Court or the general public).  Students will write several short argumentative essays, learn how to read and brief Supreme Court cases, and present an oral argument based on one of their argumentative essays.  Prior law-related coursework is helpful, but not required.

 

HISTORY 450 – Junior Year Writing Seminar in History – De-Marginalizaing Race and Gender:  African American Women’s History
Tuseday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
LaShonda Barnett

 

In this seminar we place African American women’s lives in the interpretive center of our inquiry into U.S. history. Our study is framed by the social and political movements to which African American women’s participation laid claim, and the ways in which this participation enabled (and enables) them to assert power in American public life. Tracing black women’s experiences as slaves, abolitionists, club women, freedom fighters, laborers, professionals, and artists, we will analyze the intersection of race and gender in American history. Drawing on an array of primary sources including letters, speeches, photographs, as well as black women’s print culture, music, and secondary sources, we will pay particular attention to: (1) the social construction of African American womanhood; (2) the meaning of freedom for black women living in the shadow of slavery, and the strategies they employed to gain civil rights; (3) black women’s changing economic status during the interwar period; (4) black women’s roles in the ascendancy of black nationalism; (5) the relationship between corporeal representations of black women in the media, including the historicization of black women’s beauty practices and the black female body as a site of political struggle. Designed to provide experience in the production of a scholarly paper based on primary sources, this course exposes students to the tools and techniques of historical research.  Open to Seniors and Juniors in History, Middle East and Judaic majors only.

 

JUDAIC 383/WGSS 391D – Women, Gender, Judaism
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Susan Shapiro

 

Historically, the figure of the “Jew” has been thought of as male.  Making male experience normative has in turn shaped how Judaism itself has been understood.  Shifting the basic terms and focus to include attention to women, gender, and sexuality significantly re-shapes our understanding of both Judaism and of Jewish culture/history.   This course not only “fills in the blanks” of the missing women of Jewish history and tradition, but attends to questions of contemporary forms of Jewish women's and men’s gendered lives, identities and sexualities.   Beginning with the Bible, the course proceeds historically, concluding with contemporary views of and debates surrounding matters of gender and sexuality.

 

LABOR 201 – Issues of Women and Work
Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Clare Hammonds

 

The role of women at a variety of workplaces from historical, economic, sociological, and political points of view. Among areas considered: discrimination, health care, women in the labor movement and in management, and civil rights legislation.  (Gen. Ed. SB, DU)

 

LEGAL 391SV – Sexual Violence, Justice, and the Law
Monday, Wednesday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
Meredith Loken

 

This course explores the ambitious and complicated relationship between sexual violence and the legal system. We will investigate the concept of `justice,’ examine the law as a justice-seeking mechanism, and identify the benefits and drawbacks of legal approaches. Topics include the feminist push for legal and criminal retribution in sexual violence cases; unequal race, class, gender, and status distribution of legal access; institutionalized abuse in militaries and prisons; responses to conflict-related sexual violence; and extra-legal modes of justice-seeking including restorative justice and vigilantism.

 

PHIL 197S - Sexual Ethics
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Andrea Wilson

 

What does it take for someone to consent to sex?  Is consent all you need for sex to be morally permissible?  What is it about sexual harassment that makes it so bad?  Is prostitution morally permissible?  Is pornography morally permissible?  Is there anything wrong with having sexual fantasies about people I know?  What about strangers?  What, if anything is wrong with sexual objectification?  

 

POLISCI 291U – UMass Women Into Leadership
Tuesday  5:30-8:00 p.m.
Michelle Goncalves

 

UMass Women into Leadership (UWiL) is a series of hands-on workshops designed to educate participants on the existence and causes of gender disparities in public service, to provide leadership training to prepare participants to enter public service careers, and to offer mentoring and networking programs to help launch public service careers.  Open to students who have been accepted into the UWiL program.  Instructor's email: uwil@umass.edu

 

POLISCI 297W – Introduction to Women and Politics in the USA
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Maryann Barakso

 

This course examines women's political incorporation in the United States primarily, but not exclusively, with respect to electoral politics. We explore women's pre-suffrage political activities before delving into the campaign for women's suffrage. We study the effects of achieving suffrage on women's political behavior during the period immediately following their achievement of the right to vote and beyond. The relationship between women and party politics will be probed before discussing the challenges women still face as candidates in state and federal legislatures in the U.S. The extent to which women's participation in campaigns and elections makes a substantive difference in policy making is considered. Subsequent discussions examine the role women's organizations currently play in expanding women's political representation in the U.S.  Open to Senior and Junior Political Science majors only. An Intro Political Science class is recommended but not required. Open to Non-major Seniors/Juniors after initial pre-registration period.

 

POLISCI 364/HISTORY 364 – Gender and Race in U.S. Social Policy
Wednesday  5:30-8:00 p.m.
Elizabeth Sharrow

 

What are the problems associated with developing equitable and just policy?  Why does social policy in the United States continue to be marked by tensions between the principle of equality and the reality of inequalities in social, political, and economic realms?  How might policy subvert or reinforce these differences and inequalities?  This class examines the history of social policy in the United States, particularly those policies affecting concerns of gender, race, and class.  We will examine a wide range of social policies, focusing on those affecting groups such as: women, racial and ethnic minorities, LGBT people, and low-income people.  We will study primarily empirical work, while asking questions about how political culture, interest groups, social movements, government institutions and other factor influence U.S. social policy.

 

POLISCI 394FI – Family and the State
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Diane Curtis

 

Why and how is the state involved in the definition of families, access to marriage, and intervention on behalf of children? This course will address these and other questions as we explore the ways in which the legal boundaries and connections between government and family have evolved over the last century in the United States. Issues of gender, race, class and sexual orientation will naturally play a significant role in these explorations. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-PolSci majors.

 

PUBHLTH 372 – Maternal and Child Health in the Developing World
Monday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Bridget Thompson

 

This course is designed to give students a broad overview to pertinent topics in the field of global maternal and child health. Topics covered include causes of maternal and infant mortality, treatment of malaria in pregnancy, HIV and pregnancy, infant nutrition, maternal and child nutrition, gender roles, and cultural and religious concepts in relation to working in a global setting. This course will explore approaches to public health programming that acknowledge and incorporate cultural differences.

 

PSYCH 391ZZ – Psychology of the Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Experience
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
John Bickford

 

Students in this course will explore psychological theory and research pertaining to gay, lesbian, and bisexual people. Topics include sexual orientation, sexual identity development, stigma management, heterosexism & homonegativity, gender roles, same-sex relationships, LGB families, LGB diversity, and LGB mental health. Open to Senior and Junior Psychology majors only.  Prerequisite: PSYCH 241

 

PORTUG 309 – Brazilian Women
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Tal Goldfajn

 

Contact department for description.  (Gen.Ed. SB, DG)

 

PUBHLTH 328 – Fundamentals of Women’s Health
Thursday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Sara Sabelawski

 

This course will provide a comprehensive overview of issues related to health in women, addressing areas including but not limited to biology, psychology, geography, economics, health policy, and social issues.  Open to Sophomore, Junior, and Senior Public Health majors only.

 

PUBHLTH 490J – Reproductive Justice
Monday 4:00-6:30 p.m.
Aline Gubrium

 

Reproductive Justice course is designed to explore social scientific, feminist, and critical approaches to reproductive health issues. It looks at reproduction in the broader structural (socioeconomic and political) contexts in which it is situated. In particular, in the course we explore the gendered, racialized, cultural, sexual, and classed dimensions that underlie women?s reproduction, with special attention to the long-term health effects of racism, poverty, and sexism.  Prerequisite: PUBHLTH 200.

 

SOCIOL 106 – Race, Gender, Class & Ethnicity
Monday, Wednesday 2:30-3:45 p.m.
C.N. Le

 

Introduction to Sociology.  Analysis of the consequences of membership in racial, gender, class and ethnic groups on social, economic and political life.    (Gen.Ed. SB, DU)

 

SOCIOL 222 – The Family
Monday, Wednesday, Friday  9:05-9:55 a.m.
Mahala Stewart

 

First part: historical transformations in family life (relationships between husbands and wives, position and treatment of children, importance of kinship ties); second part: the contemporary family through life course (choice of a mate, relations in marriage, parenthood, breakup of the family unit). (Gen.Ed. SB, DU)

 

SOCIOL 287 – Sexuality and Society
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Janice Irvine

 

The many ways in which social factors shape sexuality. Focus on cultural diversity, including such factors as race/ethnicity, gender, and sexual identity in organizing sexuality in both individuals and social groups.  Prerequisite:  100-level Sociology course.  (Gen.Ed. SB, DU)

 

SOCIOL 385 – Gender and the Family
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Ana Villalobos

 

This course explores the family as a gendered social construction. It considers how the family reflects and reproduces gender roles that are woven into the social norms of our society.

 

AFROAM 197B – Taste of Honey:  Black Film Since the 1950s, Part 2
Thursday  6:00-8:30 p.m.
John Bracey

 

See department for description.

 

AFROAM 345 – Southern Literature

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.

Brit Rusert

 

Southern literature by African Americans, including slave narratives, autobiography, fiction and poetry. Concepts and issues of time, oppression and violence, culture and tradition, family and community, roots of social change as they impact factors of identity, race, class, and gender.

 

ANTHRO 297LW – Life and Work in Contemporary China

Tuesday, Thursday  4:00-5:15 p.m.

Ge Jian

 

China's prominence is growing on the international stage from joining the World Trade Organization to hosting the Olympic Games in 2008. Yet a myriad of representations of China as an impoverished developing country, a socialist state with an authoritarian government, and the next superpower circulates in the global imaginary. Set against this backdrop of discordant imaginaries, this course will examine the political, economic, social and cultural transformations from the start of China's economic reform (late 1970s) to today. China's contemporary global status will be understood through the everyday "life and work" of Chinese citizens by exploring the issues of urbanization, migration and labor, family life, gender and sexuality, the real estate market that affects every Chinese's life, and the marginalized social groups. Class materials will be drawn from academic writings in several disciplines such as anthropology, cultural studies, economics, geography, history and political science, as well as journalistic articles, films, documentaries, images, and personal narratives. The objective of this course is to gain an understanding of the complex history and social changes in contemporary China beyond the simplified stereotypical representations. Therefore, this is a course that neither glorifies or demonizes China, rather it examines in a rigorously academic setting how the last thirty years of social changes since the "reform and opening" (gaige kaifang) have had a profound impact on the lives of ordinary Chinese people and its implications for the world.

 

CHINESE 241 – Contemporary Chinese Literature

Tuesday, Thursday  4:00-5:15 p.m.

Ying Wang

 

The development of modern China as seen through its literature covering the period 1915-1989. Exploration of the relationship between writing and political change, the role of dissident writers, and the politics of gender in texts from mainland China and Taiwan. All readings are in English translation.

 

COMM 271 – Humor in Society

Monday, Wednesday  1:25-2:15 p.m.

Friday discussions

Stephen Olbrys Gencarella

 

This course examines humor as a significant form of creative expression in social and political life. In recent decades, scholars of all persuasions from the humanities, social sciences, and even hard sciences have examined this subject through a critical lens, leading to the development of an interdisciplinary field known as humor studies. This course provides an introduction to that burgeoning field. Topics will include different theories of humor, the relationship between humor and play, the differences between humor and comedy, the use of humor in the redress of political and social tensions, the importance of the body in humor, and the role of humor in maintaining identity, especially in the negotiation of race, gender, class, ethnicity, religion, and sexual orientation. (Gen Ed SB, DU)  Formerly numbered COMM 197C. If you have taken COMM 297C, you cannot take this course. 

 

COMM 397EC – Empowering Communities

Wednesday 9:00-12:00 p.m.

Mari Castaneda

 

Contact department for description.

 

COMM 491C – Media and Children’s Culture

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.

Lynn Phillips

In this seminar, we will consider how children make meaning of and navigate through their complex relationships with media and consumer culture, as well as the implications of those relationships for children’s individual and collective well-being. We will draw on social and cultural theory and research to examine a wide range of topics, including: the nature and politics of children’s programming; gendered toys and games; the sexualization and commodification of children in advertising; psychological, social, and familial impacts of marketing strategies aimed at children; media portrayals of childhood disorders; depictions of race, class, gender, and sexuality in ads, programming, fairy tales, and classroom materials; cultural, environmental, and health consequences of childhood consumerism; the roles of various media in the construction of adolescent identity; the possibilities of early media literacy; and the lived realities of children around the world whose labor creates the products promoted to children in Western cultures. Throughout the course, we will ask ourselves: What is child culture? How have our cultural constructions of childhood shaped our sense of who children are, what they need, and what type of developmental environments we, as a society, should provide for them?  Open to Senior and Junior Communication majors only.  Comm 121 is strongly recommended.
 

COMM 495A – Performance Ethnography
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Claudio Moreira

What is Ethnography? What is Performance (auto) Ethnography? How can we think about Performing Ethnography? Drawing heavily on the works of Dwight Conquergood, Norman Denzin, and D. Soyini Madison, we give a rest to traditional forms of qualitative inquiry as we disrupt the notion of "business as usual" in the academic space. We will examine the interpenetrating relationships among performance, ethnography, and culture. The readings and assignments forefront localized critical pedagogy, critical personal narratives, decolonizing and interpretive inquiry as moral, political discourse. From the everyday space where gender, race, class, and performances intersect, we will examine how the practices of critical inquiry can be used to imagine, write and perform a free democratic society.  Open to Senior and Junior Communication majors only.  Pre-Requisite: COMM 125

 

COMP-LIT 231 – Comedy

Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 – Elena Igartuburu Garcia

Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m. – Juan Carlos Cabrera Pons

 

Our course begins with the premise that contemporary American comedy is informed by the histories of ethnic American groups -- African Americans, Native Americans, Asian Americans and U.S. Latinos/Latinas -- along with issues of race, class, sexuality and citizenship. American comedians, independent filmmakers, feminists and transgendered comics deploy the language of comedy to invoke serious social matters in contemporary American life: racism, heterosexism, homophobia, class biases against the poor and the undocumented, misogyny, war and other burning issues of the day. We will thus consider that the ends of comedy are more than laughter. Comedy confronts political issues that are constitutive of and threatening to the U.S. body politic. (Gen Ed AL)

 

COMP-LIT 320H – Irish Writers and Culture Context

Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.

Patricia Gorman

 

In this class, we read and discuss classic Irish short stories, contemporary drama, and the experimental modern and contemporary novel.  We screen award-winning films and listen to and discuss poetry. Topics represented in these works include: theology, myth, nationalism, sexual politics, music and art.  Students may choose their area of concentration.  Course content originates in Irish culture and provides the opportunity comparative, global inquiry. 
Gen Ed (AL)

 

COMP-LIT 339 – International Crime, Mystery and Detective Fiction

Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.

Jacquelyn Southern

 

Through suspenseful narratives, crime fiction develops the meanings and envisions the social locations of crime and punishment, good and evil, and order and disorder. In this course, we will explore this genre’s thematics, protagonists, and rhetorics of place as ways of problematizing social identity (class, gender, race, ethnicity, indigeneity, sexuality), morality, and the limits of transgression. We will compare the narratives, tropes, and characteristic figures of related genres such as the early social survey and muckraking journalism (such as Henry Mayhew and Jacob Riis). We will also ask how the genre has traveled and been reimagined and reinterpreted in popular culture as radio, film, television, plays, visual culture, and licensed products. We will read selected classic and contemporary crime fiction authors from around the world, including novels, novellas, and short stories. (Gen. Ed. AL, DG)

 

COMP-LIT 391SF/COMP-LIT 591SF/FILM-ST 391SF – International Science Fiction Cinema

Tuesday  7:00-10:00 p.m.

Discussions Thursday and Friday

C.N. Nicholas Crouch

 

This course provides an introduction to science fiction cinema from the end of the nineteenth century to today. Beginning with the experiments of the Melies Brothers and the importance of German Expressionist films like Fritz Lang's Metropolis, the course considers technological prognostication from Destination Moon to 2001: A Space Odyssey, adventure and science fiction in films like Forbidden Planet and Star Wars, and the dystopian imagination from Invasion of the Body Snatchers to District 9. The course will also highlight the roles of women writers and directors from Thea von Harbou to Kathryn Bigelow, and technological cinematic advances from matte painting and process shots to CGI.

 

EDUC 377 – Introduction to Multicultural Education

Monday 12:20-2:50 p.m.

Marialuisa Di Stefano

 

Introduction to the sociohistorical, philosophical, and pedagogical foundations of cultural pluralism and multicultural education.  Topics include experiences of racial minorities, white ethnic groups and women; intergroup relations in American society, sociocultural influences and biases in schools; and philosophies of cultural pluralism.

 

ECON 397MI – City, Industry, Labor and Colonial India

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 p.m.

Priyanka Srivastava

 

Focusing on Calcutta (present day Kolkata) and Bombay (present day Mumbai), the two most important port cities and industrial centers of British India, this course examines how trade and industrialization shaped urban society and politics in colonial India. We will explore themes that include the following: colonial trade, the gendered history of colonial labor migration, beginning of factory industries, the emergence of a class of industrial entrepreneurs and wage earners, the built environment of colonial cities, industrial housing, the development of labor unions and their interactions with the anti-imperialist nationalist politics.  Open only to ECON/ STPEC/ RESEC majors until after juniors enroll, then open to all November 10.

 

EDUC 210 – Social Diversity in Education

Tuesday  11:00-12:45 p.m.

Discussions - Thursday

Kevin Goodman

 

Focus on issues of social identity, social and cultural diversity, and societal manifestations of oppression.  Draws on interdisciplinary perspectives of social identity development, social learning theory, and sociological analyses of power and privilege within broad social contexts.  (Gen.Ed. I, DU)

 

ENGLISH 279 – Introduction to American Studies

Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.

Asha Nadkarni

What is America? Is it a place, is it a concept, or is it something else entirely? This course will investigate and complicate that question through an interdisciplinary exploration of American culture from the late 19th century to the present. We will use the second edition of Keywords for American Studies to ground our examination of America and of American Studies, focusing on different articulations of American culture over time. Course materials may include literature, films, visual art, and other media forms, with an eye to how each text gives representational shape to the experiences they depict. We will concentrate especially on how they negotiate issues of race, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexuality. This course is required for the Letter of Specialization in American Studies.  (Gen. Ed. AL, DU)

 

 

ENGLISH 376 – African Fiction

Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.

Sarah Patterson

 

In this class, we will explore the short stories and novels that engage popular U.S. literary tropes of heroism, femininity and working-class identities. From Mark Twain’s Pudd’nhead Wilson to Pauline Hopkins’ Contending Forces, the reading selection will introduce key authors and cultural moments that shaped mystery, romance and sentimental nineteenth-century fiction. The class will focus on the aesthetic representation of core figures of society as well as the intellectual discourse that promoted contemporaneous readers’ social consciousness.

 

ENGLISH 392R – Anti-Capitalism & Revolution in 20th and 21st Century U.S. Poetry

Tuesday, Thursday 2:30-3:45 p.m.

Ruth Jennison

 

How do poets engage in their work with the riot, the swarm, the strike, the boycott, the occupation, the commune, the sit-in, the picket, and the mass demonstration? We will explore (mostly American) poetry written during the three most recent periods of capitalist economic crisis and corresponding social unrest: the 1930s the 1970s, and post-2008.  Our guiding questions will be: How does poetry offer ways for its readers to grasp the contours of capitalism as a system contoured by asymmetrical class struggle, racism and sexism?  What strategies of resistance do American poets embrace and elaborate in their popular and experimental forms? What is the relationship between politics that take place in the streets and politics that take place on the page? What rich tensions arise between the poet as militant and the poet as artist?  Our texts from the 1930s will include poetry by Sol Funaroff, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, and Muriel Rukeyser. From the 1970s, we'll examine the work of Amiri Baraka, John Wieners, Hannah Weiner, Gwendolyn Brooks, Larry Eigner, Jimmy Santiago Baca, and Diane Di Prima. In our study of current poetry we will explore how American poets metabolize the rise of neoliberalism, and popular resistance to the politics of austerity. Contemporary poets will include Keston Sutherland, M. NourbeSe Philip, Rob Halpern, Chris Nealon, Craig Santos Perez, Uyen Hua, Anne Boyer, Fred Moten and Julianna Spahr. We will place these poetic texts in conversation with theories, experiences, and manifestos of resistance and liberation, including works by both individuals and collectives: Marx, Lenin, Mao, Malcolm X, Angela Davis, Sylvia Federici, The Black Panther Party, Chicago Gay Liberation, and The Paris Commune, among others.

 

FRENCHST 353 – African Film

Tuesday 4:00-6:45 p.m.

Discussions, Thursday

Patrick Mensah

 

Course taught in English.  Histories and development of African Francophone and Caribbean film, from its inception to the present day. The sociocultural, economic, and political forces and imperatives defining its forms and directions. Questions this work raises in film aesthetics and theory as a whole. Screenings and analysis of films by Sembene, Achkar, Kabore, Mweze, Cisse, Drabo, Bekolo, Teno, Peck, Palcy, Lara, Haas, and others.  (Gen.Ed. AT, DG)

 

HISTORY 154 – Social Change in the 1960s

Monday, Wednesday, Friday  11:15-12:05 p.m.

Monday, Wednesday, Friday  1:25-2:15 p.m.

Andrea Estepa

 

Few periods in United States. history experienced as much change and turmoil as the "Long Sixties" (1954-1975), when powerful social movements overhauled American gender norms, restructured the Democratic and Republican parties, and abolished the South's racist "Jim Crow" regime. This course examines the movements that defined this era. We will explore the civil rights and Black Power movements; the student New Left and the antiwar movement; the women's and gay liberation movements; struggles for Asian American, Chicano/a, Native American, and Puerto Rican freedom; as well as the rise of conservatism. Throughout the semester, we will assess Sixties social movements' ideals, strategies, and achievements, and their ongoing influence upon U.S. politics, society, and culture. The course will feature classroom discussion on assigned readings, lectures, films, and a group research project based on interpretation of documents housed in Du Bois Library Special Collections.  Instructor consent required.  (Gen.Ed. HS, DU) 

 

HISTORY 242H – American Family in Historical Perspective

Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.

Martha Yoder

 

An historical, cross-cultural, and interdisciplinary approach to the study of families in America.  We will examine the histories of various groups, exploring how these experiences have resulted in different family dynamics.  We will then take up the question of the continuing relevance of race, ethnicity, and social class to families in America today and to the discussion of family in American politics. (Gen.Ed. HS, DU)

 

 

HISTORY 264 – History of Health Care and Medicine in the U.S.

Monday, Wednesday 2:30-3:45 p.m.

Emily Redman

 

This course explores the history and social meaning of medicine, medical practice, health care, and disease in the United States from 1600 to the present. Using a variety of sources aimed at diverse audiences students will investigate topics such as: the evolution of beliefs about the body; medical and social responses to infectious and chronic disease; the rise of medical science and medical organizations; the development of medical technologies; mental health diagnosis and treatment; changing conceptions of the body; the training, role, and image of medical practitioners and the role of public and government institutions in promoting health practices and disease treatments. We will pay particular attention to the human experience of medicine, with readings on the experience of being ill, the delivery of compassionate care, and the nature of the relationship between practitioners and patients. Course themes will include race, gender, cultural diversity, women and gender, social movements, science, technology, politics, industry, and ethics. (Gen. Ed. HS, DU)

 

HISTORY 322 – Modern France

Tuesday, Thursday  4:00-5:15 p.m.

Jennifer Heuer

 

Modern French history is a dizzying sequence of revolutions, wars, and empires. The history of ‘Greater France’ is equally tumultuous, from revolt against slavery in Haiti during the French Revolution, the conquest of a vast new empire during the nineteenth century, and the bloody battles of decolonization after World War Two.  In connecting these stories, we will focus on who has been defined as a ‘citizen’  and what citizenship has meant for men and women.  We will look at changing class and gender relations, ideological struggles, and tensions between regional and national loyalties. We will also explore contested concepts of racial and ethnic identity, especially for colonial subjects, religious minorities, and immigrants.

 

HISTORY 397JL – Social Justice Lawyering

Thursday  2:30-5:00 p.m.

Jennifer Nye

 

From fighting Jim Crow segregation to challenging the recent Muslim travel ban, judicial review has historically been used as a strategy to reign-in executive and legislative over-reach and protect Constitutional rights.  This course will examine how lawyers, social movements, and everyday people have used litigation to advocate for social justice in the United States.  Through reading in-depth studies of important civil and criminal cases, we will explore such questions as:  What is the history of social justice lawyering in the United States and how, why and when have social movements turned to litigation to advance their causes? What are the pros and cons of using litigation to achieve social justice, versus other tools like direct action, lobbying for political change, and community organizing?  How effective is litigation in achieving the goals originally envisioned by lawyers, activists, and litigants?  How have lawyers constrained or expanded the vision of social justice movements?  What dilemmas do lawyers who are ethically bound to zealously advocate for the interests of individual clients’ face when they are additionally interested in advancing "a cause"?  Cases explored may include issues such as civil rights, women's rights, free speech, LGBT/Queer rights, disability rights, environmental justice, criminal justice, poverty and people's lawyering, immigration rights, and the rise of conservative social movement lawyering.  Prior law-related coursework helpful, but not required.

 

 

HISTORY 397BE – Colonial Black New England

Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.

LaShonda Barnett

 

African Americans developed and maintained significant economic and cultural advancements in colonial America, a fact eclipsed by the experience of slavery. But many African Americans, especially New Englanders, were more than chattel. By the second half of the seventeenth century, a growing number of black New Englanders engaged in an intricate system of Atlantic commerce, selling fish, furs, and timber not only in England but throughout Catholic Europe; shipbuilding; and transporting tobacco, rice, wine, sugar, and other cargo, including slaves. Although blacks played a significant role in the western hemisphere's foray into global economics, this historical fact is often omitted. This seminar offers a corrective to a major problem in American colonial history by placing African American lives at the interpretive center of our inquiry into early New England history. Our study is framed by the social and political movements to which black New Englanders’ participation laid claim; and the ways in which this participation enabled them to assert power in colonial public life. Tracing their experiences as maritime tradesmen, mariners, merchants, yeoman, commercially-oriented farmers, religious leaders, artisans, domestic help, midwives, and bondspeople, we will analyze the intersection of race and gender in early American history. The age of exploration and the establishment of the British colonies in North America in the period between King Philip's War (1675-6) and the American Revolution (1775-83) provide the historical back drop to our intensive treatment of Colonial Black New England. Drawing on an array of primary sources including letters, speeches, photographs, as well as early black print culture, music, and secondary sources, this course is designed to provide experience in the production of a scholarly paper cultivated from archival research that includes primary and secondary sources, this course exposes students to the historian's tools and techniques.

 

 

HISTORY 492N – Indigenous Peoples of the Americas to 1900:  An Inter-American Approach

Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.

Alice Nash

 

For all their diversity in terms of languages, cultures, and histories, the Indigenous peoples of the Americas share a common context of dealing with imposed settler-colonialism. This advanced seminar will use an inter-American approach to examine broad themes such as the Doctrine of Discovery, unfree labor, the impact of colonization on family and gender roles, education, and responses to the establishment of nation-states by former Spanish, French and British colonial powers. This course is especially suitable for students with an interest in U.S. history, Latin American Studies, Native American & Indigenous Studies, Atlantic or Pacific Worlds. Coursework includes heavy reading, a series of short response papers, and a research project.

 

HONORS 321H – Violence in American Culture

Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.

Ventura Perez

 

This course will explore the complex social and cultural interactions that can lead to violence. We will begin by examining various theories of human violence from a number of disciplines: anthropology, psychology, and sociology. Students will then survey different cultural attitudes towards violence beginning with several prehistoric sites from the American Southwest and northern Mexico. Next, the course will consider the historical roots of American violence starting with the European invasion of North America. Specific instances of violence in American history will also be considered, including the attempted genocide of American Indians, the enslavement of African Americans, and the American Civil War. The second half of the course will focus on a number of contemporary issues of American violence including race violence, hate crimes, violence against women, family violence, gang violence, and the violence in contemporary art and film. (Gen.Ed. SB, DU)

 

JOURNAL 425 – The Politics of Sport

Tuesday, Thursday  4:00-5:15 p.m.

Nicholas McBride

 

This course examines how the politics of gender, sexual identity and race play out in the arena of sports. Through readings, writing, documentary viewing and discussion, students will explore the ways in which sports either constructs or breaks down barriers among individuals and groups and how journalism is involved in the process.

 

JUDAIC 375 – Jewish Experience in the Americas

Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.

Aviva Ben-Ur

 

The development of Jewish identity and social institutions in the United States examined in socio-historical perspective. Topics include immigration patterns, labor movement, Yiddish culture, religious innovations, women's experiences, interaction with American culture.

 

LABOR 331/SOCIOL 331- Food and Labor

Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.

Jasmine Kerrissey

 

Around the United States, there is a growing movement aimed at creating a sustainable food system. More than 20 million people are employed in the food system - from farm workers to servers. These jobs represent a large proportion of low wage work. In this context, this course examines the relationship between labor conditions and ‘sustainable’ food. The course tackles three broad topics. First, using a historical lens, we will examine the social structures that have shaped how food is produced in the United States. Second, we will consider who works in the contemporary food system and what working conditions are like, attending to issues such as gender, race, and immigration status. Third, we will explore how workers have sought to improve conditions. We?ll discuss and evaluate various strategies to create change, such as strikes, unions, worker centers, student activism, alliances among food system workers, and fair trade certification.

 

POLISCI 361 – Civil Liberties

Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45

Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.

Sheldon Goldman

 

Development of constitutional law in the civil liberties sphere. First Amendment freedoms of speech, press, and religion, and certain rights of the accused; the rights of African-Americans and other minorites and the rights of women and gays under the equal protection of the laws clause. Prerequisite: basic American politics course or equivalent.  This class is open to Senior, Junior, and Sophomore Political Science and Legal Studies majors only.  Pre Requisite: POLISCI 101 or POLISCI 162 or LEGAL 250.  Course will open up to non-majors after initial registration ramping.

 

STPEC 189 – Introduction to Radical Social Theory

Wednesday  4:00-6:30 p.m.

Graciela Monteagudo

 

This is an introductory course to radical social theory. Our focus is the history of social thought in the West, and the postcolonial critiques of some of these ideas. In this course, students will learn that "radical" means "at the root," and radical social theory is theory that explains the roots of social inequalities and proposes ways of transforming society to achieve justice. As a General Education course, our goal is for students to have the opportunity to discuss key societal issues through a variety of disciplines, including philosophy, anthropology, history, economy, African-American, Native American and gender and sexuality studies. Through analysis of readings and films, we will explore the connection between cultural processes and power in the West and the implications for non-Western people on a global scale and on different times and places.

 

STPEC 391H – Core Seminar I

Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.

Shemon Salam

 

This course looks at the Black Radical Tradition and racial capitalism from the 15th century to World II. Through these two frameworks and methods we will analyze gender, inequality, nationalism, and struggles of the oppressed. This is a student driven course where classroom discussions, presentations, self-reflections, and group

work are central to the daily functioning of the class.

 

STPEC 392H – Core Seminar II

Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.

Graciela Monteagudo

 

This course focuses on a series of interrelated political, social and theoretical movements of the 20th and 21st Century with an emphasis on how political practices and philosophies relate to the successes and catastrophic failures of modernism in complex and contradictory ways. Some of the topics addressed include anti/post-colonialism, the role of identity in political theory/practice and poststructuralism. We will research the connection between race, class, gender, sexuality, able-bodiness and other axes of oppression resistance under neoliberalism, including violence against women. A major research paper of the student's choosing will be produced over the course of the semester allowing them to more deeply engage with a topic, and to practice applying the critical methodological and theoretical tools developed in the STPEC curriculum.

 

 

 

STPEC 494PI – Praxis

Wednesday  11:15-1:45 p.m.

Shemon Salam

 

This course tackles the latest developments in racial capitalism by analyzing social struggles and organizations since the economic crisis of 2007. Using the latest research on gender, class, race, empire, and sexuality this course looks at how crisis and struggle are simultaneously shaping the world. The final paper for this course is a 12-15 page paper that situates an organization within the framework of racial capitalism and analyzes how this organization addresses the dynamics of oppression and liberation.  As an integrative experience (IE) course students are encouraged to draw on knowledge from prior courses, life experiences, and readings from outside the class. Praxis will be driven by applying theory to the real world. This course is highly student driven: composed of presentations, small group discussions, debates, and self-reflection.

 

SOCIOL 224 – Social Class and Inequality

Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.

Cathryn Brubaker

 

The nature of social classes in society from the viewpoint of differences in economic power, political power, and social status. Why stratification exists, its internal dynamics, and its effects on individuals, subgroups, and the society as a whole. Problems of poverty and the uses of power.  (Gen.Ed. SB, DU)

 

SOCIOL 297S/LABOR 297S – Sports, Labor and Civil Rights

Tuesday, Thursday  8:30-9:45 a.m.

Jerrold Levinsky

 

Protests by professional and amateur athletes against racial and gender discrimination are not new or isolated events in U.S. history. In fact, sports have long been connected to the social, economic, and political issues of the day. With a particular focus on labor and civil rights struggle, our goal is to better understand the history of sports as it relates to social class, race, and gender. Students will analyze current controversies through this critical approach to sports and society.

 

SOCIOL 329 – Social Movements

Tuesday, Thursday  4:00-5:15 p.m.

Millicent Thayer

 

Explores how and why social movements occur, what strategies they use, how they create collective identities, how issues such as civil rights, workers' rights, women's rights, the environment, the global economy mobilize activists' participation within the circumstances faced. Fulfills junior year writing requirement for Sociol majors.  SOCIOL 396B (1 credit) will be added to the student's schedule before the end of the add/drop period.

 

SOCIOL 330 – Asian Americans and Inequalities

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 p.m.

Moon-Kie Jung

 

At least since the 1960s, sociology and the other social sciences have largely sidestepped questions of inequality in relation to Asian Americans, simplistically and indiscriminately positing them as a "model minority." This course examines various forms of social inequality between Asian Americans and other groups as well as among Asian Americans, including those based on race, gender, class, citizenship, and sexuality.

 

SOCIOL 329 – Social Movements

Tuesday, Thursday  4:00-5:15 p.m.

Millicent Thayer

 

Explores how and why social movements occur, what strategies they use, how they create collective identities, how issues such as civil rights, workers' rights, women's rights, the environment, the global economy mobilize activists' participation within the circumstances faced.  Prerequisite:  A 100-level or 200-level Sociology course.  Open to non-majors November 26th.  Fulfills junior year writing requirement for Sociol majors.  SOCIOL 396B (1 credit) will be added to the student's schedule before the end of the add/drop period.

 

SOCIOL 331/LABOR 331 – Food and Labor

Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.

Jasmine Kerrissey

 

Do you wonder where food comes from?  This course explores the labor that produces food, from the farm to the plate.  Three broad areas are examined: 1) how social structures shape work processes; 2) who works in the food industry and features of working conditions; 3) workers' movements to improve pay and conditions. With a focus on farm work, meatpacking, and restaurant work, we'll explore issues of gender, race, class, and immigration.

 

SPANISH 324 – Introduction to Latino/a Literature

Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.

Stephanie Fretta

 

In this course students will think critically about the various "wild tongues" that have defined U.S. Latinx literature and culture in the 20th and 21st centuries. Our analysis will center on issues of power as they are experienced by diverse U.S. Latinx populations. Specifically, we will focus on Latinx writers, performers, and scholars that push the boundaries of acceptable gender, sexuality, and racialization within U.S. Latinx cultures, focusing specifically on Caribbean and Chicanx populations in the United States. Students will be required to engage critically with primary texts, as well as reflect on the ways in which these issues exist in the world around us. Because Latinx thinkers often blur the boundaries of traditional literary and scholarly genres, we will consider pinnacle works of Latinx studies - such as those of Pedro Pietri, Gloria Anzaldua, and Junot Diaz - alongside other forms of cultural production, such as performance art and film. We will also try our hands at these art forms in an effort to find new, embodied ways to interact with expressions of Latinx culture. Course texts are written in both English and Spanish. Class discussion will take place in Spanish. All assignments must be completed in Spanish. (Gen. Ed. AL, DU)

 

SPANISH 397W/FILM-ST 397V – Latin American Cinema

Wednesday  4:00-6:30 p.m.

Barbara Zecchi

 

The course is designed to introduce students to the cinematic work of some of the most important Latin American directors from the seventies to the present. The course will center on a variety of topics that are vital to the understanding of the most significant political, historical, social and cultural events that have shaped Latin America. Some of the topics to be examined in the class are: racial, gender, sexual and identity issues; nation formation; revolution; immigration; repression; utopia; resistance; violence; freedom and slavery. Students will be expected to develop interpretative filmic skills through an exploration of the connections between the technical composition of the films and the social, political, and cultural context to which each film refers. Films for the course will be chosen from the following list: Camila, The Official Story, The Other Conquest, El hijo de la novia, Bye Bye Brazil, Central Station, Quilombo, City of God, Obstinate Memory, Azucar Amarga, Guantanamera, Memories of Underdevelopment, Strawberry and Chocolate, Nueba Yol, The Time of the Butterflies, El Norte, Amores Perros, Y tu mama tambien, Cabeza de Vaca, Like Water for Chocolate, Herod's Law, El callejon de los milagros, Danzon, The Oxcart, Ratas, ratones, rateros, The City of the Dogs, Our Lady of the Assassins, Machuca, and The Lion's Den. Requirements: two short analytical papers, mid-term exam and final paper. Course may be used for Certificate in Film Studies.

 

THEATER 331 – Black Theater

Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.

Priscilla Page

The African American presence in the American theater. Selected periods and styles.  Prerequisite: THEATER 120.  Students from all disciplines are welcome to enroll in this course.  Please contact instructor for enrollment information.

 

WGSS | Major/Minor Distribution Requirements | UMass Departmental | UMass Component
Graduate Level | Cont. Ed. | Amherst | Hampshire | Mt. Holyoke | Smith

 

WGSS 691B – Issues in Feminist Research
Wednesday  2:30-5:00 p.m.
Miliann Kang

 

This is a graduate seminar in feminist research, and constitutes a core course for students enrolled in the Graduate Certificate in Advanced Feminist Studies. Feminism has long been interested in a foundational way in questions of epistemology (how we know what we know) and research methodology (how we go about developing original research), because in its most recent incarnations, post-1968, it emerged as an academic formation that asked basic questions about disciplines: how did they invent a world without women? How was systemic bias built into its knowledge systems such that they made women, people of color, working class people, people outside the US and Europe (‘the West,’ as it came to be called, through an Orientalist bit of geographic folly), peasants, slaves, indigenous people, colonized people, (most) queers, trans folk and a great many others invisible? Obviously, in this endeavor feminists had help from many other fields and activist movements, which worked together across disciplines and movements to transform knowledge. In many ways, they won - no discipline or field of study is unchanged or untouched by these inquiries, although some are obviously more resistant than others. As this is a required course for graduate students enrolled in the Graduate Certificate in Feminist Studies, those students have priority for enrollment.  Please contact Linda Hillenbrand at lindah@umass.edu to add the course. 

 

WGSS 692T – Thinking with Feeling
Tuesday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Cameron Awkward-Rich

 

Traditionally, feeling has been regarded as private, internal, and subjective, a barrier to the production of knowledge. By contrast, in this seminar we will foreground feminist/queer/critical race approaches in order to ask: what does thinking with feeling allow us to know? Together, we will chart the multiple genealogies of affect theory; consider the role of feeling and affectivity in the production of race, gender, dis/ability, nation, and discipline; and attend to the structures of feeling that undergird existing scholarship. While the primary aim of this class is to track the emergence of feeling as both a method and an object of minoritized thought, we will also devote substantial attention to thinking with feeling as a means of generating our own critical and creative work.  Please contact Linda Hillenbrand at lindah@umass.edu to add this course.  This course counts as an elective for students in the Graduate Certificate in Advanced Feminist Studies program and will also fulfill a contemporary poetry literature requirement for ENGL MFA students.  Please specify if you are an English student or WGSS Certificate student when requesting to add the course. 

 

WGSS 797F/597F – South Asian Gender and Sexuality
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Svati Shah

 

This course will review major developments in feminist and sexuality-based social movements in South Asia since the turn of the twentieth century.  We will also explore the intersections of the politics of gender and sexuality in South Asia within the context of economic globalization policies that have been undertaken in the region since the early 1990s. The course readings will draw upon ethnographic studies, NGO reports, and theoretical critiques which examine economic globalization as an important structuring context for understanding changes in the ways in which the politics of gender and sexuality are constituted in the region. The course will explore these intersections by drawing from critiques of globalization, writings from South Asian feminist and LGBTQ movements, and contemporary social theory. While these critiques largely delineate global processes, the course will focus on the South Asian region to discern unique ways in which these processes find purchase with local histories and political formations. Specific case studies will include work on LGBT movements in the region, migration, feminism, communalism, legal reform, and the geopolitics of the region.

 

 

The requirements for the Graduate certificate are in the process of changing and will be updated on our website.  In the meantime, if you have questions about courses from other departments, please contact the Associate Director of the Graduate Program or the WGSS office.

 

AFROAM 630 – Critical Race Theories
Tuesday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Yemisi Jimoh

 

Participants in this seminar, Critical Race Theories, will examine the general foundational ideas and concepts shaping today's now proliferating scholarly enquiries that operate under the term critical race theories. While the basis for today's critical race theories developed from Critical Legal Studies and Critical Race Theory in legal scholarship, many scholars from a variety of disciplines have transformed for their own contexts the insights that have informed legal scholarship in this area.  An understanding of the entrenched racial structures in the United States and their basis in the social contract informing much of Western culture is especially useful for reading and analyzing a substantial portion of African American literature. Seminar participants will read early documents (The Declaration of Independence of the United States of America The Constitution of the United States of America, The Bill of Rights,  Emancipation Proclamation, the Reconstruction Amendments) together with texts by historical figures, philosophers, and others who have shaped or have responded to systems of race in the United States (Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Banneker, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Frederick Douglass, Immanuel Kant, David Hume, Jean-Jacques Rousseau and others) texts on theories of race (Smedley, Frederickson, Eze and others), and legal as well as literary, political, and philosophical critical race theorists (Bell, Crenshaw, Gotanda, Austin, Mills, Baldwin, Neal, Fuller, Du Bois, among others).

 

AFROAM 691D – Black Women in the Civil Rights Movement
Thursday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Traci Parker

 

Women initiated, organized, and sustained the Civil Rights Movement. Not only did women activists far outnumber men, but they also emerged as leaders in working-class and poor neighborhoods more often than men. This course will investigate women's diverse visions of and involvement in social justice using historical texts, film, television, and music. Taking the long civil rights movement approach, it will consider middle-class and working-class activism towards racial, gender, and economic justice in the early twentieth century, the labor-oriented civil rights movement of the 1930s and 1940s, and the modern Civil Rights and Women's Liberation Movements. Special attention will be paid to the relationships between black and white women and the impact of the movement on women?s status and identity. Notable activists like Mary Church Terrell, Ella Baker, Florynce Kennedy, Lena Horne, and Nina Simone, as well as those who remain unnamed in the historical record, will be critical to this investigation.

 

COMM 693D – Introduction to Film Theory
Tuesday 4:0-6:45 p.m.
Anne Ciecko

 

This course offers an introductory overview of major approaches to the study of film and audiovisual media, including formalism and realism ("classical" film theory), and theoretical and critical methods informed by structuralism, semiology, phenomenology, psychoanalysis, political theory, and cultural studies. Auteurism, feminist film theory, queer theory, genre studies, spectator/audience/ reception, star and performance studies, apparatus theory, postcolonial theory, and theories of new media will also be considered. Film clips and occasional longer works will be shown in class, but students will also be responsible for watching a number of films and/or other audiovisual materials outside class. Writing assignments will provide students with opportunities to further engage with and respond to course readings and related materials, and enable them to develop (and present to the class) exploratory work on projects tailored to individual interests and goals. Prior study of film is not required. This course is a requirement for the Graduate Certificate in Film Studies, but is open to all graduate students, any major or program.

 

ENGLISH 791SE – Sexuality, Capitalism, Colonialism
Thursday  1:00-3:30 p.m.
Jordy Rosenberg

 

This course will bring together a number of genres, fictions, theories and methodologies of waste, excess and surplus. We will read from areas as diverse as radical feminism, postcolonisl theory, Marxism, postmodern and contemporary fiction, and film.  Texts and authors may include. Amitav Ghosh, M. NourbeSe Philip,  Agnes Varda, Karl Marx, Fred Moten, Christina Sharpe, Georges Bataille, and Philip Roth.

 

HISTORY 692F/492F – Literature in the Field:  19th Century U.S. History

Wednesday  2:30-5:00

Sarah Cornell

 

This graduate seminar examines key historical events, issues, and people in the nineteenth-century United States.  Readings will cover a wide range of topics, including presidential politics and the two-party system; slavery and abolition; citizenship and suffrage; the Second Great Awakening and social reform movements; Indian Removal; westward expansion and the U.S.-Mexico War; the Civil War and Reconstruction; and immigration, industrialization, and labor.  Readings will introduce students to a variety of methodological approaches as well as key historiographic debates and trends in this field.  This seminar is designed to help prepare students for an exam field in 19th-century U.S. history as well as related fields such as U.S. women's history.

 

HISTORY 692P – U.S. Culture and Conflicts Asian Pacific

Tuesday 2:30-5:00 p.m.

Garrett Washington

 

In this graduate seminar students will examine the relationship between the United States and their Asian Pacific neighbors since 1800. The course will introduce students to key themes, theoretical frameworks, and chronologies relevant to the United States' diplomatic relations with Japan, China, Korea, Hawaii, the Philippines, and Vietnam. We will then explore the transnational cultural histories of the US with each of these countries. Through the lenses of gender, race, religion, and education students will explore the important role that individual actors, organizations, and ideas have played in connecting the US and the Asia Pacific. This approach aims to complicate students' understanding of what constitutes transnational history and familiarize them with less traditional categories of historical analysis.

 

HISTORY 693F – Empire and Nation
Wednesday  2:30-5:00 p.m.
Priyanka Srivastava

 

This graduate seminar explores the history and historiography of British Empire in India from the late eighteenth to the early twentieth centuries. We will examine how Britain derived power, profit, and glory from its colony in India. We will also examine the ways in which religion, caste, class, and gender constituted the ideas and practices of anti-imperialist nationalism(s) in India. Readings will cover a wide range of topics including indentured servitude; the opium trade; colonial knowledge and power systems, British rule and gender relations; the Mutiny of 1857, Gandhian and subaltern strategies of resistance, and the partition of India in 1947. This seminar is designed to help prepare students for an exam field in British Empire as well as related fields such as global or comparative history, and transnational women's history. Prior knowledge of Indian history is neither required nor assumed for this course.

 

 

Winter 2019

DEPARTMENTAL (100 level count towards the WGSS minor but not the major)

 

WGSS 205 – Feminist Health Politics
Kirsten Leng

What is health?  What makes health a matter of feminism?  And what might a feminist health politics look like?  These questions lay at the heart of this course.  In Feminist Health Politics, we will examine how health becomes defined, and will question whether health and disease are objectively measured conditions or subjective states.  We will also consider why and how definitions and standards of health have changed over time; why and how standards and adjudications of health vary according to gender, race, sexuality, class, and nationality; and how definitions of health affect the way we value certain bodies and ways of living.   Additionally, we will explore how knowledge about health is created; how environmental conditions, social location, politics, and economic conditions affect health; how various groups have fought for changes to health care practices and delivery; and how experiences of health and illness have been reported and represented.  Fulfills the Sexuality Studies distribution requirement for WGSS majors and minors.

 

COMM 288 – Gender, Sex and Representation
Sut Jhally

 

This course will examine the relationship between commercialized systems of representation and the way that gender and sexuality are thought of and organized in the culture. In particular, we will look at how commercial imagery impacts upon gender identity and the process of gender socialization. Central to this discussion will be the related issues of sexuality and sexual representation (and the key role played by advertising).

 

ENGLISH 132 – Gender, Sexuality, Literature and Culture
Sharanya Sridhar

 

Literature treating the relationship between man and woman. Topics may include: the nature of love, the image of the hero and heroine, and definitions, past and present, of the masculine and feminine.  (Gen.Ed. AL, DG)

 

PSYCH 391MC – Multicultural Psychology:  Intersections of Race, Class, and Gender
Alexandrea Craft

 

This course explores intersections of race, class and gender within families, and attends to the ways in which families are differently impacted by identity, privilege and social marginalization. This course will also explore how different racial, social class or gender identities may impact therapy or clinical practice.

 

SOCIOL 222 – The Family
Brandi Perri

 

First part: historical transformations in family life (relationships between husbands and wives, position and treatment of children, importance of kinship ties); second part: the contemporary family through life course (choice of a mate, relations in marriage, parenthood, breakup of the family unit). (Gen.Ed. SB, DU)

 

 

COMPONENT (WGSS majors & minors must concentrate their work on gender or sexuality.  100 level courses towards the minor but not the major.)

 

EDUC 210 – Social Diversity in Education
Warren Blumenfeld

 

Focus on issues of social identity, social and cultural diversity, and societal manifestations of oppression.  Draws on interdisciplinary perspectives of social identity development, social learning theory, and sociological analyses of power and privilege within broad social contexts.  (Gen.Ed. I, DU)

 

HISTORY 154 – Social Change in the 1960s
Julia Sandy-Bailey

 

This course focuses on the "Long Sixties,"  period stretching from the mid-1950s to the mid-1970s. We will look in new ways at topics you are probably already familiar with: the civil rights movement, the anti-Vietnam War movement, counterculture, sexual experimentation, and never trusting anyone over 30. We will also explore aspects of the Sixties you may not know about or associate with a different era, such as the Great Society, a thriving conservative movement, environmentalism, and gay rights. Students will view online lectures, participate in online discussions, and complete assignments which include reviewing music, movies, and books from the sixties. For more information or to request a syllabus, contact Professor Sandy: jsandybailey@admin.umass.edu. (4 credits, HSU)

 

SPRING 2019 CPE

 

DEPARTMENTAL (100 level count towards the WGSS minor but not the major)

 

ENGLISH 132 – Gender, Sexuality, Literature and Culture
Annaliese Hoehling

Literature treating the relationship between man and woman. Topics may include: the nature of love, the image of the hero and heroine, and definitions, past and present, of the masculine and feminine.  (Gen.Ed. AL, DG)

 

 

COMPONENT (WGSS majors & minors must concentrate their work on gender or sexuality.  100 level courses towards the minor but not the major.)

 

HISTORY 264 – History of Health Care and Medicine in the U.S.

TBD

 

This course explores the history and social meaning of medicine, medical practice, health care, and disease in the United States from 1600 to the present. Using a variety of sources aimed at diverse audiences students will investigate topics such as: the evolution of beliefs about the body; medical and social responses to infectious and chronic disease; the rise of medical science and medical organizations; the development of medical technologies; mental health diagnosis and treatment; changing conceptions of the body; the training, role, and image of medical practitioners and the role of public and government institutions in promoting health practices and disease treatments. We will pay particular attention to the human experience of medicine, with readings on the experience of being ill, the delivery of compassionate care, and the nature of the relationship between practitioners and patients. Course themes will include race, gender, cultural diversity, women and gender, social movements, science, technology, politics, industry, and ethics. (Gen. Ed. HS, DU)

 

AMST 265/SOCI 265 – Unequal Childhoods:  Race, Class and Gender in the United States
Tuesday, Thursday  111:30-12:50 p.m.
Leah Schmalzbauer

 

This class explores the ways in which race, class, gender and immigration status shape children’s lives. We begin by conceptualizing childhood as a social construct whose meaning has changed over time and that varies across context; for class privileged individuals, for example, childhood or adolescence may extend into the third decade of life, whereas for “others,” poverty and/or family responsibilities and community struggles may mean it scarcely exists at all. The bulk of the course draws from ethnographic scholarship focused on the relationship between childhood and inequality in key institutional contexts including school, family and the legal system. Through ethnography, we will critically examine the ways in which inequalities among and between groups of children shape their daily life experiences, aspirations and opportunities, and what this means for overall trends of inequality in the United States.

 

COLQ 335 – Transgender Histories
Wednesday  2:00-4:30 p.m.
Jen Manion

 

A revolution in transgender rights in the United States is underway. Once marginalized and denigrated by mainstream society, the medical establishment, the legal system, and even the lesbian and gay rights movement, transgender people are increasingly gaining rights and recognition. This seminar will introduce students to transgender representations and experiences in the past as a researchable subject. Students will be introduced to the three dimensions of historic research: theory, method, and archives. The course will focus on the key theories of gender that have informed historic research for the past forty years, the methodological issues involved in conducting research of sexual and gender minority communities, and effective strategies for defining the parameters of a usable archive. Some questions to be engaged include: What is gender? What is transgender? What constitutes a transgender past? How does the historian determine correct terminology for writing? What role does history play in the present or future? Students will write their own prospectus for a research project in transgender history.  This course is part of a model of tutorials at Amherst designed to enable students to engage in substantive research with faculty in the humanities and humanistic social sciences.

 

SWAG 203/BLST 203/ENGL 216 – Women Writers of Africa
Wednesday  2:00-4:30 p.m.
Carol Y. Bailey

 

The term “Women Writers” suggests, and perhaps assumes, a particular category. How useful is this term in describing the writers we tend to include under the frame? And further, how useful are the designations "African" and "African Diaspora"? We will begin by critically examining these central questions, and revisit them frequently as we read specific texts and the body of works included in this course. Our readings comprise a range of literary and scholarly works by canonical and more recent female writers from Africa, the Caribbean, and continental America. Framed primarily by Postcolonial Criticism, our explorations will center on how writers treat historical and contemporary issues specifically connected to women’s experiences, as well as other issues, such as globalization, modernity, and sexuality. We will consider the continuities and points of departure between writers, periods, and regions, and explore the significance of the writers’ stylistic choices. Here our emphasis will be on how writers appropriate vernacular and conventional modes of writing.

 

SWAG 208/BLST 345/ENGL 276/FAMS 379 – Black Feminist Literary Traditions

Monday, Wednesday  12:30-1:50 p.m.

Aneeka A. Henderson

 

Through a close reading of texts by African American authors, we will critically examine the characterization of female protagonists, with a specific focus on how writers negotiate literary forms alongside race, gender, sexuality, and class in their work. Coupled with our explication of poems, short stories, novels, and literary criticism, we will explore the stakes of adaptation in visual culture. Students will analyze the film and television adaptations of The Color Purple (1985), The Women of Brewster Place (1989), and Their Eyes Were Watching God (2005). Authors will include Toni Morrison, Zora Neale Hurston, Alice Walker, Gwendolyn Brooks, and Gloria Naylor. Expectations include three writing projects, a group presentation, and various in-class assignments.

 

SWAG 215 – (Self) Representations of Trans Identities
Monday, Wednesday  12:30-1:50 p.m.
Jessica A. Vooris

 

It is said that we have reached a "transgender tipping" point regarding trans representation in the media over the last ten years, as trans people in the United States and around the world have become increasingly visible to a public audience. This course challenges the idea that trans people are a "new" twenty-first century phenomenon and introduces students to examples of gender non-conformity and transgender identities across time and cultures. The first half of the course examines representations of trans people within sexology, psychology, the medical archive, and the mainstream media, while the second half examines autobiographical accounts written by trans people themselves. We will read memoirs and comics, watch films, and listen to podcasts produced for, by, and about trans people. Assignments will include an analytical essay, creative responses to class texts, and a group project.

 

SWAG 225/ARHA 226/EUST 226/HIST 226 – Women and War in European History, 1558-1918
Monday, Wednesday  2:00-3:20 p.m.
Ellen R. Boucher

 

Although overlooked in military histories until recently, women have long been actively involved in warfare: as combatants, as victims, as workers, and as symbols. This course examines both the changing role of women, and the shifting constructions of “womanhood,” in four major European conflicts: the wars of Elizabeth I in sixteenth-century England, the wars and peace of Marie de Médicis in seventeenth-century France, the French Revolution, and the First World War. Using methodologies drawn from Art History and History, the course seeks to understand the gendered nature of warfare. Why are images of women and the family central to the iconography of war, and how have representations of womanhood shifted according to the aims of particular conflicts? To what extent do women’s experiences of warfare differ from men’s, and can war be considered a source of women’s liberation or oppression? Students will analyze a range of historical images in conjunction with primary source texts from these conflicts and will also develop an original research project related to the course’s themes. Two class meetings per week.

 

SWAG 236/SPAN 243 – Queer Migrant Imaginaries
Monday, Wednesday  2:00-3:20 p.m.
Sony Coranez Bolton

 

This class explores the political economy of the largely queer and feminized labor that animates capitalism’s global reach. Through close readings of literary and audiovisual texts, we will chart how the migrant laboring body has been produced since the nineteenth century using recurring tropes of queerness, pathology, and dependency. Some of the artists we will discuss include writers Carlos Bulosan, Monique Truong, and Gloria Anzaldúa, and documentary film directors Tomer Heymann (Paper Dolls, 2006), and Antonio Santini and Dan Sickles (Mala Mala, 2014). Conducted in English.

 

SWAG 246/BLST 246 – Introduction to Black Girlhood Studies
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:20 a.m.
Dominique Hill

 

The course introduces students to theories, methods, and analytical approaches to the study of Black girlhood.  Students will interrogate Black girlhood as a political category of identity and symbol of agency, addressing such topics as foundations of the field, utility of the categories of "girl" and "woman" and representation of Black girlhood in academic literature and popular culture. We will explore problems pressing upon the lives of Black girls with respect to their lived experiences of work, sexuality, and education and illuminate the strategies, genius and potential of Black girls and Black girlhood. Working within and beyond Black radical hip hop feminist frameworks, our learning will involve thinking through and embodying theories and practices—emancipatory, humanizing, radical acts—as produced by Black girls, artists, and scholars. Class materials will include journal articles, films, novels, music and student-generated ethnographic observations.

 

SWAG 279/BLST 202/ENGL 279 – Global Women’s Literature
Tuesday, Thursday  8:30-9:50 a.m.
Krupa Shandilya

 

What do we mean by “women’s fiction”? How do we understand women’s genres in different national contexts? This course examines topics in feminist thought such as marriage, sexuality, desire and the home in novels written by women writers from South Asia, Africa and the Caribbean. We will draw on postcolonial literary theory, essays on transnational feminism and historical studies to situate our analyses of these novels. Texts include South African writer Nadine Gordimer’s My Son’s Story, Indian novelist Kiran Desai’s The Inheritance of Loss, and Caribbean author Shani Mootoo’s Cereus Blooms at Night.

 

SWAG 301 – Queer Theory and Practice
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:50 p.m.
Khary O. Polk

Using theories and approaches from the discipline of performance studies, the explicit mission of the seminar is to acquaint students with the study of LGBT history, politics, and culture while also strengthening student research skills in four overlapping areas: archival research, close-reading, performance analysis, and community engagement-as-activism. Course activities include working in the Amherst College Frost Archives, the production of a performance piece, and structured engagement with contemporary LGBT activism in the Pioneer Valley and the larger world.
 

SWAG 303/ANTH 305 - On Display:  Race and Reproduction in Film and Media
Monday 2:00-5:00 p.m.
Haile Cole

Reproductive Justice operates at the intersections of both reproductive rights and social justice. In its simplest form, it is a framework that addresses the right to have a child or not as well as the right to parent and raise a child in a healthy and safe environment. Using this framework as an analytical lens, this course seeks to examine representations of race and reproduction in film and media. Given growing national and international interest in maternal health disparities in the United States, reproduction and race currently sit center stage for broad public consumption. Yet, the exhibition of reproductive bodies is not a new phenomenon. This course will examine film (both documentary and popular) as well as other visual media presentations in order to extrapolate the ways in which film and media 1) have depicted historically and continue to depict reproduction, 2) perpetuate and/or challenge stereotypes and the status quo, and 3) (re)create and/or challenge systems of power and social hierarchy. Each week students will view a film and read a set of accompanying texts that will address a variety of topics related to race, reproduction, and health.

 

SWAG 317/EUST 317/SPAN 317 – Women in Early Modern Spain
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:50 p.m.
Catherine V. Infante

 

This course will examine the diverse and often contradictory representations of women in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Spain as seen through the eyes of both male and female writers. This approach will allow us to inquire into how women represented themselves versus how they were understood by men. In our analysis of this topic, we will also take into consideration some scientific, legal, and moral discourses that attempted to define the nature and value of women in early modern Spain. Works by authors such as Cervantes, María de Zayas, Calderón de la Barca, and Catalina de Erauso, among others, will offer us fascinating examples and different approaches to the subject. Conducted in Spanish.

 

SWAG 329/BLST 377/ENGL 368 – Bad Black Women
Monday, Wednesday 2:00-3:20 p.m.
Aneeka A. Henderson

 

History has long valorized passive, obedient, and long-suffering African American women alongside assertive male protagonists and savants. This course provides an alternative narrative to this representation by exploring the ways in which African American female characters, writers, and artists have challenged ideals of stoicism and submission. Using an interdisciplinary focus, we will critically examine transgression across time and space in diverse twentieth- and early twenty-first century literary, sonic, and visual texts. Expectations include three writing projects, a group presentation, and various in-class assignments.

 

SWAG 351 – From Birth to Death: LGBTQ Life Trajectories
Tuesday, Thursday 11:30-12:50 p.m.
Jessica A. Vooris

 

Thinking through questions about age, identity formation, reproduction, and family structures, this course explores gender and sexuality across the life-span, from conception to the end of life. Some of these questions include: What is a queer child? When and how do people discover their sexuality and gender identity? What does a polyamorous family look like? Can trans women breast-feed their children? What are the distinctive features of aging and mourning in many LGBTQ communities? Throughout the course we will challenge heteronormative ideas about what it means to live a good life and the class will explore how some LGBTQ folks have created new ways of being and living. Interdisciplinary in nature, this course assigns scholarship from a variety of fields including psychology, biology, literature, queer theory, feminist theory, anthropology, and history. Students should expect to read a variety of theoretical texts, along with poetry, comics, photo-essays and memoirs.

 

SWAG 400/POSC 407 – Contemporary Debates: Gender and Right-Wing Populism
Wednesday  2:00-4:30 p.m.
Amrita Basu

 

The current iteration of this seminar will explore the consequences of neoliberalism, cultural conservatism, Islamophobia, and anti-immigrant sentiments for women of different social and economic strata as well as women’s divergent political responses. Why have some women become prominent right wing leaders and activists while others have allied with leftist, anti-racist, and other progressive forces to fight for the rights of women and other marginalized groups? How have transnational forces influenced both forms of women’s activism? To what extent are there cross-national similarities in the impact of the far right surge on women, gender and sexuality? The seminar will draw on examples from many different regions of the world, with particular attention to India and the U.S. There will be a final research paper for this course.

 

SWAG 411/POSC 411 – Indigenous Women and World Politics
Wednesday 2:00-4:30 p.m.
Manuela Picq

 

Indigenous women are rarely considered actors in world politics. Yet from their positions of marginality, they are shaping politics in significant ways. This course inter-weaves feminist and Indigenous approaches to suggest the importance of Indigenous women’s political contributions. It is an invitation not merely to recognize their achievements but also to understand why they matter to international relations.  This course tackles varied Indigenous contexts, ranging from pre-conquest gender relations to the 1994 Zapatista uprising. We will learn how Indigenous women played diplomatic roles and led armies into battle during colonial times. We will analyze the progressive erosion of their political and economic power, notably through the introduction of property rights, to understand the intersectional forms of racial, class, and gender violence. Course materials explore the linkages between sexuality and colonization, revealing how sexual violence was a tool of conquest, how gender norms were enforced and sexualities disciplined. In doing so, we will analyze indigenous women’s relationship to feminism as well as their specific struggles for self-determination. We will illustrate the sophistication of their current activism in such cases as the Maya defense of collective intellectual property rights. As we follow their struggles from the Arctic to the Andes, we will understand how indigenous women articulate local, national, and international politics to challenge state sovereignty.

 

SWAG 469/ASLC 452/FAMS 322 – South Asian Feminist Cinema
Tuesday  1:00-3:30 p.m.
Krupa Shandilya

 

How do we define the word “feminism”? Can the term be used to define cinematic texts outside the Euro-American world? In this course we will study a range of issues that have been integral to feminist theory—the body, domesticity, same sex desire, gendered constructions of the nation, feminist utopias and dystopias—through a range of South Asian cinematic texts. Through our viewings and readings we will consider whether the term “feminist” can be applied to these texts, and we will experiment with new theoretical lenses for exploring these films. Films will range from Satyajit Ray’s classic masterpiece Charulata to Gurinder Chadha’s trendy diasporic film, Bend It Like Beckham. Attendance for screenings on Monday is compulsory.

 

 

 

CSI 168 – Decolonizing Black and Brown Bodies
Monday, Wednesday  1:00-2:20 p.m.
Tammy Owens

 

Black and brown bodies have been weighed down for centuries with racial stereotypes and ideologies. These stereotypes and ideologies have constructed centuries-long narratives that construct black and brown bodies as "things" to be feared, used, killed, and forcibly contained. In essence, negative narratives around black and brown bodies have rendered black and brown people outside of humanity. In this interdisciplinary course, students will examine the history of racialization that black and brown bodies have experienced in American culture from the nineteenth century to present. We will also explore the ways black and brown people have worked to counter racial stereotypes and decolonize black and brown bodies through social movements, art, writing, films, music, photography, social media, and theatre. Throughout the semester, students will produce an original theatrical production of monologues based on the process of decolonizing black and brown bodies for their final project.

 

CSI 178 – Harlem Herstories:  A Women’s Cultural History of Harlem
Wednesday  4:30-7:30 p.m.
Zahra Caldwell

 

This course will explore the history of Harlem through a woman's lens. It will trace the historical, social, and political narrative of this historic New York neighborhood. Within this narrative, students will particularly consider the intersecting roles of women and culture in Harlem's substantial legacy. Life narratives we will interrogate include Zora Neale Hurston, Billie Holiday, Sonia Sanchez, Yuri Kochiyama, and Rosie Perez. We will conduct an interdisciplinary deep dive into the construction of all that makes Harlem a landmark space in all of its historical constructions.

 

CSI 184 – Ethnographies of Latin America
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:50 p.m.
Roosbelinda Cardenas
component

 

This course explores central topics in contemporary Latin American society and politics by reading recent ethnographic works. The course does a very brief historical introduction to the region and then moves on to analyze current issues by focusing on how historical landscapes of difference and inequality are challenged and reproduced. Our entry point will be the neoliberal turn, which began in the 1970s Chile and continued throughout most of Latin America in the 80s and 90s. In order to get a firm grasp on the term, we will devote significant time to a broad theoretical discussion of "neoliberalism." We will then turn to situated ethnographies that provide a more in-depth portrait of how neoliberalism has transformed various facets of rural and urban life in Latin America including agrarian politics, the state, violence, democratization, immigration, as well as the impact of all of these on racial, gender, and class (in)equality. Towards the end of the course, we will consider some of the ways in which social actors in the region have begun to resist or circumvent neoliberal hegemony and, in the process, constructed what some are calling post-neoliberalism or even anti-neoliberalism. Unlike its predecessor, post-neoliberalism is not a cohesive political project but rather a fragmented and uneven set of responses and propositions. Hence, this final part of the course will necessarily be more exploratory. Part of our challenge will be figuring out what kind of change is taking place in Latin America today.

 

CSI 206 – The Politics of Gender, Class and Sexuality in Mainstream Bollywood Films
Wednesday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Fadia Hasan

 

The Politics of Gender, Class and Sexuality is investigated through the deconstruction of mainstream Hindi Language Films, popularly known as Bollywood Films. The intersection-alities of these social tropes are analyzed by tracing them through key time-periods of South Asia. These socio-cultural tropes will further be explored to chart the extent to which constructions and representations of gender, class and sexuality has transformed to reflect and co-construct culture and society.

 

CSI 208 – Queer Feelings:  The Emotional and Affective Life of Gender, Sexuality and Race
Monday, Wednesday  10;30-11:50 a.m.
Stephen Dillon

 

In the last decade, queer scholars have turned away from the study of identity and textuality to consider the role of affect and emotion in the production, circulation, and regulation of sexuality, race, and gender. This course examines a new body of work in queer studies, feminist studies, and sexuality studies that explores emotion and affect as central to operation of social, political, and economic power. Topics will include, mental illness, hormones, happiness, sex, trauma, labor, identity, and social movements, among others. Students will work to consider how emotions and affect are connected to larger systems of power like capitalism; white supremacy; heteropatriarchy; terrorism and war; the prison; the media; and medicine.

 

CSI 221 – Restricting Bodies, Building Boundaries:  Population Control and its Impacts
Monday  1:00-3:50 p.m.
Anne Hendrixson
component

 

Populationism refers to "ideologies that attribute social and ecological ills to human numbers" (Butler and Angus 2011, xxi). In this class, we will examine three dimensions of populationism: demo-, geo- and bio. Demopopulationism refers to knowledges, practices and policies that blame human numbers for global problems in order to rationalize efforts to reduce population growth and "optimize" population composition along the lines of race and class. We will look at past and contemporary population control efforts targeted at poor, cisgendered women of color in the global South and the US. Geopopulationism describes racialized, socio-spatial segregation including the strengthening of borders, detainment, and climate change adaptation strategies that involve dispossession, displacement, and discriminatory redistribution of land and natural resources. We will examine a range of geopopulationist projects, which could include mass incarceration in the US; strategic use of the concept of "climate" refugees to justify building borders; and land and water seizure by private corporations and government developers that forces population displacement. Biopopulationism refers to the commodification of bodies and lifestyles that value some lives over others. As examples, we will explore issues like pharmaceutical testing on bodies in parts of the global South to benefit consumers seated primarily in the global North, as well as issues of unequal reproduction, like international surrogacy.

 

CSI 225 – From Choice to Justice:  The Politics of the Abortion Debate
Tuseday, Thursday  1:00-2:20 p.m.
Marlene Fried

 

Abortion rights continue to be contested in the U.S. and throughout the world. Since the legalization of abortion in the U.S. in 1973, there have been significant erosions in abortion rights and access to abortion. Harassment of abortion clinics, providers, and clinic personnel by opponents of abortion is routine, and there have been several instances of deadly violence. This course examines the abortion debate in the U.S., looking historically at the period before legalization up to the present. We explore the ethical, political and legal dimensions of the issue and investigate the anti-abortion and abortion rights movements. We view the abortion battle in the U.S. in the wider context of reproductive justice. Specific topics of inquiry include: abortion worldwide, coercive contraception and sterilization abuse, welfare rights, population control, and the criminalization of pregnancy.

 

CSI 266 – The Anthropology of Reproduction
Monday, Wednesday  10:30-11:50 a.m.
Pamela Stone

 

This course focuses on the biological and cultural components of reproduction from an evolutionary and cross-cultural perspective. Beginning with the evolution of the pelvis, this course examines the nutritional problems, growth and developmental problems, health problems, and the trauma that can affect successful childbirth. The birth process will be studied for reproductive females in the ancient world, historical trends in obstetrics, and worldwide rates of maternal mortality today will also be used to understand the risks that some birthers face. Birthing customs and beliefs will be examined for indigenous females in a number of different cultural contexts. We will examine the technocratic model of childbirth to understand the changing focus of birth as female centered to a medical condition, which needs to be controlled. In addition, we will consider changing understandings of the birthing body.

 

CSI 290 – Colonial and Decolonial Archives:  Historical Research Methods
Wednesday  1:00-3:50 p.m.
Jutta Sperling
component

 

This course is a methods-course for all students interested in historical inquiry that introduces students to primary research and various theoretical frameworks. We will start out by reading Gayatri Spivak's essay "Can the Subaltern Speak?" that problematizes the difficulties of writing the history of disenfranchised peoples, then trace the after-life of her famous essay in South-Asian post-colonial and Latin American de-colonial historiography, and finally engage with Laura Ann Stoler's work on Dutch colonial archives and the politics of imperial intimacy. Students will pursue their own primary research in the various colonial and de-colonial archives at AC, MHC, and SC as well as the museum of art at MHC. These archives contain, among others, letters written by female missionaries in the Ottoman Empire (MHC alumnae), journals written by British governors' wives in India (AC alumni), and late 20th century collections of queer and anti-racist activists (SC alumnae). The aim is to produce a substantial original research paper.

 

CSI 308/HACU 308 – Research Methods in Africana and Feminist Studies
Monday  4:00-7:00 p.m.
Tammy Owens/Doctor Bynum

 

How do researchers and activists ensure that they are doing ethical, intersectional community engaged research and organizing? In this course, we will explore the many intersections of race, class, gender, ability, geography and sexuality in research and activism. Even though research, writing and activism can seem overwhelming and impossible to ethically represent and engage, it's not; what's required is grounding in a clear and ethical methodology. In this course, we will use Africana and feminist approaches to answer the hard questions about ethical and intersectional research. Students will work on their own research projects throughout the course.  Field trip fee: $10

 

HACU 178 – Moving Questions, Writing Dancing:  Approaches to Critical Dance Studies
Tuesday, Thursday  10:30-11:50 a.m.
Dasha Chapman
component

 

How do we ask questions with our bodies? What does dance do in the world and how can it help us understand social identities? What does it mean to write dance and why would we want to do it? This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of critical dance studies and its historical, ethnographic, and theoretical approaches. Dance Studies offers us a way to sharpen our awareness of the impacts of dancing both on and off stage, while also developing our ability to analyze bodies in socio-cultural context. Centered on an exploration of the relationship between theory and practice, we will study many different forms of dance and movement through readings, viewings, discussions, our own embodied practices, interaction with artists and attendance at live performances. Our investigations will be grounded by attention to race, gender, sexuality, nation, class, ability and ethnicity.

 

HACU 221 – What is Feminist Aesthetics?  Critical Strategies and Concepts
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:20 p.m.
Monique Roelofs

 

This course couples approaches in philosophical aesthetics-among others, by Hume, Kant, Schiller, Hegel, Dewey, and Adorno-with work in contemporary aesthetic thought and feminist theory to ask what, today, we might mean by "feminist aesthetics." Likely themes include the various meanings of "interest" and "disinterestedness" and their pertinence to questions of queering, race, poverty, coloniality, and the global; notions of experience, agency, and objecthood; the many modes of feminist art practice; and broadened aesthetic perspectives on information flows, food, humor, activism, and the state.

 

HACU 199 – Feminists Behind the Camera
Friday  9:00-11:50 a.m.
Hope Tucker

 

This course introduces students to the analysis and production of film and video through close examination of works by artists/critics/cultural workers/filmmakers including Chantal Akerman, Anna Atkins, Jane Campion, Vera Chytilova, Julie Dash, Maya Deren, Valie Export, Andrea Fraser, Sara Gomez, Zora Neal Hurston, Trinh T. Minh-Ha, Barbara Loden, Sarah Maldoror, Ulrike Ottinger, Adrian Piper, Yvonne Rainer, Joan Rivers, Martha Rosler, Lorna Simpson, Chick Strand, Carrie Mae Weems, Eudora Welty, and others. Students will learn to read visual images by focusing on the development of media works and their relationship to the historical and cultural context (economic, historical, political, intellectual and artistic) from which they came. Students will screen and read a variety of essential texts and create written and image-driven work in response. Enrolled or top 5 waitlist students who DO NOT attend the first class session risk losing their place on the class roster.

 

HACU 299 – Blackness and the Aesthetic:  Aliveness, Play, Satire, and the Ordinary
Tuesday  6:00-9:00 p.m.
Monique Roelofs
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This course explores convergences between categories of blackness and the aesthetic. Pointing to the centrality of aesthetic frameworks and concepts to black thought and cultural production, we will examine conceptual frames and artistic/literary strategies shaping the burgeoning field of Black Aesthetics, as exemplified by recent practices and theories. What role do evolving notions of the aesthetic, the political, and blackness play in shifts that are occurring in the field? How do understandings of aliveness, play, satire, gender, race, queering, and the everyday take form in current work? What new questions arise? Artworks in multiple media and traditions will be considered. The course will develop synergies with the "Questioning Aesthetics Symposium: Black Aesthetics II" that will take place at Hampshire College in April 2019.

 

IA 263 – Strange, Marvelous and Uneasy:  A Fiction Workshop Centering Work by Women
Tuesday  5:30-8:20 p.m.
Nathalie Arnold

 

The course is designed for creative writers interested in the 'literary magical,' in women's visions, and in discovering the richness of their own imaginations - in a powerful literary vein that will adhere to conventions of no particular genre. Students will be asked to: reimagine the real; write the future, the past, or the now, as they flourish in their own imaginarium; and discover what strange and unique visions might invigorate their writing. We will focus on works by women who, while often obscured in discussions of surrealism, have long been engaged in 'writing the world askew.' Students' writing will be guided by the readings. Authors we will read include writers from Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, and North America. Possible readings by: Lesley Nneka Arimah, Ramona Ausubel, Leonora Carrington, Shelly Jackson, Shirley Jackson, Kelly Link, Nobuka Takagi, Clarice Lispector, Helen Oyeyemi, Silvina Ocampo, Nnedi Okorafor, and Ali Smith. Prerequisite: A writing class, preferably in creative writing, with intensive peer review and revision.

IA 246 - Loveable Runaways
Wednesday  1:00-3:50 p.m.
Khan, Uzma

From Huckleberry Finn to Catcher in the Rye, the world is rich in stories that depict loveable young men resisting entrenched societal norms. But where are the loveable women and gender non-conformists, young and old, and of color? Our course will look at those living under silencing, societal constraints, both in the West and East, who, denied the same liberties as the dominant group that creates the boundaries, in one way or another become 'runaways,' often simply by claiming their fundamental worth. 

NS 284 – The City, Society, and Public Health
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:50 p.m.
Fayana Richards
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This course will investigate the social production of space and place within urban settings and its relationship to human health and wellbeing. We will consider historical conceptualizations and contemporary conversations regarding urban space and city design and its connection to broader political, economic and sociocultural processes. We will examine these processes through topics such as: globalization; social marginalization and the utilization of public and private space; food insecurity; environmental racism and segregation; the impact of infrastructure divestment on population health; intersections of race, class and gender on urban health inequities and many others. We will also explore how individuals and populations assign meaning to space and place and its implications for public health due to urban renewal and forced relocations. There are no prerequisites for the course, but a previous course in anthropology or public health is recommended.

 

 

GNDST 201 – Methods and Practices in Feminist Scholarship
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Jacquelyne Luce

 

This is a class about doing research as a feminist. We will explore questions such as: What makes feminist research feminist? What makes it research? What are the proper objects of feminist research? Who can do feminist research? What can feminist research do? Are there feminist ways of doing research? Why and how do the stories we tell in our research matter? Some of the key issues and themes we will address include: accountability, location, citational practices and politics, identifying stakes and stakeholders, intersectionality, inter/disciplinarity, choosing and describing our topics and methods, and research as storytelling. The class will be writing intensive and will culminate in each student producing a research portfolio.

 

GNDST 204CP/CST 249 – Trap Doors and Glittering Closets: Queer/Trans* of Color Politics of Recognition, Legibility, Visibility and Aesthetics
Monday, Wednesday  11:00-12:15 p.m.
Ren-yo Hwang

 

In 2014, Time magazine declared the "Transgender Tipping Point" as a popular moment of transgender people's arrival into the mainstream. Using a queer and trans* of color critique, this course will unpack the political discourses and seeming binaries surrounding visibility/invisibility, recognition/misrecognition, legibility/illegibility, belonging/unbelonging and aesthetics/utility. How might we grapple with the contradictions of the trapdoors, pitfalls, dark corners and glittering closets that structure and normalize violence for some while safeguarding violence for others? This course will center the 2017 anthology Trap Door: Trans Cultural Production and the Politics of Visibility.

 

GNDST 204QT/ENGL 219QT – Queer and Trans Writing
Thursday  1:30-4:20 p.m.
Andrea Lawlor

 

What do we mean when we say "queer writing" or "trans writing"? Are we talking about writing by queer and/or trans authors? Writing about queer or trans practices, identities, experience? Writing that subverts conventional forms? All of the above? In this course, we will engage these questions not theoretically but through praxis. We will read fiction, poetry, comics, creative nonfiction, and hybrid forms. Expect to encounter work that challenges you in terms of form and content. Some writers we may read include Ryka Aoki, James Baldwin, Tom Cho, Samuel R. Delany, kari edwards, Elisha Lim, Audre Lorde, Cherríe Moraga, Eileen Myles, and David Wojnarowicz.

 

GNDST 206CG/HIST 296CG – Women and Gender in China
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Lan Wu

 

This 200-level seminar introduces students to gender relations in the history of China. It offers students a broad historical narrative of women's lives from early China through the imperial period, and concludes with the power dynamics of gender relations in modern China in the twentieth century. The course is organized chronologically with thematic focus on the politics of marriage and reproduction; the state's shifting perspectives on women's social roles; and how women interpreted and responded to the changing cultural landscape.

 

GNDST 210NR/RELIG 225NR – Women in New Religious Movements
Monday, Wednesday  11:00-12:15 p.m.
Meredith F. Coleman-Tobias

 

Many new religious movements have advocated for women occupying unlikely roles of service and leadership. This course analyzes the intersection of religious alterity and gender equity. Primarily focusing on twentieth and twenty-first century new religions, the course considers how select women have shaped and transformed the structures of religions on the margins.

 

GNDST 212HR – Human Rights Lab: Transnational Perspectives on LGBTQI and Women’s Rights
Wednesday  1:30-4:20 p.m.
Veronica Zebadua Yanez

 

The course will study the contemporary state of LGBTQI and Women's Rights worldwide and the strategies available to further them. At once a seminar and a practice-based workshop, students will learn about international human rights law, human rights monitoring and accountability mechanisms, and gender justice policies. Students will simulate writing UN reports, International NGO reports, country-based NGO reports, and undertake research on LGBTQI and women's rights violations. The focus topics will be gender-based violence, humanitarian policy, transitional justice, and economic empowerment. Several practitioners will join the course throughout the semester.

 

GNDST 241HP/ANTHR 216HP – Feminist Health Politics
Tuesday, Thursday  1:30-2:45 p.m.
Jacquelyne Luce

 

Health is about bodies, selves and politics. We will explore a series of health topics from feminist perspectives. How do gender, sexuality, class, disability, and age influence the ways in which one perceives and experiences health and the access one has to health information and health care? Are heteronormativity, cissexism, or one's place of living related to one's health status or one's health risk? By paying close attention to the relationships between community-based narratives, activities of health networks and organizations and theory, we will develop a solid understanding of the historical, political and cultural specificities of health issues, practices, services and movements.

 

GNDST 333BD – Rethinking the Sexual Body
Thursday  1:30-4:20 p.m.
Angela Willey

 

This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary feminist study of sexuality. Its primary goal is to provide a forum for students to consider histories of sexuality and race in the U.S. both in terms of theoretical frameworks within gender studies, and in terms of a range of sites where those theoretical approaches become material, are negotiated, or are shifted. The course is a fully interdisciplinary innovation. It will emphasize links rather than differences between theory and practice and between cultural, material, and historical approaches to the body, gender, and sexuality. Throughout the course we will consider contemporary sexual politics in light of the co-constitutive histories of racial and sexual formations in science and culture.

 

GNDST 333CF/CST 349CF -- Survived, Punished and (Un)Deserving: Feminist Participatory Action Research Against Carceral Feminisms
Wednesday  1:30-4:20 p.m.
Ren-yo Hwang

 

This course will consider the critical intervention of #SurvivedAndPunished, and the idea of "survivor defense as abolitionist praxis." Using principles and case studies from feminist and critical race action research, we will investigate the concepts of transformative justice, carceral feminism and anti-violence alongside the binaries of deserving/undeserving and good-victim/non-victim criminal. How does this relate to the corrective notions of rehabilitation, redemption and restitution? What does the criminalization of survivors of violence (i.e., gendered, racial, intimate partner, sexual and state violence) tell us about our limited views of justice and collective healing from harm?

 

GNDST 333EM/CST 349EM – Flesh and Blood: Naturecultural Embodiments
Tuesday  1:30-4:20 p.m.
Christian Gundermann

 

What does it mean to be (in?) a body? Who counts as whole, broken or food? How do discipline, punishment, use, reproduction, and illness come into play? What are agency, animacy, knowledge, consciousness in relation to embodiment? Western rationality has produced and disciplined a coherent, bounded, defended, racialized, and gendered bodily Self through medicine, psychiatry, nutrition, education, sexology, thanatology, obstetrics, and other disciplines. We will explore this production and its continual undoing, through topics such as medical diagnosis, disability, death and burial cultures, infection, diet, breastfeeding and dairy, chronic illness, depression, queerness, and hormone replacement.

 

GNDST 333DH/ENGL 373DH – Desperate Housewives in 19th- through early 20th-century American Literature
Wednesday  1:30-4:20 p.m.
Leah B. Glasser

 

This course will explore visual and literary images of nineteenth through early 20th-century marriage and motherhood. Discussion of Virginia's Woolf's 'A Room of One's Own' and Barbara Welter's essay 'The Cult of True Womanhood' will serve as the springboard for our focus on representations of women in the home. We will incorporate a visit to the art museum, and will analyze film adaptations of some of the texts we read. The course will focus primarily on American literature, film, and art, with the exception of Ibsen's A Doll's House; selected written texts will include works by writers such as Hawthorne, James, Stowe, Gilman, Freeman, Chopin, Hurston, and Wharton.

 

 

GNDST 333GS/PSYCH 319GS – Gender and Sexual Minority Health
Monday, Wednesday  11:00-12:15 p.m.
Corey E. Flanders

 

This course is a critical overview and investigation of health as it relates to the experiences of gender and sexual minority people. We will begin with exploring theoretical understandings of health and marginalization, and use those as frameworks to examine various domains of health. Areas of interest will include mental health, sexual and reproductive health, substance use, disability, and issues related to body size and image. We will end by looking at other structural issues that affect gender and sexual minority health, such as access to care, health education, and health policy.

 

GNDST 333HH/ASIAN 340 – Love, Gender-Crossing, and Women’s Supremacy: A Reading of The Story of the Stone
Wednesday  1:30-4:20 p.m.
Ying Wang

 

A seminar on the eighteenth-century Chinese masterpiece The Story of the Stone and selected literary criticism in response to this work. Discussions will focus on love, gender-crossing, and women's supremacy and the paradoxical treatments of these themes in the novel. We will explore multiple aspects of these themes, including the sociopolitical, philosophical, and literary milieus of eighteenth-century China. We will also examine this novel in its relation to Chinese literary tradition in general and the generic conventions of premodern Chinese vernacular fiction in particular.

SWG 238 – International Feminist Political Economy and Activism
Wednesday, Friday  2:40-4:00 p.m.
Elisabeth Brownell Armstrong

 

Flickers of global finance capital across computer screens cannot compare to the travel preparations of women migrating from rural homes to work at computer chip factories. Yet both movements, of capital and people, constitute vital facets of globalization in our current era. This course centers on the political linkages and economic theories that address the politics of women, gender relations and capitalism. We will research social movements that challenge the raced, classed and gendered inequities, and the costs of maintaining order. We will assess the alternatives proposed by social movements like the landless workers movement in Brazil, and economic shifts like the workers cooperative movement. Assignments include community-based research on local and global political movements, short papers, class-led discussions & written reflections.

 

SWG 270 – Oral History and Lesbian Subjects
Monday, Wednesday  9:00-10:20 a.m.
Kelly P. Anderson

 

Grounding our work in the current scholarship in lesbian history, this course explores lesbian, queer and bisexual communities, cultures and activism. While becoming familiar with the existing narratives about lesbian/queer lives, students are introduced to the method of oral history as a key documentation strategy in the production of lesbian history. What are the gaps in the literature and how can oral history assist in filling in the spaces? What does a historical narrative that privileges categories of gender and sexuality look like? And how do we need to adapt our research methods, including oral history, in order to talk about lesbian/queer lives? Our texts include secondary literature on 20th-century lesbian cultures and communities, oral history theory and methodology, and primary sources from the Sophia Smith Collection (SSC). Students conduct, transcribe, edit and interpret their own interviews for their final project.

 

SWG 271 – Reproductive Justice
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:20 p.m.
Carrie N. Baker

 

This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of reproductive health, rights and justice in the United States, examining history, activism, law, policy, and public discourses related to reproduction. A central framework for analysis is how gender, race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, disability and nationality intersect to shape people’s experiences of reproductive oppression and their resistance strategies. Topics include eugenics and the birth control movement; the reproductive rights and justice movements; U.S. population control policies; criminalization of pregnant people; fetal personhood and birth parents’ citizenship; the medicalization of reproduction; reproductive technologies; the influence of disability, incarceration and poverty on pregnancy and parenting; the anti-abortion movement; and reproductive coercion and violence.

 

SWG 290 – Gender, Sexuality and Popular Culture
Monday, Wednesday  1:10-2:30 p.m.
Jennifer M. DeClue

 

In this course we will consider the manner in which norms of gender and sexuality are reflected, reinforced, and challenged in popular culture. We use theories of knowledge production, representation, and meaning-making to support our analysis of the relationship between discourse and power; our engagement with these theoretical texts helps us track this dynamic as it emerges in popular culture. Key queer theoretical concepts provide a framework for examining how the production gender and sexuality impacts cultural production. Through our critical engagement with a selection of films, music, television, visual art, and digital media we will discuss mainstream conventions and the feminist, queer, and queer of color interventions that enliven the landscape of popular culture with which we contend in everyday life.

 

SWG 314 – Documenting Queer Lives
Tuesday  1:00-4:00 p.m.
Jennifer M. DeClue

 

This course examines visual and literary documentations of queer life by reading memoirs and screening short and feature length documentaries films. We consider the power and value of documenting queer lives while examining the politics of visibility as impacted by race, class and gender. We will attend to the expansiveness of the term “queer” and consider the performativity of gender and the fluidity of sexuality in our analysis of each text. Students will produce a short film, write a short biography or propose another mode of documenting experiences of queer life as members of, or in solidarity with, the LGBT community.

 

AFR 212 – Family Matters: Representations, Policy and the Black Family
Monday, Wednesday  1:10-2:30 p.m.
Diana Ashley Burnett

 

In this course we examine contemporary African-American families from both a sociocultural and socioeconomic perspective. We explore the issues facing African-American families as a consequence of the intersecting of race, class and gender categories of America. The aim of this course is to broaden the student’s knowledge of the internal dynamics and diversity of African-American family life and to foster a greater understanding of the internal strengths as well as the vulnerabilities of the many varieties of African-American families.

 

AFR 289 – Race, Feminism and Resistance in Movements for Social Change
Tuesday, Thursday  9:00-10:20 a.m.
Samuel Galen Ng

 

This interdisciplinary colloquial course explores the historical and theoretical perspectives of African American women from the time of slavery to the post-civil rights era. A central concern of the course is the examination of how black women shaped and were shaped by the intersectionality of race, gender and sexuality in American culture.

 

AFR 366 – Afro-Brazilian Culture
Tuesday  1:00-2:50 p.m.
Flavia Santos De Araujo
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Considering the myth of a “racial democracy”, how have black Brazilian artists constructed memory and identity through their artistic production? How do the politics of race, gender, class, sexuality, and national identity shape Afro-Brazilian cultural (con)texts? This course explores a multi-genre selection of Afro- Brazilian literary texts from the 20th and 21st centuries to examine the connections between cultural production and identity politics. Our study will also consider other types of Afro-Brazilian artistic expressions such as music, performance, and visual culture. This course also provides an opportunity for students to develop comparative inquiries on the black diasporic experience.

 

AMS 201 – Introduction to the Study of American Society and Culture
Tuesday, Thursday  10:30-11:50 a.m.
Christen Mucher, Kevin L. Rozario
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An introduction to the methods and concerns of American studies. We draw on literature, painting, architecture, landscape design, social and cultural criticism, and popular culture to explore such topics as responses to economic change, ideas of nature and culture, America’s relationship to Europe, the question of race, the roles of women, family structure, social class and urban experience.

 

AMS 220 – Dance, Music, Sex, Romance
Monday, Wednesday  1:10-2:30 p.m.
Steve Waksman

 

Since the 1950s rock ’n’ roll and other forms of youth-oriented popular music in the U.S. have embodied rebellion. Yet the rebellion that rock and other popular music styles like rap have offered has often been more available to men than women. Similarly, the sexual liberation associated with popular music in the rock and rap eras has been far more open to “straight” desires over “queer.” This course examines how popular music from the 1950s to the present has been shaped by gender and sexuality, and the extent to which the music and its associated cultural practices have allowed artists and audiences to challenge gender and sexual norms, or alternately have served to reinforce those norms albeit with loud guitars and a heavy beat.

 

AMS 241 – Disability in Popular Culture
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:20 p.m.
Sarah Orem
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From butt-kicking warriors like Imperator Furiosa, to state leaders like New York governor David Paterson and former president FDR, to ultra-glamorous models like Jillian Mercado and Nyle DiMarco, images of and persons with disabilities have shaped the discourse of American popular culture. Though popular literary genres have long framed disability as tragic or pitiable, disabled writers have successfully appropriated popular, commercial styles to leverage critiques against dominant conceptions of disability. The purpose of this course is to investigate what arguments these popular texts make, whether implicitly or explicitly, about disability.

 

ANT 267 – Contemporary South Asia
Tuesday, Thursday  10:30-11:50 a.m.
Pinky Hota
component

 

This course introduces students to the culture, politics and everyday life of South Asia. Topics covered include religion, community, nation, caste, gender and development, as well as some of the key conceptual problems in the study of South Asia, such as the colonial construction of social scientific knowledge, and debates over “tradition” and “modernity.” In this way, we address both the varieties in lived experience in the subcontinent and the key scholarly, popular and political debates that have constituted the terms through which we understand South Asian culture. Along with ethnographies, we study and discuss novels, historical analysis, primary historical texts and popular (Bollywood) and documentary film. 

 

ART 278 – Race and Gender in the History of Photography
Monday, Wednesday  9:00-10:20 a.m.
Emma R. Silverman

 

A survey of photography, photographers and the literature of photography. Consideration of the formal, technical, historical and social factors in the development and practice of photography since 1839.

 

CLT 230 – “Unnatural” Women: Mothers Who Kill Their Children
Tuesday, Thursday  3:00-4:50 p.m.
Thalia A. Pandiri

 

Some cultures give the murdering mother a central place in myth and literature while others treat the subject as taboo. How is such a woman depicted—as monster, lunatic, victim, savior? What do the motives attributed to her reveal about a society’s assumptions and values? What difference does it make if the author is a woman? We focus on literary texts but also consider representations in other media, especially cinema. Authors to be studied include Euripides, Seneca, Ovid, Anouilh, Christa Wolff, Christopher Durang, Alice Walker, Toni Morrison and others.

 

EAL 244 – Japanese Women’s Writing
Monday, Wednesday  1:10-2:30 p.m.
Kimberly Kono

 

This course focuses on the writings of Japanese women from the 10th century until the present. We examine the foundations of Japan’s literary tradition represented by such early works as Murasaki Shikibu’s Tale of Genji and Sei Shonagon’s Pillow Book. We then move to the late 19th century to consider the first modern examples of Japanese women’s writing. How does the existence of a “feminine literary tradition” in pre-modern Japan influence the writing of women during the modern period? How do these texts reflect, resist and reconfigure conventional representations of gender? We explore the possibilities and limits of the articulation of feminine and feminist subjectivities, as well as investigate the production of such categories as “race,” class and sexuality in relation to gender and to each other. Taught in English, with no knowledge of Japanese required.

 

ENG 273 – Bloomsbury and Sexuality
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:20 p.m.
Cornelia D.J. Pearsall, Lise A. Sanders

 

Members of the Bloomsbury movement led non-normative (what many now call queer) lives. The complexity and openness of their relationships characterized not only the lives but also the major works of fiction, art, design, and critical writings its members produced. “Sex permeated our conversation,” Woolf recalls, and in Bloomsbury and Sexuality we’ll explore the far-reaching consequences of this ostensible removal of discursive, social, and sexual inhibition in the spheres of literature, art, and social sciences. The course will draw from the art of Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant, the writings of E. M. Forster, Virginia Woolf, Radclyffe Hall, Lytton Strachey, John Maynard Keynes and others, along with contemporary queer theory.

 

ENG 275 – Witches, Witchcraft and Witch Hunts
Monday, Wednesday, Friday  10:00-10:50 a.m.
Michael T. Thurston
component

 

This course has two central ambitions. First, it introduces themes of magic and witchcraft in (mostly) American literature and film. We work together to figure out how the figure of the witch functions in stories, novels and movies, what witches and witchcraft mean or how they participate in the texts’ ways of making meaning. At the same time, we try to figure out how witches and witchcraft function as loci or displacements of social anxiety—about power, science, gender, class, race and politics. Since the identification of witches and the fear of witchcraft often lead to witch panics, we finally examine the historical and cultural phenomenon of the witch hunt, including both the persecution of persons literally marked as witches and the analogous persecution of persons (Communists, sexual outsiders, etc.) figuratively “hunted” as witches have been.

 

FMS 261 – Video Games and the Politics of Play
Monday, Wednesday  2:40-4:00 p.m.
Jennifer C. Malkowski
component

 

An estimated 63% of U.S. households have members who play video games regularly, and game sales routinely exceed film box office figures. As this medium grows in cultural power, it is increasingly important to think about how games make meaning. This course serves as an introduction to Game Studies, equipping students with the vocabulary to analyze video games, surveying the medium’s genres, and sampling this scholarly discipline’s most influential theoretical writing. The particular focus, though, is on the ideology operating beneath the surface of these popular entertainment objects and on the ways in which video games enter political discourse.

 

FRN 230 – Consumers, Culture and the French Department Store
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 11:00-12:10 p.m.
Jonathan Keith Gosnell
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How have French stores and shopping practices evolved since the grand opening of Le Bon Marché in 1869? In what ways have megastores and e-commerce influenced French "culture"? This course examines representations of mass consumption in literature, the press, history, and analyses of French popular and bourgeois traditions, paying particular attention to the role of women in the transactions and development of culture.

 

FRN 230 – Women Writers of Africa and the Caribbean
Tuesday, Thursday  10:30-11:50 a.m.
Dawn Fulton

 

An introduction to works by contemporary women writers from Francophone Africa and the Caribbean. Topics studied include colonialism, exile, motherhood and intersections between class and gender. Our study of these works and of the French language is informed by attention to the historical, political and cultural circumstances of writing as a woman in a former French colony. Texts include works by Mariama Bâ, Maryse Condé, Yamina Benguigui and Marie-Célie Agnant.

 

GOV 233 – Problems in Political Development
Monday, Wednesday  1:10-2:30 p.m.
Anna Kapambwe Mwaba
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This course explores the practical meaning of the term “development” and its impact on a range of global topics from the problems of poverty and income inequality to the spread of democracy, environmental degradation, urbanization and gender empowerment. We examine existing theories of economic development and consider how state governments, international donors and NGOs interact to craft development policy.

 

GOV 267 – Problems in Democratic Thought
Monday, Wednesday  9:00-10:20 a.m.
Gary L. Lehring
component

 

What is democracy? We begin with readings of Aristotle, Rousseau and Mill to introduce some issues associated with the ideal of democratic self-government: participation, equality, majority rule vs. minority rights, the common good, pluralism, community. Readings include selections from liberal, radical, socialist, libertarian, multiculturalist and feminist political thought.

 

HST 270 – Gender and US Imperialism
Tuesday, Thursday 10:30-11:50 a.m.
Holger G. Droessler

 

This course explores the intimate relationship between gender and imperialism from U.S. independence to the present. From colonial visions of virgin lands to nuclear testing on the Bikini atoll, Americans for a long time understood empire through the lens of gender. Among the course’s major themes are indigenous politics, interracial mixing, Atlantic slavery, capitalism, migration, and imperialism in the Pacific. Throughout our discussions, we will pay special attention to the ways in which everyday people colluded and collided with U.S. imperialism.

 

HST 371 – Remembering Slavery: A Gendered Reading of the WPA Interviews
Tuesday 1:00-2:50 p.m.
Elizabeth S. Pryor

 

Despite the particular degradation, violence and despair of enslavement in the United States, African American men and women built families, traditions and a legacy of resistance. Using the WPA interviews—part of the New Deal Federal Writers Project of the 1930s—this course looks at the historical memory of former slaves by reading and listening to their own words. How did 70- through 90-year-old former slaves remember their childhoods and young adulthoods during slavery? And how do scholars make sense of these interviews given they were conducted when Jim Crow segregation was at its pinnacle? The course examines the WPA interviews as historical sources by studying scholarship that relies heavily on them. Most importantly, students explore debates that swirl around the interviews and challenge their validity on multiple fronts, even as they remain the richest sources of African American oral history regarding slavery. Students write an original research paper using the WPA interviews.

 

IDP 208 – Women’s Medical Issues
Tuesday, Thursday  9:00-10:20 a.m.
Leslie Richard Jaffe

 

A study of topics and issues relating to women’s health, including menstrual cycle, contraception, sexually transmitted infections, abortion, mental health, nutrition, osteoporosis, the media’s representation of women and gender bias in health care. Social, cultural, ethical and political issues are considered, as well as an international perspective.

 

ITL 344 – Women in Italian Society: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow
Tuesday, Thursday 10:30-11:50 a.m.
Giovanna Bellesia

 

This course provides an in-depth look at the changing role of women in Italian society. Authors studied include Natalia Ginzburg, Elsa Morante, Dacia Maraini and Elena Ferrante. A portion of the course is dedicated to the new multicultural and multiethnic Italian reality with a selection of texts written during the last 20 years by contemporary women immigrants. Limited enrollment. Permission of the instructor required. Conducted in Italian.

 

PSY 374 – Psychology of Political Activism
Tuesday  1:00-2:50 p.m.
Lauren E. Duncan
component

 

This seminar focuses on people’s motivations to participate in political activism, especially activism around social issues. Readings include theoretical and empirical work from political psychology paired with personal accounts of activists. Weconsider accounts of some large-scale liberal and conservative social movements in the United States. Students conduct an in-depth analysis of an activists oral history obtained from the Voices of Feminism archive of the Sophia Smith collection.

 

REL 226 – Gender, Power and Bioethics in Rabbinic Literature
Tuesday 1:00-4:00 p.m.
Lila Kagedan

 

Pending CAP approval. Explores how the rabbis of the Talmud concerned themselves with bodies particularly in relation to bioethical issues surrounding conception, life, and death. Focuses on the conceptualizations of gender and health in rabbinic literature as well as on questions of power dynamics in Jewish law as it pertains to women specifically.

 

SOC 216 – Social Movements
Monday, Wednesday, Friday  11:00-12:10 p.m.
Marc William Steinberg
component

 

This course provides an in-depth examination of major sociological theories of collective action and social movements. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of social movement dynamics including recruitment and mobilization, strategies and tactic, and movement outcomes. The empirical emphasis is on modern American social movements including student protest, feminist, civil rights and sexual identity movements.

 

SOC 237 – Gender and Globalization
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:50 p.m.
Payal Banerjee

 

This course engages with the various dimensions of globalization through the lens of gender, race and class relations. We study how gender and race intersect in global manufacturing and supply chains as well as in the transnational politics of representation and access in global media, culture, consumption, fashion, food, water, war and dissenting voices.

 

SOC 253 – Sociology of Sexuality: Institutions, Identities and Cultures
Monday, Wednesday  2:40-4:00 p.m.
William Cory Albertson

 

This course examines sexuality from a sociological perspective, focusing on how sexuality is constructed by and structures major social institutions. We examine the social construction of individual and collective identities, norms and behaviors, discourses, institutional regulation, and the place of sexuality in the state, education, science and other institutions, and social movements. Consideration of gender, race, class, time and place are integrated throughout. Topics include the social construction of sexual desire and practice, sexuality and labor, reproduction, science, technology, sexuality and the state, sexuality education, globalization, commodification, and social movements for sexual purity, sexual freedom and against sexual violence.

 

SOC 323 – Gender, Sexuality and Social Movements in Conservative Times
Tuesday  1:00-2:50 p.m.
Nancy E. Whittier

 

This class focuses on challenges to and changes in gender and sexuality during conservative time periods. Focusing on the U.S., we will primarily examine the 1980's and the contemporary period as case studies. We will look how political and other institutions affect gender and sexuality, and at social movements addressing gender and sexuality from both the right and the left. We will look at movements including queer, feminist, anti-racist, anti-interventionist movements on the left, and racial supremacist, pro-military intervention, anti-LGBT, and conservative evangelical movements on the right. Theoretical frameworks are drawn from social movements, intersectional feminist and queer theories.

 

SOC 327 – Global Migration in the 21st Century
Tuesday  3:00-4:50 p.m.
Payal Banerjee

 

This 300-level seminar provides an in-depth engagement with global migration. It covers such areas as theories of migration, the significance of global political economy and state policies across the world in shaping migration patterns and immigrant identities. Questions about imperialism, post-colonial conditions, nation-building/national borders, citizenship and the gendered racialization of immigration intersect as critical contexts for our discussions.