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Academics

Fall 2019 Courses

 

WGSS 187 – Gender, Sexuality and Culture
Monday, Wednesday  10:10-11:00 a.m.
Discussion sections, Friday 9:05, 10:10, 11:15 and 12:30
Kiran Asher

This course offers an introduction to some of the basic concepts and theoretical perspectives in Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies. Drawing on disciplinary, interdisciplinary and cross-cultural studies, students will engage critically with issues such as gender inequities, sexuality, families, work, media images, queer issues, masculinity, reproductive rights, and history. Throughout the course, students will explore how experiences of gender and sexuality intersect with other social constructs of difference, including race/ethnicity, class, and age. Special attention will be paid to the ways in which interlocking systems of oppression have shaped and influenced the historical, cultural, social, political, and economical contexts of our lives, and the social movements at the local, national and transnational levels which have led to key transformations. (Gen. Ed. I, DU)

WGSS 201 – Gender and Difference:  Critical Analyses
Section 1 – Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m. – Laura Ciolkowski
Section 2 – Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m. – Ryan Ambuter

An introduction to the vibrant field of women, gender, and sexuality studies, this course familiarizes students with the basic concepts in the field and draws connections to the world in which we live. An interdisciplinary field grounded in commitment to both intellectual rigor and individual and social transformation, WGSS asks fundamental questions about the conceptual and material conditions of our lives. What are ‘gender,’ ‘sexuality,’ ‘race,’ and ‘class?’ How are gender categories, in particular, constructed differently across social groups, nations, and historical periods? What are the connections between gender and socio-political categories such as race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, (dis)ability and others? How do power structures such as sexism, racism, heterosexism, and classism and others intersect? How can an understanding of gender and power enable us to act as agents of individual and social change? Emphasizing inquiry in transnational feminisms, critical race feminisms, and sexuality studies, this course examines gender within a broad nexus of identity categories, social positions, and power structures. Areas of focus may include queer and trans studies; feminist literatures and cultures; feminist science studies; reproductive politics; gender, labor and feminist economics, environmental and climate justice; the politics of desire, and others. Readings include a range of queer, feminist and women thinkers from around the world, reflecting diverse and interdisciplinary perspectives in the field.

WGSS 230 – Politics of Reproduction
Monday, Wednesday, Friday  10:10-11:00 a.m.
Laura Briggs
Distribution Requirement:  Sexuality Studies

From the Black Panther Party and Young Lords in the 1970s to SisterSong and Asian Communities for Reproductive Justice in the 1990s to Ferguson and Familia: Trans Queer Liberation Movement in the present, communities of color and socialist feminists have fought for a comprehensive reproductive freedom platform--birth control and abortion to be sure, but also the right to raise wanted children that are safe, cherished, and educated. The names of these issues have included freedom from sterilization, high quality affordable day care, IVF, immigrant justice, social reproduction and wages for housework, welfare and neoliberalism, foreclosure and affordable housing.  This was previously numbered under WOMENSST 295M. You may not take this course if you've previously completed WOMENSST 295M.
 

WGSS 290B – Introduction to Sexuality and Trans Studies:  Movements for Justice in the Contemporary World
Monday, Wednesday  11:15-12:05
Friday Discussion
Svati Shah
Distribution Requirement:  Sexuality Studies, Transnational Feminisms

This interdisciplinary course will help students to understand what the term "sexuality studies" means by providing a foundation in the key concepts, historical and social contexts, topics, and politics that inform the fields of sexuality studies; lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender studies; and queer studies. Course instruction will be carried out through readings, lectures, films, and discussions, as well as individual and group assignments. Over the course of the semester, students will develop and use critical thinking skills to discern how "sexuality" becomes consolidated as a distinct category of analysis in the late nineteenth century, and what it means to speak about sexuality and transgender politics and categories today. Topics will include queer theories and politics, trans theories and politics, LGBTQ social movements within and outside of the US, relationships with feminist reproductive justice movements, heterosexuality, homophobia, and HIV/AIDS and health discourses. The range of materials covered will prioritize developing analyses that examine the interplay between sexuality and class, gender, race, ethnicity, and neoliberalism.   This course was formerly titled Transnational Approaches to Queer and Sexuality Studies (Gen. Ed. SB, DG)

WGSS 290C – History of Sexuality and Race in the U.S.
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Joy Hayward-Jansen
Distribution Requirement:  Sexuality Studies, Critical Race Feminisms

This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary feminist study of sexuality. Its primary goal is to provide a forum for students to consider the history of sexuality and race in the U.S. both in terms of theoretical frameworks within women's and gender studies, and in terms of a range of sites where those theoretical approaches become material, are negotiated, or are shifted. The course is a fully interdisciplinary innovation. It will emphasize the links rather than differences between theory and practice and between cultural, material, and historical approaches to the body, gender, and sexuality. Throughout the course we will consider contemporary sexual politics "from the science of sex and sexuality to marriage debates" in light of histories of racial and sexual formations. (Gen. Ed. HS, DU)

WGSS 291E – Future of Race/Sex/Sexuality – Science Fiction
Tuesday, Thursday   11:30-12:45 p.m.
Cameron Awkward-Rich
Distribution Requirement:  Sexuality Studies, Critical Race Feminisms

This course is not a history of feminist science fiction, nor a survey of the genre. Instead, it is a course that takes seriously science fiction - and speculative work more broadly - as a site where commonsense is made strange and, therefore, can be remade. Combining reading of authors like Octavia Butler, Ursula K. LeGuin, and Torrey Peters with our own experiments in imagination, we will explore how the tools of science fiction can help us to both apprehend how race/sex/gender have historically been constituted and imagine them otherwise.

WGSS 291M – Sports, Race and Masculinity
Tuesday  6:30-9:00 p.m.|
Tom Schiff
Distribution Requirement:  Sexuality Studies, Critical Race Feminisms

In this course we will consider the relationship between sports and society with a particular focus on how sports shape cultural ideas of racialized masculinities in the United States.  Using a historical analysis, we will examine ways in which involvement in sports reflect and challenge social norms about gender, sexuality, race, and class. In addition, we will explore the interplay of athletic involvement and spectatorship across the lifespan in relation to views of masculinity. We will examine youth sports, high school and college athletics, professional sports, and amateur involvement.

WGSS 292R/692R – Sex, Love and Relationships
Monday 2:30-3:45 and Wednesday online
Angie Willey
Distribution Requirement:  Sexuality Studies

Blended online/in-person class.  Topic:  Queer Feminism and the Politics of Belonging.  This course will explore queer feminist thinking about sex, love, and relationality. We will begin by examining how these terms are used and concepts mobilized in our worlds and in scholarship. Together over the course of the semester we will consider topics such as desire, pleasure, pornography, consent, monogamy, polyamory, marriage, friendship, and community. Through our treatments of these topics we will explore questions such as: What is compulsory sexuality? What counts as sex? What is love? What sorts of hierarchies structure the relationships in our lives? What are the histories of concepts like “normal” and “healthy” and how do they shape our understandings of sex, love, and relationships? How are ideas about sex, love, and relating connected to histories of race, nation, and capital that on the surface seem unrelated to such “personal” matters? How do we narrate what our relationships mean to us and what we want from them?

WGSS 293G – Black Music and Protest
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Fumi Okiji
Distribution Requirement:  Critical Race Feminisms

We will explore 150 years of black protest music. From the ring shout and Congo Square, through blueswomen, hard bop, R&B, funk, and 90s rap, through to contemporary artists such as Janelle Monae, Kendrick and Noname, the course will consider how music has been mobilized to empower the subjugated, subvert power, and provide commentary on social injustices. Attention will be paid to the opportunities, contradictions and limitations of black performance’s potential for anti-establishment protest.

WGSS 301 – Theorizing Gender, Race, and Power
Monday, Wednesday  4:00 - 5:15 p.m.
Kiran Asher

Ways of analyzing and reflecting on current issues and controversies in feminist thought within an international context sensitive to class, race, and sexual power concerns. Topics may include work and international economic development, violence against women, racism, class and poverty, heterosexism, the social construction of gender, race and sexuality, global feminism, women, nationalism and the state, reproductive issues, pornography and media representations of women.  This course fulfills the theory requirement for majors and is offered only in the fall.  WGSS 201 is a pre-requisite for this course.

WGSS 310 – Writing for WGSS Majors
Tuesday 4:00-6:30 p.m.
TBD

Fulfills Junior Year Writing requirement for WGSS majors (offered only in the fall). Modes of writing and argumentation useful for research, creative, and professional work in a variety of fields. Analysis of texts, organization of knowledge, and uses of evidence to articulate ideas to diverse audiences. Includes materials appropriate for popular and scholarly journal writing. Popular culture reviews, responses to public arguments, monographs, first-person narratives and grant proposals, and a section on archival and bibliographic resources in Women's Studies. May include writing for the Internet. Nonmajors admitted if space available.

WGSS 391A – Rape and Representation
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Laura Ciolkowski
Distribution Requirement:  Critical Race Feminisms, Sexuality Studies

Rebecca Solnit has written, “Liberation is always in part a storytelling process: breaking stories, breaking silences, making new stories. A free person tells her own story. A valued person lives in a society in which her story has a place.”  This course approaches the study of rape and other forms of gender-based violence with particular attention to storytelling, narrative, and the politics of representation.  Our focus will be on the representation, politicization and theorization of violence through the interdisciplinary and intersectional lens of social justice feminism, gender and sexuality studies, and critical race theory.  We will explore literary, artistic, legal, and activist efforts to interpret and address violence and, ultimately, to re-imagine and re-build the world otherwise; and we will interrogate the politics of silence and speech and the act of witnessing and testimony in the long history of organizing against sexual violence by a wide variety of actors, including people of color, incarcerated people, gender non-conforming people, enslaved, and undocumented people.  Course materials will include fiction, poetry, and memoir, along with readings in law, trauma theory, carceral studies, reproductive health, rights and justice, and media studies. 

WGSS 392AA – Asian American Feminisms
Monday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Miliann Kang
Distribution Requirement:  Critical Race Feminisms

How have the figures of the Chinese bachelor, the geisha, the war bride, the hermaphrodite, the orphan, the tiger mother, the Asian nerd, the rice king, the rice queen, and the trafficked woman shaped understandings of Asian Americans, and how have these representations been critiqued by Asian American feminist scholars and writers?  Is there a body of work that constitutes "Asian American feminism(s)" and what are its distinctive contributions to the field of Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies?  How does this body of work illuminate historical and contemporary configurations of gender, sexuality, race, class, nation, citizenship, migration, empire, war, neoliberalism and globalization?  In exploring these questions, this course examines Asian American histories, bodies, identities, diasporic communities, representations, and politics through multi- and interdisciplinary approaches, including social science research, literature, popular representations, film, poetry and art.

WGSS 393D – Health, Race, Medicine:  Technologies of the Future
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Banu Subramaniam
Distribution Requirement:  Critical Race Feminisms, Sexuality Studies

In recent years, we have seen a proliferation of new medical and reproductive technologies. Who uses these technologies? Who do they impact and how? Who benefits from them? Which women? This course explores the recent controversies around personalized medicine, designer babies, human reproductive cloning situated in the long history of the struggles around equitable access to health. In particular, it explores the "genomic" revolution and its implications for women and how race and class are central to any analysis on contemporary genetics and health technologies.  The course will examine the biology and genetic reproductive technologies, new genetic technologies as well as its social, political, ethical, economic, and cultural implications.

WGSS 395F – Feminism, Comedy and Humor
Wednesday 2:30-3:45 p.m.  Monday Online
Kirsten Leng

Blended online/in-person class.  The popularity of shows like Inside Amy Schumer and Broad City and the clout of performers such as Tina Fey, Amy Poehler, and Wanda Sykes have arguably put to rest the old stereotype that women aren't funny.  More importantly, they have all shown that comedy and humor can be vehicles for feminist messages.  In so doing, they have built upon a legacy established by performers, writers, directors, and activists extending back to feminism's "first wave."  In this course, we will examine the intersections of feminism, comedy, and humor, and will explore questions such as: Why and how have feminists used humor and comedy for political ends?  Why have feminists, and women more generally, been seen as inherently unfunny?  In what ways is comedy and humor gendered?  What roles do race, class, and sexuality play?  And is humor and comedy available to all feminists, and to all feminist causes, or do the stakes and effects vary according to one’s social position and subject matter?  In addition to analyzing a wide range of media, we will create and explore our own forms of feminist comedic interventions.

WGSS 493V/693V - Human Rights and Violence Against Women in Brazil and the U.S.
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Marlise Matos

This course aims to explore the renewed centrality of gender and the language of "rights" in both Brazil and the U.S. In recent times, we have seen the mainstreaming of "gender", as gender and women's demands for inclusion on human rights has emerged as important political categories across local and national boundaries, by right-wing organizations and movements, as well in feminist responses in both contexts. The course will highlight transformations of gender and feminist politics and policies in Brazil and Latin America, as well as the United States in the last decades. How is political violation on women's human rights being mobilized in these sites? What are the ideological commitments being promoted? How is gender and feminism connected to other political movements and struggles in both countries? With the rise of the "New Right" in both national contexts, we will discuss convergences and distinctions in Latin American and US feminist responses, and the resulting possibilities of renewed forms of feminist solidarities and alliances.  The course also aims to promote debate about how (in both regions) people, feminist movements and states are facing anti-feminist policies and the growth of the political violence against women in politics (VAWP). We will also address the dissemination of sexist political violence as an attempt to regain control and to promote state discipline over the women's bodies, especially those with a political career, both in the executive and in the legislative branch of the state.

WGSS 683R/AFROAM 693R – Race, Caste and Capital
Tuesday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Svati Shah

The seminar will examine the co-constitutive historical formations of race and caste in relation to the expansion of capitalism and European high colonialism in the 18th and 19th centuries. Rather than seeing this as a period for the 'origins' of race or caste, the course will examine the ways in which race and caste were discursively mediated in the period of high colonialism to shape the kind of racialized hierarchies that we are familiar with today. The course puts the urgent concerns of African American Studies, South Asian Studies and heterodox economics, with an emphasis on questions of political economy, together in a semester-long inquiry into how racialized hierarchies have been essential to producing and maintaining class stratification and geopolitical power. We will primarily draw from the American Black Radical tradition and the South Asian Dalit Radical tradition for our readings in this course. These readings will focus on how European colonial and imperial regimes of power necessitated and furthered racialized hierarchies through regimes of chattel slavery, indentured servitude and bonded labour. We will also aim to understand how these regimes elicited some of the most radical and revolutionary struggles for liberation in the world.  While our readings will be wide ranging in scope, our discussions will focus on the fairly specific question of what relation we can postulate, based on historical evidence and historiographical critiques, between contemporary instantiations of race and caste in different parts of the world? We will necessarily pay close attention to axes of gender and sexuality throughout the seminar, drawing on examples and critical work from authors working in the Caribbean, South Asia, North America, South Africa, East Africa, and the UK.

WGSS 692A/292A - Sex, Love and Relationships
Monday 2:30-3:45 and Wednesday online
Angie Willey

Blended in-person/online classTopic:  Queer Feminism and the Politics of Belonging.  This course will explore queer feminist thinking about sex, love, and relationality. We will begin by examining how these terms are used and concepts mobilized in our worlds and in scholarship. Together over the course of the semester we will consider topics such as desire, pleasure, pornography, consent, monogamy, polyamory, marriage, friendship, and community. Through our treatments of these topics we will explore questions such as: What is compulsory sexuality? What counts as sex? What is love? What sorts of hierarchies structure the relationships in our lives? What are the histories of concepts like “normal” and “healthy” and how do they shape our understandings of sex, love, and relationships? How are ideas about sex, love, and relating connected to histories of race, nation, and capital that on the surface seem unrelated to such “personal” matters? How do we narrate what our relationships mean to us and what we want from them?

WGSS 692F – Contemporary Black Feminist Thought
Thursday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Fumi Okiji

This seminar considers contemporary Black feminist thought as a substantial critique of Western modernity, and as a source of social and epistemological alternatives. Focusing on a series of monographs published since the turn into the twenty-first century, we will sketch the current state of an undisciplined field, that coincides a thorough-going account of subjection and erasure with the founding - through thought and action - of new worlds and ways of being. Our enquiries will touch upon themes of pleasure and desire, black geographies, poetics/poethics, black iconicity, and care and affect. Alongside individual preparation and group discussion, participants will extend their skills for collaborative study.

WGSS 695A – Transnational Feminisms
Monday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Laura Briggs

How does a consideration of feminist concerns - gender, sexuality, the private, the domestic - help us interpret the current conjuncture? To get at these questions, this class will take up issues of secularism, neoliberalism, human rights, health, imperialism, epistemology, transnationalism, reproduction, and sexuality as they structure the relationship of the U.S. to the global south (particularly Latin America).

WGSS 791B – Feminist Theory
Wednesday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Kirsten Leng

This graduate seminar in feminist theory constitutes a core course for students enrolled in the Graduate Certificate in Advanced Feminist Studies. The seminar will be organized around questions that emerge for feminisms from the rubrics of gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality, transnationalism, human rights, economics and postcolonialism.  Feminist theory is inherently interdisciplinary and we will draw on classic and contemporary writings from the many fields that contribute to the "field."  Please contact Linda Hillenbrand at 545-1922 or lindah@wost.umass.edu to register for this class.  Preference is given to students admitted into the Certificate in Feminist Studies.  The theory course is only offered in the FALL semester.

 

 

Major/Minor Distribution Requirements

UMASS Critical Race Feminisms Transnational Feminisms Sexuality Studies

WGSS 230 – Politics of Reproduction

    X

WGSS 290B – Introduction to Sexuality and Trans Studies:  Movements for Justice in the Contemporary World

  X X

WGSS 291E – Future of Race/Sex/Sexuality – Science Fiction

X   X

WGSS 291M – Sports, Race and Masculinity

X   X

WGSS 292R/692R – Sex, Love and Relationships

    X

WGSS 293G – Black Music and Protest

X    

WGSS 391A – Rape and Representation

X   X

WGSS 392AA – Asian American Feminisms

X    

WGSS 393D – Health, Race, Medicine:  Technologies of the Future

X X X
WGSS 493V/693V - Human Rights and Violence Against Women in Brazil and the U.S. X X  

AFROAM 326 – Black Women in U.S. History

X    

AFROAM 330 – Songbirds, Blueswomen, Soulwomen

X    

ANTHRO 224 – Hip-Hop Cultures

X    

ANTHRO 494BI – Global Bodies

    X

CHINESE 394WI – Women in Chinese Cultures

  X  

HISTORY 364/POLISCI 364 – Gender and Race in U.S. Social Policy History

X    

HISTORY 397RL – Rape Law:  Gender, Race, (In)justice

    X

POLISCI 364/HISTORY 364 – Gender and Race in U.S. Social Policy History

X    

POLISCI 397BZ – Race and Gender Politics in the Americas:  Brazil in Comparative Perspective

  X  
PUBHLTH 340 - LGBTQ Health     X

PSYCH 391ZZ – Psychology of the Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Experience

    X
Continuing and Professional Education (CPE) Critical Race Feminisms Transnational Feminisms Sexuality Studies

WGSS 205 – Feminist Health Politics

    X

WGSS 291R – Gender, Race and Family

X    

WGSS 292M – Sex, Race and Medicine

X X X

WGSS 297R – Sex, Race and Cinema

X   X

PSYCH 391GB – LGBTQ+ Issues in Psychology

    X
AMHERST COLLEGE Critical Race Feminisms Transnational Feminisms Sexuality Studies

SWAG 207/ASLC 207/POSC 207 – The Home and the World: Women and Gender in South Asia

  X  

SWAG 210/ANTH 210 – Anthropology of Sexuality

    X

SWAG 243/AMST 240 – Rethinking Pocahontas: An Introduction to Native American and Indigenous Studies

X    

SWAG 294/BLST 294/EUST 294 – Black Europe

  X  

SWAG 303/ANTH 300/SOCI 300 – On Display: Race and Reproduction in Film and Media

X   X

SWAG 328 – Science and Sexuality

    X

SWAG 337/BLST 337 – Angela Davis

X    

SWAG 345/HIST 345/LLAS 345 – Gender and Sexuality in Latin America

  X  

SWAG 347/BLST 347 – Race, Sex, and Gender in the U.S. Military

X    

SWAG 411/POSC 411 – Indigenous Women and World Politics

  X  

SWAG 436/HIST 436 – Race, Gender, and Sexuality in U.S. History

X   X
HAMPSHIRE COLLEGE Critical Race Feminisms Transnational Feminisms Sexuality Studies

CSI 222 – Race and the Queer Politics of the Prison States

X   X

CSI 227 – Young Revolutionaries:  Race, Gender, and Narratives of Emerging Political Consciousness

X    

CSI 285 – Histories and Theories of Racial Capitalism

X    

HACU 306 – Feminist and Queer Theory Across the Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences

    X

IA 244 – Love, Gender and Sexuality in Contemporary African Societies

X    
MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE Critical Race Feminisms Transnational Feminisms Sexuality Studies

GNDST 204CW/ASIAN 215/THEAT 234 – Androgyny and Gender Negotiation in Contemporary Chinese Women’s Theater

  X  

GNDST 204ET/ENGL 232 – Rovers, Cuckqueens, and Country Wives of All Kinds:  The Queer Eighteenth Century

    X

GNDST 210SL/RELIG 207 – Women and Gender in Islam

  X  

GNDST 221QF – Feminist & Queer Theory

    X

GNDST 241/ANTHR 216HP – Feminist Health Politics

    X

GNDST 333EG/ANTHR 316 EG – Eggs and Embryos:  Innovations in Reproductive and Genetic Technologies

    X

GNDST 333FM/LATST 350FM/CST 349FM – Latina Feminism(s)

X    

GNDST 333TM/ENGL 350TM/AFCNA 341TM – Toni Morrison

X    

POLIT 255A – The Politics of Abortion in the Americas

    X
SMITH COLLEGE Critical Race Feminisms Transnational Feminisms Sexuality Studies

SWG 228 – Theorizing Queer Feminism

    X

SWG 233 – Gender and Sexuality in Asian America

X    

SWG 241 – White Supremacy in the Age of Trump

X    

SWG 305 – Queer Histories & Cultures

    X

AFR 202 – The Black Archive

X    

AFR 249 – Black Women Writers

X    

AFR 360/ENG 323 – Toni Morrison

X    

ANT 250 – The Anthropology of Reproduction

    X

HST 263 – Women and Gender in Latin America

  X  

REL 277 – South Asian Masculinities

  X X

SOC 236 – Beyond Borders: The New Global Political Economy

  X  

SOC 327 – Global Migration in the 21st Century

  X  

AFROAM 326 – Black Women in U.S. History
Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Traci Parker

The history of African American women from the experience of slavery to the present. Emphasis on the effect of racist institutions and practices on women. The ways in which women organized themselves to address the needs of African Americans in general and their own in particular. The achievements of such leaders as Mary Church Terrell, Harriet Tubman, Ella Baker, and Mary McLeod Bethune as well as lesser known women.  (Gen.Ed. HS, DU)

 

AFROAM 330 – Songbirds, Blueswomen, Soulwomen
Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Traci Parker

The focus for this course is the cultural, political, and social issues found in the music and history of African American women performers. The primary emphasis in the course will be on African American women in Jazz, Blues, and Soul/R&B, but students also will study African American women composers as well as Spiritual-Gospel and Opera performers.

 

ANTHRO 224 – Hip-Hop Cultures
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Whitney Battle-Baptiste

This course will critically examine issues of race, representation and the sexual politics of hip-hop culture. We will trace the historical implications of race and gender in U. S. culture from slavery onwards and connect how past images of African Americans continue to influence contemporary notions of Black identity. We will trace the early historical moments of the hip-hop movement in order to understand how the culture became synonymous with male dominated spaces and silent women. This course will also explore the role of misogyny, sexual exploitation, and hyper-masculinity in current rap music and contrast this with the rise of independent artists challenging and reshaping hip-hop music today. Ultimately, we will look at the role of the internet and alternative forms of media as a means of how hip-hop has moved from the boardroom to the global stage, giving the power back to the people.

 

ANTHRO 494BI – Global Bodies
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Elizabeth Krause

The human body has increasingly become an object of anthropological study. The body is rich as a site of meaning and materiality. Similarly, culture inscribes itself on the body in terms of ‘normalization’ and governance. This course will explore pertinent issues surrounding the body today. Topics such as personhood, natural vs. artificial bodies, identity and subjectivity (nationality, race, class, sex, gender), domination and marginalization, and policy will be discussed. We will focus on the body in three main stages: birth, life, and death, with relevant case studies in each stage (e.g., embryos, reproduction, breastfeeding, organs, immigrant bodies, etc.) The course has a digital ethnography component as a final project option. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Anth majors.

 

CHINESE 394WI – Women in Chinese Cultures
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Elena Chiu

This course focuses on the representation of women and the constitution of gender in Chinese culture as seen through literature and mass media. It focuses on literary and visual representations of women to examine important issues such as the relationship between gender and power, self and society, and tradition and modernity. This course has a dual goal: to explore how women's social role has evolved from pre-modern China to the present and to examine important issues such as women's agency, "inner-outer" division, and the yin-yang dichotomy in Chinese literature and culture. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Chinse majors.

 

CLASSICS 335 – Women in Antiquity
Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Teresa Ramsby

Lives, roles, contributions, and status of women in Greek and Roman societies, as reflected in classical literature and the archaeological record.  (Gen.Ed. HS)

 

ECON 348 – The Political Economy of Women
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Lisa Saunders

A critical review of neoclassical, Marxist, and feminist economic theories pertaining to inequality between men and women in both the family and the firm.

 

ENGLISH 132 – Gender, Sexuality, Literature, and Culture
Monday, Wednesday, Friday  11:15-12:05 p.m.
Monday, Wednesday, Friday  12:20-1:10 p.m.
Monday, Wednesday, Friday  10:10-11:00 a.m.

Literature treating the relationship between man and woman. Topics may include: the nature of love, the image of the hero and heroine, and definitions, past and present, of the masculine and feminine.  (Gen.Ed. AL, DG)

 

ENGLISH 378 – American Women Writers
Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Sarah Patterson

Fiction by women exploring the social and sexual arrangements of American culture.

 

GERMAN 363 – Witches:  Myth and Reality
Monday, Wednesday, Friday  12:20-1:10 p.m.
TBD

This course focuses on various aspects of witches/witchcraft in order to examine the historical construction of the witch in the context of the social realities of women (and men) labeled as witches.  The main areas covered are:  European pagan religions and the spread of Christianity; the "Burning Times" in early modern Europe, with an emphasis on the German situation; 17th-century New England and the Salem witch trials; the images of witches in folk lore and fairy tales in the context of the historical persecutions; and contemporary Wiccan/witch practices in their historical context.  The goal of the course is to deconstruct the stereotypes that many of us have about witches/witchcraft, especially concerning sexuality, gender, age, physical appearance, occult powers, and Satanism.  Readings are drawn from documentary records of the witch persecutions and witch trials, literary representations, scholarly analyses of witch-related phenomena, and essays examining witches, witchcraft, and the witch persecutions from a contemporary feminist or neo-pagan perspective.  The lectures will be supplemented by related material taken from current events in addition to visual material (videos, slides) drawn from art history, early modern witch literature, popular culture, and documentary sources.  Conducted in English.  (Gen Ed. I)

 

HISTORY 364/POLISCI 364 – Gender and Race in U.S. Social Policy History
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Elizabeth Sharrow

What are the problems associated with developing equitable and just policy?  Why does social policy in the United States continue to be marked by tensions between the principle of equality and the reality of inequalities in social, political, and economic realms?  How might policy subvert or reinforce these differences and inequalities?  This class examines the history of social policy in the United States, particularly those policies affecting concerns of gender, race, and class.  We will examine a wide range of social policies, focusing on those affecting groups such as: women, racial and ethnic minorities, LGBT people, and low-income people.  We will study primarily empirical work, while asking questions about how political culture, interest groups, social movements, government institutions and other factor influence U.S. social policy.

 

HISTORY 389 – U.S. Women’s History Since 1890
Tuesday, Thursday  5:30-6:45 p.m.
Laura Lovett

Explores the relationship of women to the social, cultural, economic and political developments shaping American society from 1890 to the present. Examines women's paid and unpaid labor, family life and sexuality, feminist movements and women's consciousness; emphasis on how class, race, ethnicity, and sexual choice have affected women's historical experience. Sophomore level and above.  (Gen.Ed. HS, DU)

 

HISTORY 397RL – Rape Law:  Gender, Race, (In)justice
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Jennifer Nye

The history of the legal response to rape has often resulted in injustice for both the victim/survivor and the alleged perpetrator.  This course will examine the evolution of the U.S. legal system's treatment of rape, paying particular attention to the movement against lynching in the post-civil war era, the rise of the feminist anti-rape movement in the 1970s and the student movement against campus sexual assault.  Through an analysis of court cases, legislation, and other texts we will consider the role sexual violence has played in maintaining gender and racialized power relationships.  We will examine how and why such violence came to be seen as a crime, including who is worthy of the law's "protection" and who is subject to the law's ‘punishment.’ We will explore issues such as:  rape as a form of racialized and imperial violence, especially against black and Native American women; the criminal legal treatment of rape and the evolution of the legal concepts of force, resistance, and consent; and the civil responses to rape under the Violence Against Women Act and Title IX.  We'll also look at the international law responses to rape as a weapon of war.  Finally, we'll think about how the legal responses, or non-responses, to rape have differed over time depending on factors such as the race/ethnicity, income level, immigration status, sexual orientation/gender identity, age, and marital status of the victim/survivor and the perpetrator.  Finally, we’ll consider how the legal system can or should respond to rape, particularly in this age of mass criminalization and mass incarceration, and whether restorative justice responses might be preferable.  Prior law-related coursework is helpful, but not required.

 

HISTORY 397LW – Women and the Law
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Jennifer Nye

This course examines the legal status of women in the United States, focusing specifically on the 20th and 21st centuries. How has the law used gender, sex, sexuality, and race to legally enforce inequality between women and men (and among women)?  We will examine the legal arguments feminists have used to advocate for legal change and how these arguments have changed over time, paying specific attention to debates about whether to make legal arguments based on formal equality, substantive equality, liberty, or privacy. We will also consider the pros and cons of using the law to advocate for social justice. Specific issues that may be covered include the civil and political participation of women (voting, jury service), employment discrimination, intimate relationships, reproduction, contraception and abortion, violence against women, women as criminal defendants, and women as law students, lawyers, and judges.

 

POLISCI 364/HISTORY 364 – Gender and Race in U.S. Social Policy History
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Elizabeth Sharrow

What are the problems associated with developing equitable and just policy?  Why does social policy in the United States continue to be marked by tensions between the principle of equality and the reality of inequalities in social, political, and economic realms?  How might policy subvert or reinforce these differences and inequalities?  This class examines the history of social policy in the United States, particularly those policies affecting concerns of gender, race, and class.  We will examine a wide range of social policies, focusing on those affecting groups such as: women, racial and ethnic minorities, LGBT people, and low-income people.  We will study primarily empirical work, while asking questions about how political culture, interest groups, social movements, government institutions and other factor influence U.S. social policy.

 

POLISCI 395F – Women and Politics
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Maryann Barakso

Women have made tremendous gains in every aspect of social, economic and political life in the United States, particularly since the second wave of the women's movement in the 1960s.  Yet, women's progress in terms of achieving elected office has reached a puzzling plateau since the 1990s.  We will examine the course of women's movements towards achieving political incorporation in the United States. We consider the debate over why women's political progress has stagnated and we consider the impact of the gender imbalance in American electoral politics - to what extent do these disparities matter?  We begin by exploring women's suffrage campaigns and voting behavior in the period immediately following their achievement of the right to vote and beyond. We then turn to the relationship between women and party politics before discussing the challenges women face as candidates in American politics. We will focus on understanding why women remain underrepresented as legislators. We then consider the extent to which women's participation in campaigns and elections makes a substantive difference in policy-making.

 

POLISCI 397BZ – Race and Gender Politics in the Americas:  Brazil in Comparative Perspective
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Sonia Alvarez

Race and gender politics are deeply imbricated, constituting core dimensions of power, political subjectivities, and resistant identities. Race intersects with gender, along other vectors of power, determining individuals’ and communities’ rights, livelihoods, and life chances, restricting their access to cultural, political, monetary, and libidinal/sexual capital, and buttressing or undermining shifting strategies of domination and resistance. By considering the case of Brazil - which is quintessentially raced, gendered and sexualized in both the popular and scholarly imaginations (think soccer, carnival, racialized sex tourism, eroticized "mulatas," etc.) - in comparison to other racial-gender-sexual formations in the Americas, this seminar will explore the historical, political, and cultural construction of gender and race, with particular emphasis on the experiences of Afro-descendant women. We will assess comparatively how hegemonic race and gender discourses and policies come into being and how they are challenged by anti-racist and Black feminist and queer/trans activism, both nationally and internationally. An on-going concern of the seminar will be to theorize the ways that race and gender play into current ultra-Right politics in Brazil as well as elsewhere in the Americas region and the world.

 

POLISCI 397GC – Gender, Conflict, and Security
Monday, Wednesday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
Meredith Loken

This course investigates the gendered dimensions of armed conflict, foreign policy, international governance, peace-building, and post-conflict insecurities. Students will engage with academic and policy debates about how gendered power distributions shape international and human security. We will explore the issues raised in these debates by considering historical and contemporary global cases, including the role of masculinity in foreign policy, women's participation in political violence, gender-based civilian targeting, international post-conflict courts and transitional justice.

 

PUBHLTH 328 – Fundamentals of Women’s Health
Thursday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Sara Sabelawski

This course will provide a comprehensive overview of issues related to health in women, addressing areas including but not limited to biology, psychology, geography, economics, health policy, and social issues.

 

PUBHLTH 340 - LGBTQ Health
Monday, Wednesday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
Kelsey Jordan

This course is about the unique health needs and health disparities within the LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer) communities, and among the individuals who make up each of these communities. We will learn about gender identity and sexual orientation development in kids and young adults, sexual health, global perspectives, strategies for improving the healthcare experience of LGBT people (e.g., patient-centered and compassionate care), barriers to accessing health care, and many other relevant topics. This is an important course for public health students, because it teaches more than just the facts, but also skills for creating a compassionate and inclusive environment for vulnerable populations. (Gen. Ed. SB, DU)  Open to Public Majors only.  

 

PSYCH 391ZZ – Psychology of the Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Experience
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
John Bickford

Students in this course will explore psychological theory and research pertaining to gay, lesbian, and bisexual people. Topics include sexual orientation, sexual identity development, stigma management, heterosexism & homonegativity, gender roles, same-sex relationships, LGB families, LGB diversity, and LGB mental health.

 

STPEC 491H – Race, Caste and Capital
Monday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Svati Shah

The seminar will examine the co-constitutive historical formations of race and caste in relation to the expansion of capitalism and European high colonialism in the 18th and 19th centuries. Rather than seeing this as a period for the 'origins' of race or caste, the course will examine the ways in which race and caste were discursively mediated in the period of high colonialism to shape the kind of racialized hierarchies that we are familiar with today. The course puts the urgent concerns of African American Studies, South Asian Studies and heterodox economics, with an emphasis on questions of political economy, together in a semester-long inquiry into how racialized hierarchies have been essential to producing and maintaining class stratification and geopolitical power. We will primarily draw from the American Black Radical tradition and the South Asian Dalit Radical tradition for our readings in this course. These readings will focus on how European colonial and imperial regimes of power necessitated and furthered racialized hierarchies through regimes of chattel slavery, indentured servitude and bonded labour. We will also aim to understand how these regimes elicited some of the most radical and revolutionary struggles for liberation in the world. While our readings will be wide ranging in scope, our discussions will focus on the fairly specific question of what relation we can postulate, based on historical evidence and historiographical critiques, between contemporary instantiations of race and caste in different parts of the world. We will necessarily pay close attention to axes of gender and sexuality throughout the seminar, drawing on examples and critical work from authors working in the Caribbean, South Asia, North America, South Africa, East Africa, and the UK.

 

SOCIOL 106 – Race, Gender, Class & Ethnicity
(RAP) Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m. - Kelly Giles
Monday, Wednesday  4:00-5:15 p.m. – C.N. Le

Introduction to Sociology.  Analysis of the consequences of membership in racial, gender, class and ethnic groups on social, economic and political life.   
(Gen.Ed. SB, DU)

 

SOCIOL 283 – Gender and Society
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
TBD

Analysis of: 1) historical and cross-cultural variation in positions and relationships of women and men; 2) contemporary creation and internalization of gender and maintenance of gender differences in adult life; 3) recent social movements to transform or maintain "traditional" positions of women and men.

 

SOCIOL 344 – Gender and Crime
Monday, Wednesday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
TBD

The extent and causes of gender differences in crime, from the "streets" to the "suites." Topics include problems in the general measurement of crime, historical and cross-cultural differences in the gender gap, the utility of general theories of the causes of crime in explaining the continuing gender gap, and a detailed look at the question and magnitude of gender discrimination in the American criminal justice system.

 

SOCIOL 388 – Gender & Globalization
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Millicent Thayer

Examines how globalization impacts gender relations, as well as how beliefs about  femininity and masculinity influence globalization. Focuses on particularly important contexts, including: global production, international debt, migration, sex, tourism and war.

 

SOCIOL 397ED – Sociology of Eating Disorders
Monday, Wednesday, Friday  12:20-1:10 p.m.
Veronica Everett

This course is designed to look at eating disorders through the lens of Sociology. We will be discussing relevant topics such as social narratives around body image and media (including social media), gender norms, race, feminism, socioeconomic influences related to weight, the history of some of these variables and how they've evolved over time. We will also look at issues related to development and mental health including self-esteem, peer relationships, family systems/environment, mood disorders, trauma, diagnoses, healthcare policy and treatment. Lastly, as its relevant to you as students, we will look at college life and eating disorders as it is often a time when eating disorders develop or peak.

 

ANTHRO 344 – Italy:  Facism to Fashion
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Elizabeth Krause

 

This course complements the Department of Anthropology’s strength in the anthropology of Europe. This course uses Italy as a case study to investigate four key themes: 1) the state, civil society, and hegemony; 2) kinship, gender, and reproduction; 3) culture and economy; and 4) immigration and globalization. Throughout, we will consider symbolic as well as materialist approaches to grasping experiences of everyday life as they play out in one of Europe’s southern territories. (Gen. Ed. SB)

 

ANTHRO 394AI – Europe After the Wall
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Julie Hemment

 

The fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 was a seismic event that took the world by storm. It gave rise to dizzy optimism and hope for a new, post-ideological age and greater global unity, within and beyond Europe. Twenty years on, these hopes have not been realized. Cold War hostilities are alive and well and although the EU has expanded, Europe is, arguably, more divided than ever. This course explores the implications of the Wall and its passing for Europe, focusing on anthropological accounts of the (former) East bloc. The course is divided into three main parts: Europe behind the Iron Curtain (the cultural logics of state socialism); What Came Next? (the fall of the wall, international interventions to `democratize’ post-socialist space); and a section that explores the post-socialist present. During this last bloc, we will explore themes of gender and generation, nostalgia and the politics of history, and the return of the state. As we go, we’ll be reading some of the most exciting new ethnographies of the region, grounded accounts that explore the transformations in social and cultural logics, power relations and practices that accompanied political and economic change. Through a mixture of group work, collaboratively designed projects and reflection papers, assignments are specifically tailored to enable you to bring the threads of your Gen Ed experience together as you consider the specific topics of the Cold War, state socialism and the global implications of its passing.  Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Anth majors.

 

ASIAN 397B – Bridging Asia and Asian American Generations
Wednesday  6:00-8:00 p.m.
C.N. Le

 

Talks by local and visiting faculty, as well as film screenings and performances, designed to introduce students to the multi-layered connections between Asia and Asian America.  Areas that will be considered include: popular culture, youth subcultures, labor, issues of gender and sexuality, and migration and immigrant communities.  Discussions emphasize how issues play out at local, national and transnational levels.

 

COMM 271 – Humor in Society
Monday, Wednesday  1:25-2:15 p.m. with Friday discussions
Stephen Olbrys Gencarella

 

This course examines humor as a significant form of creative expression in social and political life. In recent decades, scholars of all persuasions from the humanities, social sciences, and even hard sciences have examined this subject through a critical lens, leading to the development of an interdisciplinary field known as humor studies. This course provides an introduction to that burgeoning field. Topics will include different theories of humor, the relationship between humor and play, the differences between humor and comedy, the use of humor in the redress of political and social tensions, the importance of the body in humor, and the role of humor in maintaining identity, especially in the negotiation of race, gender, class, ethnicity, religion, and sexual orientation. (Gen Ed SB)

 

COMM 297FA – Spirit and Stories:  The Folklore of Alcohol
Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Stephen Olbrys Gencarella

 

This course examines the vast store of folklore inspired by and directed at alcohol and its cultural reach. Folklore means traditional expressive practices ranging from the verbal arts (such as stories and songs) to material culture (such as crafts and medicine) to customary activities (such as rituals and beliefs). The range of folklore herein is both global and ancient; that is, it concerns the entire history of alcohol, which in effect necessitates attention to the entire history of humanity in a global perspective. Specific lectures will address cultural differences concerning alcohol in the negotiation of race, ethnicity, class, nationhood, religion, gender, and political identity.

 

COMM 394EI – Performance and the Politics of Race
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Kimberlee Perez

 

This course looks at the ways race, racial identities, and interracial relations are formed through and by communication practices in present-day U.S. America. Though focusing on U.S. America in the current historical moment, the course takes into account the ways history as well as the transnational flows of people and capital inform and define conversations about race and racial identities. Race will be discussed as intersectional, taking into account the ways race is understood and performed in relation to gender, sexuality, class, and nation. The course will focus on the performance and communications of race, ranging from everyday interactions, personal narratives and storytelling, intra- and inter-racial dialogue, and staged performances.

 

COMP-LIT 231 – Comedy
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
TBD

 

Our course begins with the premise that contemporary American comedy is informed by the histories of ethnic American groups -- African Americans, Native Americans, Asian Americans and U.S. Latinos/Latinas -- along with issues of race, class, sexuality and citizenship. American comedians, independent filmmakers, feminists and transgendered comics deploy the language of comedy to invoke serious social matters in contemporary American life: racism, heterosexism, homophobia, class biases against the poor and the undocumented, misogyny, war and other burning issues of the day. We will thus consider that the ends of comedy are more than laughter. Comedy confronts political issues that are constitutive of and threatening to the U.S. body politic. (Gen Ed AL)

 

ENGLISH 279 – Intro to American Studies
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Laura Furlan

 

Interdisciplinary approach to the study of American culture. Focus on issues of race, class, gender, and ethnicity. Readings drawn from literature, history, the social sciences, philosophy and fine arts. Supplemented with audio-visual materials, films, slides of paintings, architecture, photography and material culture, and music. Required for students with a concentration in American Studies. (Gen. Ed. AL, DU)

 

ENGLISH 349 – Nineteenth Century British Fiction
Tuesday, Thursday  5:30-6:45 p.m.
Suzanne Daly

 

A survey of novels written in the British Isles between 1789 and 1901, with emphasis on historical context, form and genre, and themes including industry and empire, gender and class, and religion and science.

 

FRENCHST 280 – Love and Sex in French Culture
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Patrick Mensah

 

Course taught in English.  This course offers a broad historical overview of the ways in which love and erotic behavior in French culture have been represented and understood in the arts, especially in Literature and, more recently, in film, from the middle ages to the twentieth century. (Gen.Ed. AL)

 

GERMAN 270 – From the Grimms to Disney
Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Sara Jackson

 

This course focuses on selected fairy tales of the Brothers Grimm (Hansel & Gretel, Snow White, Sleeping Beauty, Cinderella, Iron Hans) and Hans Christian Andersen (Little Sea Maid, The Red Shoes), locating them in the 19th-century German or Danish culture of their origins and then examining how they became transformed into perennial favorites of U.S. popular culture through their adaptations by Disney (feature animation films), Broadway (musicals), or bestselling self-help books (Iron John, Women Who Run With the Wolves).  As a point of comparison, this course will also introduce popular fairy-tale films of the former East Germany (GDR) from the UMass DEFA archives & library, which present the same stories as popular fare in a Cold War communinist cultural context.  Conducted in English.  (Gen. Ed. AL).

 

HISTORY 264 – History of Health Care and Medicine in the U.S.
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-10:50 a.m., Discussions Friday
Emily Redman

 

This course explores the history and social meaning of medicine, medical practice, health care, and disease in the United States from 1600 to the present. Using a variety of sources aimed at diverse audiences students will investigate topics such as: the evolution of beliefs about the body; medical and social responses to infectious and chronic disease; the rise of medical science and medical organizations; the development of medical technologies; mental health diagnosis and treatment; changing conceptions of the body; the training, role, and image of medical practitioners and the role of public and government institutions in promoting health practices and disease treatments. We will pay particular attention to the human experience of medicine, with readings on the experience of being ill, the delivery of compassionate care, and the nature of the relationship between practitioners and patients. Course themes will include race, gender, cultural diversity, women and gender, social movements, science, technology, politics, industry, and ethics. (Gen. Ed. HS, DU)

 

JUDAIC 344/MIDEAST 344 – Film and Society in Israel
Tuesday  4:00-6:45 p.m.
Olga Gershenson

 

This course uses film to discuss Israeli society.  Topics include: foundation of Israel, Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Holocaust survivors, religion, gender, and interethnic relations.  All film showings are with English subtitles. (Gen. Ed. AT, DG)

 

LABOR 297S/SOCIOL 297S – Sports, Labor, and Social Justice
Tuesday, Thursday  4:0-5:15 p.m.
Jerrold Levinsky

 

Protests by professional and amateur athletes against racial and gender discrimination are not new or isolated events in U.S. history. In fact, sports have long been connected to the social, economic, and political issues of the day. With a particular focus on labor and civil rights struggle, our goal is to better understand the history of sports as it relates to social class, race, and gender. Students will analyze current controversies through this critical approach to sports and society.

 

PUBHLTH 389 – Health Inequities
Monday, Wednesday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
Luis Valdez

 

While the health and wellbeing of the nation has improved overall, racial, ethnic, gender and sexuality disparities in morbidity and mortality persist. To successfully address growing disparities, it is important to understand social determinants of health and translate current knowledge into specific strategies to undo health inequalities. This course will explore social justice as a philosophical underpinning of public health and will consider the etiology of disease rooted in social conditions. It aims to strengthen critical thinking, self-discovery, and knowledge of ways in which socioeconomic, political, and cultural systems structure health outcomes. (Gen. Ed. SB, DU)

 

STPEC 189 – Introduction to Radical Social Theory
Wednesday  4:00-6:00 p.m.
Graciela Monteagudo

 

This is an introductory course to radical social theory. Our focus is the history of social thought in the West, and the postcolonial critiques of some of these ideas. In this course, students will learn that "radical" means "at the root," and radical social theory is theory that explains the roots of social inequalities and proposes ways of transforming society to achieve justice. As a General Education course, our goal is for students to have the opportunity to discuss key societal issues through a variety of disciplines, including philosophy, anthropology, history, economy, African-American, Native American and gender and sexuality studies. Through analysis of readings and films, we will explore the connection between cultural processes and power in the West and the implications for non-Western people on a global scale and on different times and places.  (GenEd HS, DG)

 

STPEC 320 – Writing for Critical Consciousness
Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Shakuntala Ray

 

The STPEC Junior Writing Seminar focuses on individual development of voice. We will weave this theme through standard essay assignments, weekly response papers, cover letters and resumes, and a student-driven class project of your choosing. Since you and your classmates with be struggling together to find your voices, we’ll focus on peer-editing and tutoring techniques at the beginning of the semester. As we discuss peer-editing, we may consider issues of language and dialect, Standard Written English and feminism. The second half of the semester will focus on political, environmental, educational, cultural, and philosophical texts.  Throughout all assignments I expect to see cultivation of your voice and communication of your own creative ideas. I encourage integration of ideas from your other courses and experiences. Be prepared to think critically and examine texts carefully. We will be sharing our writing with each other – be ready to give and receive constructive feedback. This course meets only once a week; do not plan to miss any classes.

 

STPEC 391H – Core Seminar I
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Graciela Monteagudo

 

STPEC Core Seminar I focuses on major theoretical currents in political theory and the historical circumstances that gave rise to those theories-in particular Liberalism, Marxism, Anarchism, Postcolonial, and Poststructural theories. As this is an interdisciplinary class, we will be bringing in analytic tools from various disciplines paying attention to the historical construction and reception of ideas.

 

STPEC 392H – Core Seminar II
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Shemon Salam

 

STPEC Core Seminar II focuses on the development of social struggles, political economy, and theory from the 1960s to the present. Continuing our analysis of racial capitalism and empire, Core II will explore how these formations changed due to economic crisis, national liberation, and class struggle. We will research the connections between race, class, gender, sexuality, and other axes of oppression under neoliberalism. A major research paper of the student's choosing will be produced over the course of the semester allowing students to more deeply engage with a topic, and to practice applying the critical methodological and theoretical tools developed in the STPEC curriculum.

 

SOCIOL 248 – Conformity and Deviance
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
TBD

 

This course examines the social processes of rule-making and rule-breaking, and how categories of "normal" and "deviance" change historically. We examine different theories of conformity and deviance, using topics such as sexuality and politics.

 

SOCIOL 330 – Asian Americans and Inequalities
Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Moon-Kie Jung

 

At least since the 1960s, sociology and the other social sciences have largely sidestepped questions of inequality in relation to Asian Americans, simplistically and indiscriminately positing them as a "model minority." This course examines various forms of social inequality between Asian Americans and other groups as well as among Asian Americans, including those based on race, gender, class, citizenship, and sexuality.

 

SOCIOL 397CT – Introduction to Caribbean Thought
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 p.m.
Sancha Medwinter

 

This course traces the origin and course of postcolonial intellectual and political projects of Afro-Caribbean thinkers and activists that crosscut themes of racism, classism, and sexism. The course surveys shifting socio-historical contexts and the accompanying theoretical and epistemological shifts that give rise to Critical Realism, Black Consciousness, Black Radical Thought, Black Marxism, and Caribbean Feminisms. Students in this seminar will be encouraged to think comparatively, continually drawing linkages between the dynamic intellectual and political projects unfolding in the Caribbean and the historical and contemporary developments in scholarships and struggles in the U.S. and the Global South.

 

SOCIOL 397J – Sociology of Aspirations
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Ofer Sharone

 

What do I really want to do when I grow up? is a new course examining the role of social forces in shaping our hopes and dreams.  In this course students will have a chance to reflect on their own life goals and aspirations, as well as those of others, and consider the role of gender, economic class, race, and culture in shaping these.  For example, in this course we consider how social forces like gender and economic class may influence our career goals and the kind of relationships and family life we seek to create.  Beyond our individual lives the class will also consider how social forces may shape our visions for an ideal society and the kinds of societal changes we may wish to help bring about.

 

SPANISH 324 – Introduction to Latino/a Literature
Monday, Wednesday, Friday  9:05 – 9:55 a.m.
TBD

 

In this course students will think critically about the various "wild tongues" that have defined U.S. Latinx literature and culture in the 20th and 21st centuries. Our analysis will center on issues of power as they are experienced by diverse U.S. Latinx populations. Specifically, we will focus on Latinx writers, performers, and scholars that push the boundaries of acceptable gender, sexuality, and racialization within U.S. Latinx cultures, focusing specifically on Caribbean and Chicanx populations in the United States. Students will be required to engage critically with primary texts, as well as reflect on the ways in which these issues exist in the world around us. Because Latinx thinkers often blur the boundaries of traditional literary and scholarly genres, we will consider pinnacle works of Latinx studies - such as those of Pedro Pietri, Gloria Anzaldua, and Junot Diaz - alongside other forms of cultural production, such as performance art and film. We will also try our hands at these art forms in an effort to find new, embodied ways to interact with expressions of Latinx culture. Course texts are written in both English and Spanish. Class discussion will take place in Spanish. All assignments must be completed in Spanish. (Gen. Ed. AL, DU)

 

THEATER 329 – Contemporary Native American Performance
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Priscilla Page

 

Contemporary Native American Performance is an area of study with deep roots in culturally specific production and an ever-evolving practice by a wide range of artists. In this Junior Year Writing course we will read plays and performative texts created by Native American artists since the 1960's. We will begin our study by acknowledging the limitations of language and the always contentious issue of labels. Within this critical framework, we will study the art as well as the attending social, political, and historical contexts. We will examine innovations and experimentation with artistic form and study each artist’s use of language, style and thematic content. Imperative topics of discussion will include gender roles, expressions of sexuality, class position, and cultural identity as articulated by the artists we study.  Theater is an interactive, living art form. With this in mind we will attend relevant performances and generate in-class performances.

WGSS 791B – Feminist Theory
Wednesday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Kirsten Leng

This graduate seminar in feminist theory constitutes a core course for students enrolled in the Graduate Certificate in Feminist Studies. The seminar will be organized around questions that emerge for feminisms from the rubrics of gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality, transnationalism, human rights, economics and post-colonialism.  Feminist theory is inherently interdisciplinary and we will draw on classic and contemporary writings from the many fields that contribute to the "field."  Please contact Linda Hillenbrand at 545-1922 or lindah@wost.umass.edu to register for this class.  Preference is given to students admitted into the Certificate in Advanced Feminist Studies.  The theory course is only offered the FALL semester.

 

 

WGSS 683R/AFROAM 693R – Race, Caste and Capital
Tuesday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Svati Shah

The seminar will examine the co-constitutive historical formations of race and caste in relation to the expansion of capitalism and European high colonialism in the 18th and 19th centuries. Rather than seeing this as a period for the 'origins' of race or caste, the course will examine the ways in which race and caste were discursively mediated in the period of high colonialism to shape the kind of racialized hierarchies that we are familiar with today. The course puts the urgent concerns of African American Studies, South Asian Studies and heterodox economics, with an emphasis on questions of political economy, together in a semester-long inquiry into how racialized hierarchies have been essential to producing and maintaining class stratification and geopolitical power. We will primarily draw from the American Black Radical tradition and the South Asian Dalit Radical tradition for our readings in this course. These readings will focus on how European colonial and imperial regimes of power necessitated and furthered racialized hierarchies through regimes of chattel slavery, indentured servitude and bonded labour. We will also aim to understand how these regimes elicited some of the most radical and revolutionary struggles for liberation in the world.  While our readings will be wide ranging in scope, our discussions will focus on the fairly specific question of what relation we can postulate, based on historical evidence and historiographical critiques, between contemporary instantiations of race and caste in different parts of the world? We will necessarily pay close attention to axes of gender and sexuality throughout the seminar, drawing on examples and critical work from authors working in the Caribbean, South Asia, North America, South Africa, East Africa, and the UK.

 

WGSS 493V/693V - Human Rights and Violence Against Women in Brazil and the U.S.
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Marlise Matos

This course aims to explore the renewed centrality of gender and the language of "rights" in both Brazil and the U.S. In recent times, we have seen the mainstreaming of "gender", as gender and women's demands for inclusion on human rights has emerged as important political categories across local and national boundaries, by right-wing organizations and movements, as well in feminist responses in both contexts. The course will highlight transformations of gender and feminist politics and policies in Brazil and Latin America, as well as the United States in the last decades. How is political violation on women's human rights being mobilized in these sites? What are the ideological commitments being promoted? How is gender and feminism connected to other political movements and struggles in both countries? With the rise of the "New Right" in both national contexts, we will discuss convergences and distinctions in Latin American and US feminist responses, and the resulting possibilities of renewed forms of feminist solidarities and alliances.  The course also aims to promote debate about how (in both regions) people, feminist movements and states are facing anti-feminist policies and the growth of the political violence against women in politics (VAWP). We will also address the dissemination of sexist political violence as an attempt to regain control and to promote state discipline over the women's bodies, especially those with a political career, both in the executive and in the legislative branch of the state.

 

WGSS 692A/292A - Sex, Love and Relationships
Monday 2:30-3:45 and online work
Angie Willey

Blended in-person/online class.  This course will explore queer feminist thinking about sex, love, and relationality. We will begin by examining how these terms are used and concepts mobilized in our worlds and in scholarship. Together over the course of the semester we will consider topics such as desire, pleasure, pornography, consent, monogamy, polyamory, marriage, friendship, and community. Through our treatments of these topics we will explore questions such as: What is compulsory sexuality? What counts as sex? What is love? What sorts of hierarchies structure the relationships in our lives? What are the histories of concepts like “normal” and “healthy” and how do they shape our understandings of sex, love, and relationships? How are ideas about sex, love, and relating connected to histories of race, nation, and capital that on the surface seem unrelated to such “personal” matters? How do we narrate what our relationships mean to us and what we want from them?

 

WGSS 692F – Contemporary Black Feminist Thought
Thursday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Fumi Okiji

This seminar considers contemporary Black feminist thought as a substantial critique of Western modernity, and as a source of social and epistemological alternatives. Focusing on a series of monographs published since the turn into the twenty-first century, we will sketch the current state of an undisciplined field, that coincides a thorough-going account of subjection and erasure with the founding - through thought and action - of new worlds and ways of being. Our enquiries will touch upon themes of pleasure and desire, black geographies, poetics/poethics, black iconicity, and care and affect. Alongside individual preparation and group discussion, participants will extend their skills for collaborative study.

 

WGSS 695A – Transnational Feminisms
Monday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Laura Briggs

How does a consideration of feminist concerns - gender, sexuality, the private, the domestic - help us interpret the current conjuncture? To get at these questions, this class will take up issues of secularism, neoliberalism, human rights, health, imperialism, epistemology, transnationalism, reproduction, and sexuality as they structure the relationship of the U.S. to the global south (particularly Latin America).

 

 

COMP-LIT 691RS – Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Translation
Monday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Corine Tachtiris

This course takes a critical look at issues of race, gender, and sexuality both in translated texts and in the translation profession. Readings will include: translation studies scholarship addressing race, gender, and sexuality; example translations dealing with these issues; and scholarship from critical race and ethnic studies and gender and sexuality studies. The objectives of the course include developing a reflective, ethical practice for translating discourse around race, gender, and sexuality as well as developing strategies to address the marginalization of certain identities in the profession (queering translation, combatting pay inequity for women translators, increasing the number of domestic translators of color, etc.). Students will prepare a critical essay that can be developed into an article or dissertation chapter; or a translation with a critical reflection that can be submitted for publication.

 

ENGLISH 891FR - Feminist Rhetorical Theory
Tuesday 1:00-3:30 p.m.
Rebecca Dingo

Feminist rhetorical theory began as a historical recovery effort in the late 1980s and 1990s whereby feminist rhetorical scholars sought to add to the classical rhetorical canon women’s voices. However, it is now a dynamic and robust part of rhetorical scholarship.  This class will take an in-depth look at the development of feminist rhetorical theory and in doing so, place this development alongside core conversations in Feminist Studies more broadly.  Following the lead of feminist scholar Clare Hemmings’ approach to critically analyzing a field and considering the politics of it grammar, we will take note of the patterns of inquiry and scholarship that have taken place across the field in order to consider the utility (and indeed, ask utility for whom and at what point?) for feminist work in rhetoric and composition studies. In particular, we will examine how race and difference, class and political economy, and geopolitics intersect (or how they don’t) with gender in the field of feminist rhetorical studies and in doing so, create a vision for the future of feminist scholarship in feminist rhetorical studies. 

 

ENGLISH 891TS – The Human, the Post-Human and Race:  The Tempest to the Shape of Water
Tuesday  1:00-3:30 p.m.
Jane Degenhardt

This course explores a neglected encounter in the academy’s interest in theories of the post-human--either from an ecological animal studies or technological paradigm: the relationship between the post-human and race. While theories attempting to move beyond the human/non-human divide often dissolve or deny differences of race, contemporary critics working in the tradition of Afro-pessimism have demonstrated how theories of the human always imply a logic of race. This course will trace the early modern roots of race in popular humanist discourses, joining early modern writings to contemporary theoretical writing and cultural productions. Taking a historicized approach, we will read a range of early modern texts that seek, implicitly or explicitly, to define the limits of the human in relation to categories of the divine, the animal, and the inanimate. These texts will include prose writings in natural philosophy, religion, and travel, as well as plays by Shakespeare and fictional writings such as Blazing World, The New Atlantis, and Oroonoko. We will consider theories of disability and emerging questions about what abilities or characteristics make a person more or less human. We will trace the uneven process by which the human assumed a hierarchical distinction within the realm of nature, how this hierarchy became manifested through new perspectives on the relationship between human and world, and the origins of further categorical distinctions such as kind, species, personhood, and race. Surveying foundational and emerging theory ranging from Michel Foucault and Bruno Latour to Cary Wolfe, Donna Haraway, and Judith Halberstam, to Sylvia Wynter, Zakiyyah Iman Jackson, and Mel Chen, we will seek to take stock of what is gained and lost by the post-human theoretical move. We will also consider how understandings of the human inform a philosophy of human rights and ethics--engaging a sampling of writings by Hannah Arendt, Emmanuel Levinas, and Edouard Glissant. Finally, we think about what specific questions are brought to bear on the post-human by critics of race and colonialism, as well as gender and sexuality, and whether these theoretical approaches might be reconciled.

 

SOCIOL 797P – Politics of Development
Wednesday  4:000-6:30 p.m.
Millicent Thayer

This course is intended to introduce students to the field of theorizing about processes of development and to the ways that different actors - states, social movements, international financial institutions, development agencies, NGOs, and the "populations" (farmers, women, ethnic/racial groups, refugees, street children, sex workers, small entrepreneurs etc.) on whose behalf they claim to act - have engaged with one another through their practices in this field. Our readings will be drawn from a wide array of disciplinary traditions, and will include development theory, theoretically informed case studies, and analyses of the empirical practices of participants in the development process.

 

SUMMER 2019 ONLINE CLASSES
Registration for Fall 19 Online classes beings June 3 - see preliminary list below the summer list

WGSS 187 – Gender, Sexuality and Culture
Ryan Ambuter
Session 1

This course offers an introduction to some of the basic concepts and theoretical perspectives in Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies. Drawing on disciplinary, interdisciplinary and cross-cultural studies, students will engage critically with issues such as gender inequities, sexuality, families, work, media images, queer issues, masculinity, reproductive rights, and history. Throughout the course, students will explore how experiences of gender and sexuality intersect with other social constructs of difference, including race/ethnicity, class, and age. Special attention will be paid to the ways in which interlocking systems of oppression have shaped and influenced the historical, cultural, social, political, and economical contexts of our lives, and the social movements at the local, national and transnational levels which have led to key transformations. (Gen. Ed. I, DU)

 

WGSS 205 – Feminist Health Politics
Kirsten Leng
Session 2
Distribution Requirement:  Sexuality Studies

What is health?  What makes health a matter of feminism?  And what might a feminist health politics look like?  These questions lay at the heart of this course.  In Feminist Health Politics, we will examine how health becomes defined, and will question whether health and disease are objectively measured conditions or subjective states.  We will also consider why and how definitions and standards of health have changed over time; why and how standards and adjudications of health vary according to gender, race, sexuality, class, and nationality; and how definitions of health affect the way we value certain bodies and ways of living.   Additionally, we will explore how knowledge about health is created; how environmental conditions, social location, politics, and economic conditions affect health; how various groups have fought for changes to health care practices and delivery; and how experiences of health and illness have been reported and represented.

 

WGSS 291R – Gender, Race and Family
Mahala Stewart
Session 1
Distribution Requirement:  Critical Race Feminisms

Through this course we will examine how gender and race shape families. We will trace varied meanings, needs and functions of families as seen across time and place. We begin by studying the history of the family in the United States, and how constructions of race and gender are implicated in family life and the meanings that exist around what constitutes family. Next we consider how gender and race shape the varied forms that contemporary families take, moving into a discussion of intimate relationships and marriage as one focus point around which some families form. From there we move into various modes and approaches to the reproduction of future generations, often the result of intimate relationships and marriages. We will then consider dynamics and experiences of parents and children, ending the course by considering forms of care provided within families for those in early and later life.  Across the course units, we will pay particular attention to the influence of gender and race within and across families, as well as other categories of difference including, ethnicity, social class, sexuality and citizenship. We will examine how notions of family are tied to power and inequalities. The course mainly examines families within the United States, although we will consider some experiences of families spanning transnational contexts. Through readings, lectures and lively online discussions and papers, you will have the chance to reflect on how family shapes your own experience.

 

WGSS 292M – Sex, Race and Medicine
Seda Saluk
Session 1
Distribution Requirement:  Critical Race Feminisms, Sexuality Studies, Transnational Feminisms

This course is for the exploration of biomedicine, medical technologies, and bioethics through the lenses of queer, feminist, critical race, and postcolonial theories. Through interdisciplinary inquiry, the course focuses on the role of politics of difference and inequality in the construction and embodiment of the body, health, and illness from a historical and cross-cultural perspective. The first section of the course, "Feminists Theorize the Body, Health, and Medicine," builds a shared set of theoretical tools and language for thinking, talking, and writing about bodies, health, and biomedicine. The second section, "(Global) Inequalities, Health, and Social Justice," examines how (global) inequalities deeply influence the production, regulation, and embodiment of difference as well as how social movements counter these processes. The topics in this section include structural violence and health disparities; racialization of diseases and treatments; biomedical construction of sex and gender binary; disability and eugenics; and social justice and health activism. The last section, "Remaking of Bodies, Lives, and Markets," explores some of the cutting-edge developments in biomedical technologies as well as ethical concerns around them. The topics in this section include new medical technologies (organ donation/transplantation, assisted reproduction, and genetic testing) and commodification of the body and biotechnologies.

 

WGSS 297R – Sex, Race and Cinema
Rachel Briggs
Session 2
Distribution Requirement:  Critical Race Feminisms, Sexuality Studies

This course will investigate representations of gender, sexuality, and race in U.S. cinema. We will screen a wide variety of films, from Hitchcock's Rear Window to the Wachowskis' neo-noir crime thriller, Bound, in order to examine the male gaze and gendered archetypes, including the femme fatale, the matriarch, and the "good wife." We will also address the issue of genre--including melodrama, horror, and science fiction--and the ways in which the constructions of genre are embedded in gendered and raced relations. We will spend the bulk of the course viewing films, reading theory that addresses issues raised in the film, and engaging in online discussions. Assignments will include two media analyses of films and a final reflection paper that addresses personal media consumption.

 

 

These courses from other UMass departments at 200-level and above automatically count towards the WGSS major or minor.  100-level courses only count towards the WGSS minor.

 

COMM 288 – Gender, Sex & Representation
Session 1 – Sut Jhally

This course will examine the relationship between commercialized systems of representation and the way that gender and sexuality are thought of and organized in the culture. In particular, we will look at how commercial imagery impacts upon gender identity and the process of gender socialization. Central to this discussion will be the related issues of sexuality and sexual representation (and the key role played by advertising).

 

ENGLISH 132 – Gender, Sexuality, Literature, and Culture
Session 1 – Hazel Gedikli
Session 2 – John Yargo

Literature treating the relationship between man and woman. Topics may include: the nature of love, the image of the hero and heroine, and definitions, past and present, of the masculine and feminine.  (Gen.Ed. AL, DG)

 

FILM-ST 497W – Women’s Cinema
Session 2 – Barbara Zecchi

A close examination of films directed by women from around the globe through the viewpoint of gender and film theories. This class will engage several of the most recurrent topics that shape women's films (such as patriarchal society and traditional gender roles, motherhood, violence against women, the female body and women?s sexuality, among others) in comparison with how these same themes surface, if they do, in hegemonic cinema (i.e. in mainstream Hollywood and in national male-authored productions). By tackling the so-called gender-genre debate, it will address how women use (or subvert) different male-dominated cinematic forms (i.e. if there is a female version of the comedy, a women’s road movie, film noir, etc.). Finally, it will address whether and how these films reflect a female idiosyncrasy, a woman's language, a female gaze. Class will include recent films by women filmmakers such as Chantal Akerman (Belgium), Isabel Coixet (Catalonia), Lucia Puenzo (Argentina), Claire Denis (France), Alankrita Shrivastava (India), Deniz Gamze Erguven (Turkey), Iciar Bollain (Spain), Nadine Labaki (Lebanon), among others. Films are shown in their original versions with English subtitles. Course will be taught in English. UMass Undergraduate Film Certificate category: IIA, IV, V

 

PSYCH 391GB – LGBTQ+ Issues in Psychology
Session 1 – Krystal Cashen

This course is intended to introduce students to topics within psychology relevant to the experiences of LGBTQ+ individuals. Within this course, we will discuss relevant theories and methodologies. We will also review current empirical work in the areas of sexual and gender identity development, experiences of stigma and discrimination and their associations with mental health, romantic relationships of LGBTQ+ individuals, and LGBTQ+ parented families.

 

STPEC 190X – American Nightmare:  Police Killings and Incarceration in the United States
Session 1 – Graciela Monteagudo

This course will examine the complex intersection of race, gender, sexuality, and class to understand the phenomenon of police killings and high rates of incarceration in the United States. Students will read about incarceration as a normalizing technique by the state to discipline the population, and will reflect on multiple instances of police killings of People of Color on the streets of this country. The goal of this course is for students to have the opportunity to discuss these key societal issues through a variety of disciplines, including philosophy, anthropology, history, economics, Black, Native American, and women, gender and sexuality studies. (Gen. Ed. SB, DU)

 

 

COMPONENT COURSES

WGSS majors and minors must focus their paper(s) or projects on WGSS topics to count component courses.  Please note that 100-level courses only count towards the WGSS minor.

 

ANTHRO 258 – Food and Culture
Session 1 – Cary Speck

This course surveys how cultural anthropologists have studied the big questions about food and culture. How and why do people restrict what foods are considered "edible" or morally acceptable? How is food processed and prepared, and what does food tell us about other aspects of culture like gender and ethnic identity? How have power issues of gender, class, and colonialism shaped people's access to food? How has industrialization changed food, and where are foodways headed in the future? Along the way, students will read and see films about foodways in Europe, Africa, Asia, the United States, and Latin America. (Gen. Ed. SB, DG)

 

HISTORY 154 – Social Change in the 1960s
Session 2 – Julia Sandy-Bailey

This course focuses on the "Long Sixties," a period stretching from the mid-1950s to the mid-1970s. We will look in new ways at topics you are probably already familiar with: the civil rights movement, the anti-Vietnam War movement, counterculture, sexual experimentation, and never trusting anyone over 30. We will also explore aspects of the Sixties you may not know about or associate with a different era, such as the Great Society, a thriving conservative movement, environmentalism, and gay rights. Students will view online lectures, participate in online discussions, and complete assignments which include reviewing music, movies, and books from the sixties.

 

HISTORY 264 – History of Health Care and Medicine in the U.S.
Session 1 – Emily Redman

This course explores the history and social meaning of medicine, medical practice, health care, and disease in the United States from 1600 to the present. Using a variety of sources aimed at diverse audiences students will investigate topics such as: the evolution of beliefs about the body; medical and social responses to infectious and chronic disease; the rise of medical science and medical organizations; the development of medical technologies; mental health diagnosis and treatment; changing conceptions of the body; the training, role, and image of medical practitioners and the role of public and government institutions in promoting health practices and disease treatments. We will pay particular attention to the human experience of medicine, with readings on the experience of being ill, the delivery of compassionate care, and the nature of the relationship between practitioners and patients. Course themes will include race, gender, cultural diversity, women and gender, social movements, science, technology, politics, industry, and ethics. (Gen. Ed. HS, DU)

 

PUBHLTH 389 – Health Inequities
Session 2 – Torin Moore

While the health and wellbeing of the nation has improved overall, racial, ethnic, gender and sexuality disparities in morbidity and mortality persist. To successfully address growing disparities, it is important to understand social determinants of health and translate current knowledge into specific strategies to undo health inequalities. This course will explore social justice as a philosophical underpinning of public health and will consider the etiology of disease rooted in social conditions. It aims to strengthen critical thinking, self-discovery, and knowledge of ways in which socioeconomic, political, and cultural systems structure health outcomes. (Gen. Ed. SB, DU)

 

SOCIOL 103 – Social Problems
Session 1 – Blair Harrington

Introduction to sociology.  America's major social problems--past and present--are examined.  These include crime, mental health, drug addiction, family tensions and inequalities based on race, gender, ethnicity and social class. (Gen.Ed. SB, DU)

 

PUBHLTH 370 – Public Health Through the Ages:  A History of Public Health Practice in the United States
Session 2 – Kelsey Jordan

This course will provide emerging public health professionals with an overview of the historical evolution of the field of public health, from Hippocrates to war and industrialization; from the sanitary movement, quarantine, and the development of public health boards; to the ethical concerns linked to the management and control of disease and promotion of health. In the second half of the semester, we will use the example of maternal and reproductive health to illustrate some of the underlying tensions in current public health research and programming. Enhancing students’ understanding of the history of public health will provide essential perspectives on current public health events and concerns to both inform and strengthen approaches to improving overall health.


FALL 2019 ONLINE CLASSES
Registration beings June 3

WGSS 395G – Gender, Sexuality, Race, and the Law
Adina Giannelli

Drawing on U.S. Supreme Court jurisprudence, gender and sexuality studies, sociological literature, policy papers, documentary, and international law, we will examine the ways in which gender, sexuality, and race are constructed, contested, and regulated within legal, legislative, and juridical frameworks, across systems, spaces, and temporalities. Throughout this course, we will consider what the law is, what it does, how it operates to uphold systems of power and oppression and how it can be deployed in the service of intervention. More relevant issues and problems within civil rights, constitutional, family, and criminal law, considering topics including: the legal construction of race, gender, and sexuality; feminist approaches to the law of gender, sexuality, and race; the role of privacy, morality, and "rights" in the regulation of sexuality and the family; reproductive rights; adoption, bioethics, family formation, immigration, reproductive technologies, and violence; and finally, the relationship between legal intervention, critical race & feminist theory, activism, and praxis.

 

 

 

These courses from other UMass departments at 200-level and above automatically count towards the WGSS major or minor.  100-level courses only count towards the WGSS minor.

 

ENGLISH 132 – Gender, Sexuality, Literature, and Culture
TBD

Literature treating the relationship between man and woman. Topics may include: the nature of love, the image of the hero and heroine, and definitions, past and present, of the masculine and feminine.  (Gen.Ed. AL, DG)

 

HISTORY 389 – U.S. Women’s History Since 1890
TBD

Explores the relationship of women to the social, cultural, economic and political developments shaping American society from 1890 to the present. Examines women's paid and unpaid labor, family life and sexuality, feminist movements and women's consciousness; emphasis on how class, race, ethnicity, and sexual choice have affected women's historical experience. Sophomore level and above.  (Gen.Ed. HS, DU)

 

SOCIOL 106 – Race, Gender, Class & Ethnicity
Ashley Garner

Introduction to Sociology.  Analysis of the consequences of membership in racial, gender, class and ethnic groups on social, economic and political life.   
(Gen.Ed. SB, DU)

 

SOCIOL 397GF – Gender, Crime, and Families
Sarah Becker

Families are a major social institution that operate as a cornerstone of human experiences. They also deeply impact broader social structures due to their central position as an arbiter between individuals and an array of other institutions such as communities, schools, and the criminal justice system. In this course, we examine the interrelationship between gender, crime, and families. Doing so provides an opportunity for nuanced engagement with existing social science research on gender and crime and how that relationship impacts and is shaped by family/families.  Interdisciplinary in nature, this course will draw on studies from Sociology, Criminology, Criminal Justice, and Social Work.  This course can be used towards the Certificate in Social Work and Social Welfare and the Criminology and Criminal Justice System Certificate.

 

COMPONENT COURSES

WGSS majors and minors must focus their paper(s) or projects on WGSS topics to count component courses.  Please note that 100-level courses only count towards the WGSS minor.

 

HISTORY 154 – Social Change in the 1960s
Julia Sandy-Bailey

Few periods in United States. history experienced as much change and turmoil as the "Long Sixties" (1954-1975), when powerful social movements overhauled American gender norms, restructured the Democratic and Republican parties, and abolished the South's racist "Jim Crow" regime. This course examines the movements that defined this era. We will explore the civil rights and Black Power movements; the student New Left and the antiwar movement; the women's and gay liberation movements; struggles for Asian American, Chicano/a, Native American, and Puerto Rican freedom; as well as the rise of conservatism. Throughout the semester, we will assess Sixties social movements' ideals, strategies, and achievements, and their ongoing influence upon U.S. politics, society, and culture. (Gen.Ed. HS, DU)

 

SOCIOL 397AM – Asylums, Madness, Mental Illness
Janice Irvine

9/3/19-10/17/19 - This course uses the rise and fall of the asylum movement to examine shifting ideas about "mental illness" and its treatment, from the mid-19th century to the deinstitutionalization movement of the 1970s. Born of a utopian spirit dedicated to healing minds broken by the modern world, insane asylums devolved into "theaters of madness" where "lunatics" were stigmatized and warehoused. Race, gender, class, and sexuality shaped how mental illness has been conceptualized and treated over a pivotal century in American culture. Using sociological research and popular culture - such as films, novels, and television - we examine the asylum as a type of social control, and mid-20th century criticisms of asylums as "total institutions."

 

 

SWAG 207/ASLC 207/POSC 207 – The Home and the World: Women and Gender in South Asia

Tuesday, Thursday  8:30-9:50 a.m.

Krupa Shandilya

 

This course will study South Asian women and gender through key texts in film, literature, history and politics. How did colonialism and nationalism challenge the distinctions between the “home” and the “world” and bring about partitions which splintered once shared cultural practices? What consequences did this have for postcolonial politics? How do ethnic conflicts, religious nationalisms and state repression challenge conceptions of home? How have migrations, globalization and diasporas complicated relations between the home and the world?

 

SWAG 210/ANTH 210 – Anthropology of Sexuality

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:20 a.m.

Sahar Sadjadi

 

This course draws on anthropological literature to study the socio-cultural making of human sexuality and its variations. We will critically examine theories of sexuality as a domain of human experience and locate sexual acts, desires and relations in particular historical and cultural contexts. The course offers analytical tools to understand and evaluate different methods and approaches to the study of human sexuality. We will examine the relation of sex to kinship/family, to reproduction and to romance. As we read about the bodily experience of sexual pleasure, we will explore how sexual taboos, norms and morality develop in various cultures and why sex acquires explosive political dimensions during certain historical periods. The course will explore the gendered and racial dimensions of human sexual experience in the context of class, nation and empire. How do class divisions produce different sexual cultures? What economies of sex are involved in sex work, marriage and immigration? What has been the role of sexuality in projects of nation building and in colonial encounters? When, where and how did sexuality become a matter of identity? In addition to a focus on contemporary ethnographic studies of sexuality in various parts of the world, we will read theoretical and historical texts that have been influential in shaping the anthropological approaches to sexuality. We will also briefly address scientific theories of sexuality.

 

SWAG 243/AMST 240 – Rethinking Pocahontas: An Introduction to Native American and Indigenous Studies

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:20

Kiara M. Vigil

 

[Pre-1900] From Longfellow’s Hiawatha and D.H. Lawrence’s Studies in Classic American Literature to Disney’s Pocahontas and more recently Moana to James Cameron’s Avatar, representations of the Indigenous as “Other” have greatly shaped cultural production in America as vehicles for defining the nation and the self. This interdisciplinary course introduces students to the broad field of Native American and Indigenous Studies, by engaging a range of texts from law to policy to history and literature as well as music and aesthetics. Film will also provide grounding for our inquiries. By keeping popular culture, representation, and the nature of historical narratives in mind, we will consider the often mutually constitutive relationship between American identity and Indian identity as we pose the following questions: How have imaginings of a national space and national culture by Americans been shaped by a history marked by conquest and reconciliation with Indigenous peoples? And, how have the myths of conquest become a part of education and popular representations to mask settler colonial policies and practices that seek to “erase in order to replace” the Native? This course also considers how categories like race, class, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and religion have defined identities and changed over time with particular regards to specific Native American individuals and tribal nations. Students will be able to design their own final research project. It may focus on either a historically contingent or contemporary issue related to Native American people in the United States that is driven by a researchable question based on working with an Indigenous author’s writings from the Kim-Wait/Pablo Eisenberg (or KWE for short) collection of Native American Literature books in the archives of Amherst College.

 

SWAG 260/PHIL 260 – Introduction to Feminist Philosophy: Subjectivity, Embodiment, and Situatedness

Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:20 p.m.

Lisa Käll

 

The course will introduce concepts that feminists and queer theorists have developed in continental philosophy, phenomenology and existentialism. It will further explore feminist philosophies of sexual difference developed primarily in the French feminist tradition. We will address the role of the lived body in feminist and intersectional theories of gender, sexuality, and identity; the relation between self and other; the situatedness of subjectivity; and the meaning of sexual difference. We will study texts by Simone de Beauvoir, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Luce Irigaray, Adriana Cavarero, Frantz Fanon, Judith Butler, and Sara Ahmed, among others. In addition to original philosophical texts, we will use a variety of inter-disciplinary materials, such as film, literature, art, personal narratives, medical texts and empirical studies to approach the themes at hand.

 

SWAG 294/BLST 294/EUST 294 – Black Europe

Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:50 p.m.

Khary O. Polk

 

This research-based seminar considers the enduring presence of people of African descent in Europe from the nineteenth century to the contemporary moment, a fact that both confounds and extends canonical theories of African diaspora and black internationalism.  Focusing particularly on the histories of black people in Britain, Germany, and France, this course will take an interdisciplinary approach in its study of the African diaspora in Europe. We will examine literature, history, film, art and ephemera, as well as newly available pre-1927 audio recordings from Bear Family Records (http://www.black-europe.com/) in effort to better comprehend the materiality of the black European experience. These inquiries will enable us to comment upon the influence black people continue to have upon Europe today. Reading the central texts in the emerging field of Black European Studies—including African American expatriate memoirs, Afro-German feminist poetry, and black British cultural theory—student work will culminate in an annotated bibliography and a multimedia research project.

 

SWAG 303/ANTH 300/SOCI 300 – On Display: Race and Reproduction in Film and Media

Monday  2:00-4:45 p.m.

Haile E. Cole

 

Reproductive Justice operates at the intersections of both reproductive rights and social justice. In its simplest form, it is a framework that addresses the right to have a child or not as well as the right to parent and raise a child in a healthy and safe environment. Using this framework as an analytical lens, this course seeks to examine representations of race and reproduction in film and media. Given growing national and international interest in maternal health disparities in the United States, reproduction and race currently sit center stage for broad public consumption. Yet, the exhibition of reproductive bodies is not a new phenomenon. This course will examine film (both documentary and popular) as well as other visual media presentations in order to extrapolate the ways in which film and media 1) have depicted historically and continue to depict reproduction, 2) perpetuate and/or challenge stereotypes and the status quo, and 3) (re)create and/or challenge systems of power and social hierarchy. Each week students will view a film and read a set of accompanying texts that will address a variety of topics related to race, reproduction, and health.

 

SWAG 328 – Science and Sexuality

Tuesday  2:30-5:15 p.m.

Sahar Sadjadi

 

This seminar explores the role of science in the understanding and making of human sexuality.  The notion of “sexuality”--its emergence and its recent history--has an intimate relation to biology, medicine and psychology.  In this course we explore the historical emergence of the scientific model of sexuality and the challenges to this model posed from other worldviews and social forces, mainly religion, social sciences, and political movements. We examine how sex has intersected with race and nationality in the medical model (for instance, in the notion of degeneration), and we look closely at the conceptualization of feminine and masculine sexual difference.  We briefly address studies of animal models for human sexuality, and we examine in more depth case histories of “perversion,” venereal disease, orgasm and sex hormones. We also compare contemporary biological explanations of sexuality with the nineteenth-century ones, for instance, the notion of the “gay gene” as compared to the hereditary model of “sexual inversion.” Course readings include historical and contemporary sexological and biological texts (Darwin, Freud, Kinsey, etc.), their critiques, and contemporary literature in science studies, including feminist and queer studies of science. This seminar requires active participation, reading an array of diverse and interdisciplinary texts and preparing research-based papers and presentations.

 

SWAG 337/BLST 337 – Angela Davis

Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:50 p.m.

John Erwin Drabinski

 

Angela Davis’ work spans some of the most provocative and important cultural and political moments in recent U.S. history. Beginning with the Black Power and Black Panther movements of the late-1960s and 70s, through innovations in the Black feminist movement in the 1980s onward, and recently with questions of racialized mass incarceration and links between Palestinian and African-American freedom struggles, Davis has forged a militant vision of racial, sexual, and transnational liberation. Her writerly and analytic voice blends philosophy and political theory with the urgent demands of activism and direct action. In this course, we will read across her life’s work, beginning with early essays and her autobiography, up through recent reflections on mass incarceration, Palestine, and #BlackLivesMatter. As well, we will examine Davis' influences and how she transforms and extends their thought, ranging from Karl Marx and Herbert Marcuse to Frederick Douglass, Assata Shakur, and Huey Newton, among others. What emerges from these readings is a rigorous and radical vision of liberation drawn from a powerful mixture of critical theory, vernacular culture, and political activism.

 

 

SWAG 345/HIST 345/LLAS 345 – Gender and Sexuality in Latin America

Monday, Wednesday  2:00-3:20 p.m.

Mary E. Hicks

 

Popular mythologies of Latin America have historically relied on hyper-masculine archetypes, including the conquistador, the caudillo, and the guerrillero to explain the continent’s past, culture and political development. By contrast, students in this course will be asked to bring women, gender and sexuality from the margins to the center of Latin American history. In doing so, we will reevaluate four transformative historical moments: the Spanish conquest, the wars of independence, the emergence of industrial capitalism, and the proliferation of late twentieth-century political revolutions. Through an exploration of these key periods of upheaval we will assess how social conflict was frequently mediated through competing definitions of masculinity and femininity. In addition, this course will explore the ways in which women’s activism has been central to social and political movements across the continent. Furthermore, we will investigate how the domain of sexual practice and reproduction underpinned broader conflicts over racial purity, worker power, and the boundaries of citizenship in racially and ethnically diverse societies. The course will culminate in a final research paper on a topic chosen by the student.

 

SWAG 347/BLST 347 – Race, Sex, and Gender in the U.S. Military

Tuesday, Thursday 10:00-11:20 a.m.

Khary O. Polk

 

From the aftermath of the Civil War to today's "global war on terror," the U.S. military has functioned as a vital arbiter of the overlapping taxonomies of race, gender, and sexuality in America and around the world. This course examines the global trek of American militarism through times of war and peace in the twentieth century. In a variety of texts and contexts, we will investigate how the U.S. military's production of new ideas about race and racialization, masculinity and femininity, and sexuality and citizenship impacted the lives of soldiers and civilians, men and women, at "home" and abroad. Our interdisciplinary focus will allow us to study the multiple intersections of difference within the military, enabling us to address a number of topics, including: How have African American soldiers functioned as both subjects and agents of American militarism? What role has the U.S. military played in the creation of contemporary gay and lesbian subjectivity? Is military sexual assault a contemporary phenomenon or can it be traced to longer practices of sexual exploitation occurring on or around U.S. bases globally?

 

SWAG 365/ENGL 372 – Reading the Romance

Wednesday 2:00-4:45 p.m.

Krupa Shandilya

 

Do people the world over love in the same way, or does romance mean different things in different cultures?  What happens when love violates social norms?  Is the “romance” genre an escape from real-world conflicts or a resolution of them? This course analyzes romantic narratives from across the world through the lens of feminist theories of sexuality, marriage, and romance. We will read heterosexual romances such as Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice and Kamila Shamsie’s Home Fire, alongside queer fiction such as Sarah Waters’ Fingersmiths and Radclyffe Hall’s Well of Loneliness. We will also pay attention to the Western romantic-comedy film, the telenovela and the Bollywood spectacular.

 

 

 

SWAG 411/POSC 411 – Indigenous Women and World Politics

Wednesday  2:00-4:45 p.m.

Manuela Picq

 

Indigenous women are rarely considered actors in world politics. Yet from their positions of marginality, they are shaping politics in significant ways. This course inter-weaves feminist and Indigenous approaches to suggest the importance of Indigenous women’s political contributions. It is an invitation not merely to recognize their achievements but also to understand why they matter to international relations.  This course tackles varied Indigenous contexts, ranging from pre-conquest gender relations to the 1994 Zapatista uprising. We will learn how Indigenous women played diplomatic roles and led armies into battle during colonial times. We will analyze the progressive erosion of their political and economic power, notably through the introduction of property rights, to understand the intersectional forms of racial, class, and gender violence. Course materials explore the linkages between sexuality and colonization, revealing how sexual violence was a tool of conquest, how gender norms were enforced and sexualities disciplined. In doing so, we will analyze indigenous women’s relationship to feminism as well as their specific struggles for self-determination. We will illustrate the sophistication of their current activism in such cases as the Maya defense of collective intellectual property rights. As we follow their struggles from the Arctic to the Andes, we will understand how indigenous women articulate local, national, and international politics to challenge state sovereignty.

 

SWAG 436/HIST 436 – Race, Gender, and Sexuality in U.S. History

Tuesday  1:00-3:45 p.m.

Jen Manion

 

This course introduces students to critical theories of difference in thinking and writing about the past. We will read major works that chart the history of the very concepts of race, gender, and sexuality. We will explore how these ideas were both advanced and contested by various groups over the years by reading primary sources such as newspaper articles, personal letters, court records, and organizational papers. Movements for women’s rights, racial justice, and LGBTQ liberation have dramatically shaped these debates and their implications. In particular, feminist theory, critical race theory, and queer theory provide powerful arguments about how we formulate research questions, what constitutes a legitimate archive, and why writing history matters. Students will learn to identify and work with an archive to craft a major research paper in some aspect of U.S. history while engaging the relevant historic arguments about race, gender, and/or sexuality.

CSI 176 – Women’s Writing, Art, and Music in Medieval and Early Modern Europe (ca. 1100-1800)

Tuesday, Thursday  9:00-10:20 a.m.

Jutta Sperling

 

This course is an introductory history course based entirely on primary literature, art, and music written and produced by women from various parts of Europe, Mexico, and Ethiopia. We will read letters, scientific treatises, autobiographies, and political writings by prominent mystics (Saints Hildegard of Bingen, Catherine of Siena, Teresa of Avila, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz and Walatta Pretos), proto-feminist writers (Christine de Pizan and Moderata Fonte), female physicians and midwives (Trotula, Olivia Sabuco de Nantes Barrera, Jane Sharp), Jewish businesswomen (Glickl van Hameln), fake saints (Cecilia Ferazzi), courtesans (Veronica Franco), cross-dressing soldiers (Catalina/o de Erauso), and French revolutionaries (Olympe de Gouges). In addition, we will listen to music by Francesca Caccini and Italian nuns and view the art of Artemisia Gentileschi, Lavinia Fontana, and Sofonisba Anguissola.

 

CSI 206 – Transnational History of Koreans in the Americas

Tuesday, Thursday  9:00 – 10:20 a.m.

Lili Kim

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This course examines the transnational history of Koreans in the United States and the Americas, beginning in 1903 when the first-wave of Koreans arrived in Hawai'I as sugar plantation laborers. We will examine the history of Korean immigration to the United States in the context of larger global labor migrations. The topics we will consider include racialization of Korean immigrants against the backdrop of the Anti-Asian movement in California. Japanese colonization of Korea with its impact on the development of Korean American nationalism, changing dynamics of gender and family relations in Korean American communities, the Korean War and the legacies of U.S. militarism in Korea, the post-1965 "new" wave of Korean immigrants, Asian American movement, Sa-I-Gu (the 1992 LA Koreatown racial unrest), the myth of model minority, and the birth of "Korean cool" through K-pop. The focus will be on the transnational linkages between Korea and the United States and the connections between U.S. foreign policies and domestic issues that influenced the lives and experiences of Koreans in the Americas.

 

CSI 222 – Race and the Queer Politics of the Prison States

Monday, Wednesday  10:30-11:40 a.m.

Stephen Dillon

 

This course explores the history and politics of gender and sexuality in relation to the racial politics of prisons and the police. By engaging recent work in queer studies, feminist studies, transgender studies, and critical prison studies, we will consider how prisons and police have shaped the making and remaking of race, gender, and sexuality from slavery and conquest to the contemporary period. We will examine how police and prisons have regulated the body, identity, and populations, and how larger social, political, and cultural changes connect to these processes. While we will focus on the prison itself, we will also think of policing in a more expansive way by analyzing the racialized regulation of gender and sexuality on the plantation, in the colony, at the border, in the welfare office, and in the hospital, among other spaces, historical periods, and places.

 

CSI 227 – Young Revolutionaries:  Race, Gender, and Narratives of Emerging Political Consciousness

Monday  4:00-7:00 p.m.

Tammy Owens

 

This course explores narratives of black girlhood from the nineteenth century to our contemporary moment. Students will analyze black girlhood through a diverse collection of sources including young adult literature, street lit, personal narratives, and recent scholarship in Black Girlhood Studies. We will consider the following questions: How do the intersections of race, class, gender, and geography impact the ways we understand girlhood? How have black girls defined girlhood and the transition from black girl to black woman? How do representations of black girlhood challenge dominant conceptualizations of American childhood and young adulthood? To answer these questions, students will examine the racialization of girlhood, the criminalization of black girls, sexual literacy, youth activism, education, and black girls in social media and hip-hop culture. Some of the texts we will engage include The Coldest Winter Ever (Sister Souljah) and Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools (Monique Morris).

 

CSI 238 – Population and Development

Monday  1:00-3:50 p.m.

Anne Hendrixson

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This course is a critical introduction to international development history and theory, through the lens of population, or "overpopulation." "Overpopulation" has been seen as a fundamental impediment to nations' economic and social development and a global environmental and security crisis requiring an emergency response on an international scale. We will upend this account of population drawing from feminist and critical race theorists, as well as global South perspectives on development. We will explore notions of environmental sustainability, gender and empowerment, race and threat in international development theory. We will look at the history of population control and trace the international shift toward sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR). We will examine current issues in SRHR alongside on-going population control abuses, including forced sterilization and mass dissemination of long-acting contraceptives. We will also investigate how current population dynamics, including divergent age distribution in the global North and South as well as increased migration, influence development in the era of climate change.

 

CSI 241 – Law, Sex, and Family in the Early Mondern Mediterranean (1300-1800)

Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:50 p.m.

Jutta Sperling

 

This course investigates the history of marriage, sex, and family in the Mediterranean. We will take a comparative perspective across the religious divide that leads us to assess differently structured patriarchal regimes in western and eastern parts of the Mediterranean. The point of this course is to integrate different bodies of scholarship, separate the issue of religion from family and gender history, and foreground the question of commensurability when analyzing divorce, child-rearing, same-sex desire, and women's access to property in Islamic, Jewish, Greek-Orthodox, and Catholic communities of the Mediterranean. Our cases studies include: marriage litigation cases among peasants in early modern France and Anatolia; child abandonment and wet-nursing in early modern Portugal; gift exchange at marriage and divorce in Renaissance Italy and Mamluk Egypt; male and female same sex desire in Renaissance Italy, the Ottoman Empire, and Safavid Iran.

 

CSI 244 – Gender and Work in the Global Economy

Monday, Wednesday  1:00-2:20 p.m.

Lynda Pickbourn

 

Economic restructuring informed by neoliberal policies and the reorganization of production in low, middle and high income countries has led to dramatic transformations in labor markets around the world. Using case-studies of formal and informal employment in the agricultural, manufacturing and care sectors in selected countries, this course analyzes the gendered dimensions of these processes, highlights the contradictory tendencies at work and emphasizes the shared concerns of workers across the globe.

 

CSI 274 – Cuba:  Nation, Race, and Revolution

Wednesday  1:00-3:50 p.m.

Flavio Risech-Ozeguera/Roosbelinda Cardenas

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This course proposes an interdisciplinary approach (historical, cultural) for a study of the complex and contested reality of Cuba. Displacing images of Cuba circulating in US popular and official culture, we examine the constructions of race, gender, and sexuality that have defined the Cuban nation. We will explore how Cuba can be understood in relation to the U.S., and to its own diasporas in Miami and elsewhere. The course will engage with primary texts, historiography, literature, film, and music to examine Cuba within these multiple frameworks. Students will complete frequent short response essays and a research project. This course is required for students wishing to study in the Hampshire in Cuba semester program (open to all Five College students), and will provide support for framing independent projects and applications for the Cuba Semester. Though conducted in English, many readings will be available in Spanish and English and papers may be submitted in either language. Concurrent enrollment in a Spanish language class is strongly recommended.

 

CSI 285 – Histories and Theories of Racial Capitalism

Monday, Wednesday  1:00-2:20 p.m.

Stephen Dillon

 

This course examines historical and theoretical scholarship capitalism. Focusing on the United States, the course explores research areas such as slavery, settler-colonialism, immigration and migration, the war on terror, economics, and the law. At the same time, we will also explore the relationship between gender, sexuality, and racial capitalism examining feminist, queer, and trans understandings of the foundational relationship between capitalism and race.

 

HACU 181 – Women in Game Programming
Monday, Wednesday  10:30-11:50 a.m.

Ira Fay

 

This course is designed to give students a strong introduction to computer programming, with an emphasis on programming games. No prior programming experience is necessary. As the title reveals, this course particularly invites self-identified women, though all interested students are of course welcome! We will consider (and hopefully impact) the current gender imbalances in the professional world of game development. The course will include guest interviews with notable women in game programming. By the end of the course, successful students will be able to write programs of moderate difficulty and use C# and Unity to implement computer games. As a course that can provide a solid foundation for further computer science courses, this class will expose students to variables, conditionals, loops, functions, comments, and object oriented programming concepts.

 

HACU 223 – Woman and Poet

Monday, Wednesday  1:00-2:20 p.m.

Lisa Sanders

 

In "A Room of One's Own," Virginia Woolf observed, "[The woman] born with a gift of poetry in the sixteenth century was an unhappy woman, a woman at strife against herself." What professional and personal challenges have female poets faced throughout history? How have women reconciled societal expectations of 'proper femininity' with the desire to write and publish? How has the marketplace influenced the development of poetry by women? How does the study of gender difference influence the process of reading and analyzing poems? These are some of the many questions this course will address in a wide-ranging but by no means exhaustive examination of Anglo-American women's poetry from the sixteenth century to the present. We will study the lives and works of poets ranging from Anne Bradstreet, Phillis Wheatley, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Emily Bronte and Emily Dickinson, to Marianne Moore, Elizabeth Bishop, Anne Sexton, and Sylvia Plath. The course will conclude with a discussion of contemporary poetry, paying particular attention to questions of race, ethnicity, and sexuality.

 

HACU 224 – Comedy & Critical Media Studies

Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:50 p.m.

Viveca Greene

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In this writing-intensive seminar, we explore a range of contemporary issues pertaining to comedy, satire, and parody in the U. S. from a critical media studies perspective. How do "nonserious" modes of communication allow people to speak the unspoken, to challenge (or reinforce) the political, social and cultural status quo, and to consolidate community? We begin by conceptually mapping how humorists responded to the 9/11 attacks, addressing the significance of comedic texts as sources of entertainment and catharsis, as well as political discourse and cultural engagement. We also examine how comedians address racism in their work, as well as how subsets of the extreme right, or so-called "alt-right," mobilize irony, satire, and humor to advance deadly serious white supremacist, anti-Semitic, and misogynist agendas. The course provides opportunities to explore feminist, queer, and other forms of identity-based comedy, but it does not offer instruction in creating or performing comedy.

 

HACU 232 – The American Broadway Musical:  A Social History

Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:50 p.m.

Rebecca Miller

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A uniquely American genre, the Broadway musical emerged from 19th-century minstrel shows, vaudeville, and operetta, and today, draws on a variety of music (jazz, popular, rock, rap), popular choreography, and creative adaptations of literary texts. Using the music, book, and choreography as primary sources, this course examines the Broadway musical from the perspective of a changing American social, political, and economic landscape over the 20th century. Students will engage with a variety of Broadway musicals as spectacles that entertain as well as texts that interrogate stereotypes specific to race, class, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality. In addition to completing a midterm essay (5-7 pages) and a final paper (10-12 pages), each student will present, in class, historical/archival research that contextualizes the current events at the time of the opening of a specific Broadway musical. Students will also complete weekly reading, listening/viewing, and short writing assignments, and attend occasional film screenings.

 

HACU 251 – Alien/Freak/Monster:  Race, Sex, and Disability in Science Fiction, Horror, and Fantasy

Tuesday, Thursday  10:30-11:50 a.m.

Suzanne Loza

 

This course examines questions of race, gender/sexuality, and disability in science fiction and horror films. It investigates how and why people in different social positions have been constructed as foreign, freakish, or monstrous. In addition to exploring the relationship between sex/gender norms and hierarchies based on race/species or class/caste, we will also consider the following questions: Does the figure of the alien/freak/monster reconfigure the relationship between bodies, technology, and the division of labor? How do such figures simultaneously buttress and transgress the boundary between human and non-human, normal and abnormal, Self and Other? How does society use the grotesque body of the alien/freak/monster to police the liminal limits of sexuality, gender, and ethnicity? How does The Other come to embody Pure Evil? Finally, what are the consequences of living as an alien/freak/monster for specific groups and individuals?

 

HACU 259 – Melodrama and Film Noir

Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:20 p.m.

Screenings, Monday  7:00-9:00 p.m.

Lise Sanders

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This course examines classical Hollywood cinema of the 1930s-1950s, focusing on the parallel genres of melodrama and film noir. These genres shared a production context (the Hollywood studio system at its height), an emphasis on gender (for melodrama in the form of the "weepie" or woman's film, and for film noir in its depiction of hard-boiled masculinity and the femme fatale), and an engagement with the pressing social and political issues of the era. In this course, we will ask why these genres flourished during this period, how they resonated with contemporary audiences, and whether they transformed over time. Films to be screened will include All About Eve, The Big Sleep, Kiss Me Deadly, Laura, The Maltese Falcon, Mildred Pierce, and Written on the Wind, accompanied by readings in film history, theory, and criticism.

 

HACU 279 - #HipHop to @BarackObama:  21st Century African American Literature

Monday  5:30-8:30 p.m.

Doctor Bynum

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What makes literature literary and hip hop music? What do these two have in common? We will examine the very meaning of African-American literature by reading and listening to contemporary writers. We will explore national experiences of race and African-American experience(s) of race, sexuality, gender, class, and privilege right now. Instead of focusing solely upon the ways in which this literature emerges within a book-based history, we will address (across time) the various ways in which poets, rappers, authors tackle these themes within literary forms: fiction, creative non-fiction, autobiography, poems, songs, etc. Writers and musicians may include: Jesmyn Ward, Jay-Z, Migos, Kiese Laymon, Ta-Nehisi Coates, and Toni Morrison.

 

HACU 306 – Feminist and Queer Theory Across the Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences

Tuesday  6:00-9:00 p.m.

Monique Roelofs

 

Beginning with Sara Ahmed's Living a Feminist Life, this course will continue with texts by theorists such as Audre Lorde, Gloria Anzalda, Maria Lugones, Judith Butler, Barbara Johnson, Gail Weiss, Anne Cheng, Jose Esteban Munoz, Gayle Salamon, and Mariana Ortega to investigate concepts and methods in feminist and queer studies. In the first part of the course, we will discuss readings selected by the instructor. In the segments of the semester that follow, we will study texts and cultural productions chosen by the students, and workshop drafts informed by the students' specific areas of interest.

 

IA 244 – Love, Gender and Sexuality in Contemporary African Societies

Tuesday, Thursday  10:30-11:50 a.m.

Nathalie Arnold

 

Across the globe, human beings of every status and background feel affection and desire for others, long for love and sex, and worry about how others see them. And all of us labor under hegemonic regimes of sexuality and gender that shape and limit our possibilities. However, Western representations of Africa continue to imagine Africans as 'inscrutable' and 'fundamentally other.' Bypassing old representations and insisting that we have much to learn from African societies, this interdisciplinary course asks: How is gender experienced in a variety of African contexts? How do different cultural contexts produce varied norms of beauty, sexuality, and partnership? How are romance and courtship pursued? How do members of sexual minorities support each other and create new ways of being? Through readings including ethnography, film, and fiction, we will consider gender, sexuality, desire, and love in African contexts, bringing our learning into conversation with our own lives and work.

GNDST 204BD – Body and Space

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-12:30 p.m.

R. Hachiyanagi

 

This course focuses on the issues surrounding body and space through installation, performance, and public arts. Students explore the possibilities of body as an energetic instrument, while investigating the connotations of various spaces as visual vocabulary. The self becomes the reservoir for expression. The course examines the transformational qualities of the body as the conduit that links conceptual and physical properties of materials and ideas.

 

GNDST 204CW/ASIAN 215/THEAT 234 – Androgyny and Gender Negotiation in Contemporary Chinese Women’s Theater

Wednesday  1:30-4:20 p.m.

Ying Wang

 

Yue Opera, an all-female art that flourished in Shanghai in 1923, resulted from China's social changes and the women's movement. Combining traditional with modern forms and Chinese with Western cultures, Yue Opera today attracts loyal and enthusiastic audiences despite pop arts crazes. We will focus on how audiences, particularly women, are fascinated by gender renegotiations as well as by the all-female cast. The class will read and watch classics of this theater, including Romance of the Western Bower, Peony Pavilion, and Butterfly Lovers. Students will also learn the basics of traditional Chinese opera.

 

GNDST 204CY – Simians, Cyborgs, and Women

Tuesday, Thursday  1:30-2:45 p.m.

Erika Rundle

 

This course offers an introduction to the work of feminist science scholar Donna Haraway, particularly as it relates to the cultural politics of primatology and cybernetics. We will focus on the social construction of "nature" as a system of production and reproduction in which women, apes, and cyborgs are bound together through fantasies of transcendence that mask the political, economic, and social underpinnings of scientific and technical knowledge. In addition to reading criticism by Haraway and others, we will examine twentieth-century literary, artistic, theatrical, and cinematic representations that engage with these three figures as they shape our notions of gender and species.

 

GNDST 204ET/ENGL 232 – Rovers, Cuckqueens, and Country Wives of All Kinds:  The Queer Eighteenth Century

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15  a.m.

Katherine Singer

 

With the rise of the two-sex model, the eighteenth century might be seen to be a bastion of heteronormativity leading directly to Victorian cis-gender binary roles of angel in the house and the bourgeois patriarch. Yet, beginning with the Restoration's reinvention of ribald theater, this period was host to a radical array of experimentation in gender and sexuality, alongside intense play with genre (e.g., the invention of the novel). We will explore queerness in all its forms alongside consideration of how to write queer literary histories.

 

GNDST 204TJ/CST 249TJ – Transforming Justice and Practicing Truth to Power:  Critical Methodologies and Methods in Community Participatory Action Research and Accountability

Wednesday  1:30-4:20 p.m.

Ren-yo Hwang

 

This course will offer an overview of select methodologies and methods from Community-based Participatory Action Research (CBPAR), Participatory Action Research (PAR), collaborative ethnography and other social justice research interventions such as radical oral history, grassroots research collectives, experimental digital archives, research and data justice networks and organizations. We will center on questions of "accountability"; that is, to whom, for whom, and to what end do processes of accountability serve those already in power? Moreover, we will investigate the chasms between academia and activism in order to explore the possibility of unlikely collaborative research alliances.

 

GNDST 210JD/JWST 234/RELIG 234 – Women and Gender in Judaism

Wednesday, Friday  1:30-2:45 p.m.

Mara H. Benjamin

 

This course examines gender as a key category in Jewish thought and practice. We will examine different theoretical models of gender, concepts of gender in a range of Jewish sources, and feminist Jewish responses to those sources.

 

GNDST 210SL/RELIG 207 – Women and Gender in Islam

Monday, Wednesday  9:30-10:45 a.m.

Amina Steinfels

 

This course will examine a range of ways in which Islam has constructed women--and women have constructed Islam. We will study concepts of gender as they are reflected in classical Islamic texts, as well as different aspects of the social, economic, political, and ritual lives of women in various Islamic societies.

 

GNDST 221QF – Feminist & Queer Theory

Tuesday, Thursday  2:55-4:10 p.m.

Christian Gundermann

 

We will read a number of key feminist texts that theorize sexual difference, and challenge the oppression of women. We will then address queer theory, an offshoot and expansion of feminist theory, and study how it is both embedded in, and redefines, the feminist paradigms. This redefinition occurs roughly at the same time (1980s/90s) when race emerges as one of feminism's prominent blind spots. The postcolonial critique of feminism is a fourth vector we will examine, as well as anti-racist and postcolonial intersections with queerness. We will also study trans-theory and its challenge to the queer paradigm.

 

GNDST 241/ANTHR 216HP – Feminist Health Politics

Tuesday, Thursday  1:30-2:45 p.m.

Jacquelyne Luce

 

Health is about bodies, selves and politics. We will explore a series of health topics from feminist perspectives. How do gender, sexuality, class, disability, and age influence the ways in which one perceives and experiences health and the access one has to health information and health care? Are heteronormativity, cissexism, or one's place of living related to one's health status or one's health risk? By paying close attention to the relationships between community-based narratives, activities of health networks and organizations and theory, we will develop a solid understanding of the historical, political and cultural specificities of health issues, practices, services and movements.

 

GNDST 333EG/ANTHR 316 EG – Eggs and Embryos:  Innovations in Reproductive and Genetic Technologies

Monday  1:30-4:20 p.m.

Jacquelyne Luce

 

This seminar will focus on emerging innovations in the development, use and governance of reproductive and genetic technologies (RGTs). How do novel developments at the interface of fertility treatment and biomedical research raise both new and enduring questions about the'naturalness' of procreation, the politics of queer families, the im/possibilities of disabilities, and transnational citizenship? Who has a say in what can be done and for which purposes? We will engage with ethnographic texts,documentaries, policy statements, citizen science activist projects, and social media in order to closely explore the diversity of perspectives in this field.

 

GNDST 333FM/LATST 350FM/CST 349FM – Latina Feminism(s)

Tuesday  1:30-4:20 p.m.

Vanessa Rosa

 

What is Latina Feminism? How does it differ from and/or intersect with "other" feminisms? In this seminar, we will explore the relationship between Latina feminist theory, knowledge production, and social change in the United States. This interdisciplinary course explores Latina feminism in relation to methodology and epistemology through a historical lens. This will help us to better understand how Latina feminist approaches can inform our research questions, allow us to analyze women's experiences and women's history, and challenge patriarchy and gender inequality. We will explore topics related to knowledge production, philosophies of the "self," positionality, inequality, the body, reproductive justice, representation, and community. Our approach in this class will employ an intersectional approach to feminist theory that understands the interconnectedness between multiple forms of oppression, including race, class, sexuality, and ability. Our goal is to develop a robust understanding of how Latina feminist methodologies and epistemologies can be tools for social change.

 

GNDST 333FS – Feminism’s Sciences

Thursday  1:30-4:20 p.m.

Angie Willey

 

Feminists have insisted on the importance of thinking about science, nature, and embodiment to understanding the worlds in which we live and imagining others. I use "feminism's sciences" to refer to sciences feminists have revised and reclaimed as well as to those knowledge-making projects that have been excluded from the definition of science, including epistemological, methodological, conceptual, and other critical-creative insights from a range of feminist theories and projects. We will explore rich debates in feminist theories of science and materiality over the last several decades and today and explore possibilities for contemporary queer feminist materialist science studies.

 

GNDST 333SS/ENGL 323 – Gender and Class in the Victorian Novel

Monday, Wednesday  1:30-2:45 p.m.

Amy E. Martin

 

This course will investigate how gender and class serve as structuring principles in the development of the Victorian novel in Britain, paying attention to the ways in which the form also develops in relation to emerging ideas about sexuality, race, nation, and religion. Novelists include Bronte, Dickens, Eliot, and Gaskell and we will read examples of domestic fiction, detective fiction, social realist novels, and the Victorian gothic.

 

GNDST 333TM/ENGL 350TM/AFCNA 341TM – Toni Morrison

Monday  1:30-4:20 p.m.

Kimberly Brown

 

This course will examine the work and the centralized black world of the last American Nobel laureate in literature, Toni Morrison. Morrison is the author of eleven novels and multiple other works, including nonfiction and criticism. In a career that has spanned over forty years and has informed countless artists and writers, Morrison's expansive cultural reach can hardly be measured accurately. In this course we will endeavor to critically analyze the arc and the import of many of Morrison's writings. Readings include: The Bluest Eye, Sula, Song of Solomon, Jazz, Playing in the Dark, Paradise, and A Mercy.

 

POLIT 255A – The Politics of Abortion in the Americas

Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.

Cora Fernandez-Anderson

 

The Americas have been characterized by the strictness of their laws in the criminalization of abortion. In some countries abortion is criminalized even when the woman's life is at risk. What role have women's movements played in advancing abortion rights? What has mattered most for a movement's success, its internal characteristics or external forces? Has the way the movement framed its demands mattered? How has the political influence of the Catholic and Evangelical churches influenced policies in this area? We will answer these questions by exploring examples from across the region through primary and secondary sources.

SWG 222 – Gender, Law and Policy

Monday, Wednesday, Friday  10:50-12:05 p.m.

Carrie N. Baker

 

This course explores the impact of gender on law and policy in the United States historically and today, focusing in the areas of constitutional equality, employment, education, reproduction, the family, violence against women, and immigration. We study constitutional and statutory law as well as public policy. Some of the topics we will cover are sexual orientation and gender identity discrimination, pregnancy/caregiver discrimination, pay equity, sexual harassment, school athletics, marriage, sterilization, contraception and abortion, reproductive technologies, sexual assault, intimate partner violence, and gender-based asylum. We will study feminist efforts to reform the law and examine how inequalities based on gender, race, class and sexuality shape the law. We also discuss and debate contemporary policy and future directions. 

 

SWG 228 – Theorizing Queer Feminism

Friday  2:45-4:00 p.m.

Angela Willey

 

This course is an introduction to queer feminist theory. We will consider varied articulations of both feminism and queerness and ways the relationship between them has been narrated and debated. Questions explored include: what might it mean to “queer” feminism? What might it mean to understand queerness through a feminist lens? How might we understand the place of the figure of the lesbian in imagining queer feminism? What sorts of ethical questions might queer feminist perspectives center? Concepts explored include: the centrality of race to concepts of gender and sexuality, relationships among feminist, queer, and trans studies, and sexual ethics

 

SWG 230 – Gender, Land and Food Movements

Monday, Wednesday  2:45-4:00 p.m.

Elisabeth Brownell Armstrong

 

We begin this course by working alongside Gardening the Community, a youth-based and anti-racist food and land movement in Springfield, MA. We center our studies on both regional and transnational women’s movements across the globe to develop our understanding about current economic trends in globalization processes. Through the insights of transnational feminist analysis, we map the history of land and food to imagine a more equitable present and future. Students will develop a community-based research project that spans issues of climate change, environmentalism, critical race analysis and feminism, write papers and written reflections about their work.

 

SWG 233 – Gender and Sexuality in Asian America

Tuesday, Thursday  1:20-2:35 p.m.

Jina Boyong Kim

 

Dragon ladies, lotus blossoms, geisha girls: The U.S. cultural imaginary is saturated with myths regarding Asian sexuality and gender. This interdisciplinary course intervenes into this dominant imaginary by exploring feminist and queer frameworks derived from Asian American contexts: immigration, labor, militarism, so-called “terrorism,” beauty, family, and movement-building. Through a mix of scholarly, creative, activist, literary, and media texts, we will challenge preconceived notions of Asian Americans as “model minorities,” repressed, politically regressive, or hyper-sexual, as well as explore the diversity of Asian American gender and sexuality offered within literature, film, performance, and culture.

 

SWG 241 – White Supremacy in the Age of Trump

Tuesday, Thursday  1:20-2:35 p.m.

Loretta June Ross

 

This course will analyze the history, prevalence, and current manifestations of the white supremacist movement by examining ideological components, tactics and strategies, and its relationship to mainstream politics. We will also research and discuss the relationship between white supremacy and white privilege, and explore how to build a human rights movement to counter the white supremacist movement in the U.S. Students will develop analytical writing and research skills, while engaging in multiple cultural perspectives. The overall goal is to develop the capacity to understand the range of possible responses to white supremacy, both its legal and extralegal forms.

 

SWG 305 – Queer Histories & Cultures

Thursday  1:20-4:00 p.m.

Kelly P. Anderson

 

This course is an introduction to the growing field of queer American history. Over the course of the semester, we will explore the historical emergence of same-sex desire, practice, and identity, as well as gender transgression, from the late 19th century to the present. Using a wide range of sources, including archival documents, films, work by historians, and oral histories, we will investigate how and why people with same-sex desire and non-normative gender expressions formed communities, struggled against bigotry, and organized movements for social and political change. This course will pay close attention to the intersections of race, gender, class, and sexuality and the ways that difference has shaped queer history. We will work in the Special Collections at Smith and Mt. Holyoke and the community-based Sexual Minorities Archive. Together we will contribute a project to the web-based archive outhistory.org.

 

AFR 202 – The Black Archive

Tuesday, Thursday  9:25-10:40 a.m.

Samuel Galen Ng

 

Why has the construction of archives that center on the experiences of people of African descent been so critical to black political, cultural, and social life? What do black archives look like and what do they offer us? How do they expand the way we consider archives in general? This course seeks to address these questions by examining the conception and development of black archives, primarily, although not exclusively, as they arose in the United States across the twentieth century.

 

AFR 249 – Black Women Writers

Monday, Wednesday  10:50-12:05 p.m.

Daphne M. Lamothe

 

How does gender matter in a black context? That is the question we will ask and attempt to answer through an examination of works by such authors as Harriet Jacobs, Frances Harper, Nella Larsen, Zora Hurston, Toni Morrison, Ntozake Shange and Alice Walker.

 

AFR 360/ENG 323 – Toni Morrison

Tuesday  1:20-4:00 p.m.

Flavia Santos De Araujo

 

This seminar focuses on Toni Morrison’s literary production. In reading her novels, essays, lectures and interviews, we pay particular attention to three things: her interest in the epic anxieties of American identities; her interest in form, language, and theory; and her study of love.

 

ANT 250 – The Anthropology of Reproduction

Tuesday, Thursday  1:20-2:35 p.m.

Suzanne K. Gottschang

 

This course uses anthropological approaches and theories to understand reproduction as a social, cultural and biological process. Drawing on cross-cultural studies of pregnancy and childbirth, new reproductive technologies, infertility and family planning, the course examines how society and culture shape biological experiences of reproduction. We also explore how anthropological studies and theories of reproduction intersect with larger questions about nature and culture, kinship and citizenship among others.

 

CLT 205 – 20th Century Literatures of Africa

Tuesday, Thursday 10:50-12:05 p.m.

Katwiwa Mule

 

A study of the major writers and diverse literary traditions of modern Africa with emphasis on the historical, political and cultural contexts of the emergence of writing, reception and consumption. We pay particular attention to several questions: in what contexts did modern African literature emerge? Is the term “African literature” a useful category? How do African writers challenge Western representations of Africa? How do they articulate the crisis of independence and postcoloniality? How do women writers reshape our understanding of gender and the politics of resistance? Writers include Chinua Achebe, Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Nadine Gordimer, Njabulo Ndebele and Ama Ata Aidoo. We also watch and critique films such as Blood Diamond, District 9, Tsotsi and The Constant Gardener.

 

EAL 242 – Modern Japanese Literature

Monday, Wednesday  2:45-4:00 p.m.

Kimberly Kono

 

A survey of Japanese literature from the late 19th century to the present. Over the last century and a half, Japan has undergone tremendous change: rapid industrialization, imperial and colonial expansion, occupation following its defeat in the Pacific War, and emergence as a global economic power. The literature of modern Japan reflects the complex aesthetic, cultural and political effects of such changes. Through our discussions of these texts, we also address theoretical questions about such concepts as identity, gender, race, sexuality, nation, class, colonialism, modernism and translation.  All readings are in English translation.

 

ENG 243 – The Victorian Novel

Tuesday, Thursday  9:25-10:40 a.m.

Cornelia D.J. Pearsall

 

An exploration of the worlds of the Victorian novel, from the city to the country, from the vast

reaches of empire to the minute intricacies of the drawing room. Attention to a variety of critical perspectives, with emphasis on issues of narrative form, authorial voice, and the representation of race, class, gender and disability. Novelists will include Brontë, Collins, Dickens, Eliot and Kipling.

 

ENG 323/AFR 360 – Toni Morrison

Tuesday 1:20-4:00 p.m.

Flavia Santos De Araujo

 

This seminar focuses on Toni Morrison’s literary production. In reading her novels, essays, lectures and interviews, we pay particular attention to three things: her interest in the epic anxieties of American identities; her interest in form, language and theory; and her study of love.

 

HST 252 – Women and Gender in Modern Europe, 1789-1918

Tuesday, Thursday  2:45-4:00 p.m.

Darcy C. Buerkle

 

A survey of European women’s experiences and constructions of gender from the French Revolution through World War I, focusing on Western Europe. Gendered relationships to work, family, politics, society, religion and the body, as well as shifting conceptions of femininity and masculinity, as revealed in novels, films, treatises, letters, paintings, plays and various secondary sources.

 

HST 263 – Women and Gender in Latin America

Monday, Wednesday  1:20-2:35 p.m.

Diana Sierra Becerra

 

This course will use gender as an analytical lens to understand key themes and periods of Latin American history, from the pre-Columbian era to present-day neoliberalism. Drawing from a variety of methodological approaches, the course will illuminate how gender has shaped social relationships, institutions, identities, and discourses in the region. It will prioritize the role of women and how their individual and collective actions have impacted Latin America. Special attention will be paid to the racial and class differences among women, and their social movement participation.

 

REL 227 – Women and Gender in Jewish History

Tuesday, Thursday  9:25-10:40 a.m.

Lois C. Dubin

 

An exploration of Jewish women’s changing social roles, religious stances and cultural expressions in a variety of historical settings from ancient to modern times. How did Jewish women negotiate religious tradition, gender and cultural norms to fashion lives for themselves as individuals and as family and community members in diverse societies? Readings from a wide range of historical, religious, theoretical and literary works in order to address examples drawn from Biblical and rabbinic Judaism, medieval Islamic and Christian lands, modern Europe, America and the Middle East. Students' final project involves archival work in the Sophia Smith Collection of Women's History.

 

 

REL 277 – South Asian Masculinities

Monday, Wednesday  1:20-2:35 p.m.

Andy N. Rotman

 

This course considers the role of religion in the construction of male identities in South Asia, and how these identities function in the South Asian public sphere. Topics to be considered include: Krishna devotion and transgender performance; the cinematic phenomenon of the “angry young man”; hijras and the construction of gender; wrestling and the politics of semen retention; and the connection between Lord Ram and the rise of militant Hindu nationalism.

 

SOC 213 – Race and National Identity in the United States

Monday, Wednesday  10:50-12:05 p.m.

Vanessa Mohr Adel

component

 

The sociology and history of a multiracial and ethnically stratified society. Comparative examinations of several U.S. racialized and ethnic groups.

 

SOC 229 – Sex and Gender in American Society

Monday, Wednesday  9:25-10:40 p.m.

William Cory Albertson

 

An examination of the ways in which the social system creates, maintains and reproduces gender dichotomies with specific attention to the significance of gender in interaction, culture and a number of institutional contexts, including work, politics, families and sexuality.

 

SOC 236 – Beyond Borders: The New Global Political Economy

Monday, Wednesday, Friday  1:20-2:35 p.m.

Payal Banerjee

 

This course introduces students to the basic concepts and theories in global political economy. It covers the history of economic restructuring, global division of labor, development, North-South state relations, and modes of resistance from a transnational and feminist perspective. Issues central to migration, borders and security, health, and the environment are central to the course.

 

SOC 239 – How Power Works

Monday, Wednesday  10:50-12:05 p.m.

Marc William Steinberg

 

This course focuses on a series of perspectives that examine the workings of power. These include Bourdieu, critical race, feminist, Foucault, Marxist, and post-structuralist and queer theories. The course spans the very micro-bases of social life, starting with the body, to the very macro-ending with the nation-state and the world system. On the macro side specific attention is given to the neoliberal state, including welfare and incarceration. In addition, the course focuses on several key institutions and spheres of social life, including education, media and culture, and work.

 

SOC 327 – Seminar: Global Migration in the 21st Century

Thursday  1:20-4:00 p.m.

Payal Banerjee

 

This seminar provides an in-depth engagement with global migration. It covers such areas as theories of migration, the significance of global political economy and state policies across the world in shaping migration patterns and immigrant identities. Questions about imperialism, post-colonial conditions, nation-building/national borders, citizenship, and the gendered racialization of immigration intersect as critical contexts for our discussions.

 

THE 319 – Shamans, Shapeshifters and the Magic If

Tuesday  1:20-4:00 p.m.

Andrea D. Hairston

 

To act, to perform is to speculate with your body. Theatre is a transformative experience that takes performer and audience on an extensive journey in the playground of the imagination beyond the mundane world. Theatre asks us to be other than ourselves. We can for a time inhabit someone else’s skin, be shaped by another gender or ethnicity, become part of a past epoch or an alternative time and space similar to our own time but that has yet to come. As we enter this “imagined” world we investigate the normative principles of our current world. This course investigates the counterfactual, speculative, subjunctive impulse in overtly speculative drama and film with a particular focus on race and gender. We examine an international range of plays by such authors as Caryl Churchill, Tess Onwueme, Dael Orlandersmith, Derek Walcott, Bertolt Brecht, Lorraine Hansberry, Craig Lucas and Doug Wright, as well as films such as The Curious Case of Benjamin Button; Pan’s Labyrinth; Children of Men.