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Fall 2017 Courses

 

WGSS 187 – Gender, Sexuality and Culture
Monday, Wednesday  10:10-11:00
Discussions, 9:05, 10:10 and 11:15
Laura Briggs

This course offers an introduction to some of the basic concepts and theoretical perspectives in Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies. Drawing on disciplinary, interdisciplinary and cross-cultural studies, students will engage critically with issues such as gender inequities, sexuality, families, work, media images, queer issues, masculinity, reproductive rights, and history. Throughout the course, students will explore how experiences of gender and sexuality intersect with other social constructs of difference, including race/ethnicity, class, and age. Special attention will be paid to the ways in which interlocking systems of oppression have shaped and influenced the historical, cultural, social, political, and economic contexts of our lives, and the social movements at the local, national and transnational levels which have led to key transformations. GenEd IU 4 credits

WGSS 191S – Scandal!  The Politics of the Sex Scandal
Monday, Wednesday, Friday  11:15-12:05 p.m.

Elizabeth Williams

Sex scandals have proven to be an enduring part of political discourse from the ancient times to the present. The first Roman Emperor, Augustus, exiled his daughter Julia after her philandering discredited his moral reforms; during the French Revolution, Marie Antoinette was accused of sleeping with men, women, and even her own son; and more recently, an unverified report from Buzzfeed involving Donald Trump and certain Moscow mattresses raised eyebrows and ire. Although sex scandals are often dismissed as lurid distractions from “real” political issues, in this course we will take them seriously as elements of political discourse. Through a close study of a number of political sex scandals, both past and present, students will consider the following questions: How and why are issues of sexuality morality tied to political legitimacy? Why is sex a useful discourse for expressing political discontent? How do issues of race, class, religion, and region influence the shape of sex scandals?

WGSS 201 – Gender and Difference:  Critical Analyses
1. Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.  - Stina Soderling
2. Monday, Wednesday  4:00-5:15 p.m. - Stina Soderling
3. Monday, Wednesday, Friday  10:10-11:00 a.m. - TBA

An introduction to the vibrant field of women, gender, and sexuality studies, this course familiarizes students with the basic concepts in the field and draws connections to the world in which we live. An interdisciplinary field grounded in commitment to both intellectual rigor and individual and social transformation, WGSS asks fundamental questions about the conceptual and material conditions of our lives. What are “gender,” “sexuality,” “race,” and “class”? How are gender categories, in particular, constructed differently across social groups, nations, and historical periods? What are the connections between gender and socio-political categories such as race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, (dis)ability and others? How do power structures such as sexism, racism, heterosexism, and classism and others intersect? How can an understanding of gender and power enable us to act as agents of individual and social change? Emphasizing inquiry in transnational feminisms, critical race feminisms, and sexuality studies, this course examines gender within a broad nexus of identity categories, social positions, and power structures. Areas of focus may include queer and trans studies; feminist literatures and cultures; feminist science studies; reproductive politics; gender, labor and feminist economics, environmental and climate justice; the politics of desire, and others. Readings include a range of queer, feminist and women thinkers from around the world, reflecting diverse and interdisciplinary perspectives in the field.

WGSS 230 – Politics of Reproduction
Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Julietta Chaparro Buitrago
Distribution requirement:  Sexuality Studies

From the Black Panther Party and Young Lords in the 1970s to SisterSong and Asian Communities for Reproductive Justice in the 1990s to Ferguson and Familia: Trans Queer Liberation Movement in the present, communities of color and socialist feminists have fought for a comprehensive reproductive freedom platform--birth control and abortion to be sure, but also the right to raise wanted children that are safe, cherished, and educated. The names of these issues have included freedom from sterilization, high quality affordable day care, IVF, immigrant justice, social reproduction and wages for housework, welfare and neoliberalism, foreclosure and affordable housing.

WGSS 292F – Black Feminist Literature
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Carlyn Ferrari
Distribution requirement:  Critical Race Feminisms, Transnational Feminisms

This course will explore a rich array of canonical and contemporary texts that highlight the nuances of Black Feminisms and analyze the strategies Black women use to articulate their lived experiences. This course explores the implications of gender, race, class, sexuality and other social differentiators on the lives of Black women. While an emphasis is placed on the U.S., the course is global in scope and will consider writings from African-descended women throughout the Diaspora.  Some questions we will consider include: What constitutes a Black Feminist literature? How do Black women theorize their lived experiences? 

WGSS 293M – Perspectives on Masculinity
Thursday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Tom Schiff

This course is an introduction to the study of men and masculinities. We will explore what it means to study masculinities from varying perspectives. In addition, we will utilize an intersectional approach to explore men's gender role socialization over the life span focused on men's developmental issues, gender role conflicts, and the impact of systems on the behavior and experiences of men and boys. Theory, research, and personal exploration are integrated through lectures, discussions, and learning activities.

WGSS 293S – Immigration and Settler Colonialism
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Stina Soderling
Distribution requirement:  Critical Race Feminisms, Transnational Feminisms

Recent months have seen an upsurge in attention to, and activism around, immigration in and to the United States. At pro-immigration rallies, rhetoric of "We are all immigrants" are paired with singing "This Land Is Your Land, This Land Is My Land." But are we all immigrants? And whose land is this actually? This course will pair a feminist study of immigration with theories of settler-colonialism; that is, the study of North America as Indigenous land settled by (predominantly European) colonizers. Questions asked in the course include: How are feminists engaging with questions of immigration and dispossession? What are different theories of colonialism? When are immigrant and Native movements in conflict, and when do they work together? We will read scholarly texts, news sources, and social movement literature. With growing and ongoing struggles around both immigration and Native justice, we will also study contemporary activism, especially in the "Pioneer Valley."

WGSS 295P – Policing, Protest and Politics:  Queer, Feminisms, and #BlackLivesMatter
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Lezlie Frye
Distribution requirement:  Critical Race Feminisms, Sexuality Studies

Over the past year few years, a powerful social movement has emerged to affirm to the country and world that Black Lives Matter. Sparked by the killing of Trayvon Martin by George Zimmerman in Stanford, Florida, and Zimmerman’s acquittal as well as the police killings of other black men and women, including Michael Brown, Rekia Boyd, and Freddie Gray, this movement challenges police violence and other policing that makes black communities unsafe as well as social constructions of black people as inherently dangerous and criminal. Police violence against black people and the interrelated criminalization of black communities have a long history, older than the US itself. There is a similarly long and important history of activism and social movements against police violence and criminalization. Today, black people are disproportionately subject to police surveillance and violence, arrest, and incarceration. So, too, are other people of color (both men and women) and queer, trans, and gender nonconforming people of all races but especially those of color. This course will examine the history of policing and criminalization of black, queer, and trans people and communities and related anti-racist, feminist, and queer/trans activism. In doing so, we will interrogate how policing and understandings of criminality - or the view that certain people or groups are inherently dangerous or criminal - in the US have long been deeply shaped by race, gender, and sexuality.

WGSS 297TC – Introduction to Transgender Studies
Tuesday, Thursday 4:00-5:15 p.m.
Sonny Nordmarken
Distribution requirement:  Sexuality Studies

This course will introduce students to the epistemologies and analyses of the field of transgender studies. We will investigate the following questions. How do processes of knowledge-production and regimes of gender, racism, colonization, ableism, empire, medical and legal regulation, and social interaction work to simultaneously produce, police, and erase trans and gender nonconforming bodies? How do cultural assumptions of sex as fixed and binary shape interpretive frames and thus policies, institutions, administrative systems and social practices that trans people must negotiate? How do trans and gender nonconforming people resist normatization, misrepresentation, and erasure? Through active engagement, we will build a critical analytical framework around contemporary trans politics and theory.

WGSS 310 – Writing for WGSS Majors
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Katelyn Litterer

Fulfills Junior Year Writing requirement for majors. Modes of writing and argumentation useful for research, creative, and professional work in a variety of fields. Analysis of texts, organization of knowledge, and uses of evidence to articulate ideas to diverse audiences. Includes materials appropriate for popular and scholarly journal writing. Popular culture reviews, responses to public arguments, monographs, first-person narratives and grant proposals, and a section on archival and bibliographic resources in WGSS. May include writing for the Internet. Non-majors admitted if space available.

WGSS 391D/JUDAIC 383– Women, Gender, Judaism
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Susan Shapiro

Historically, the figure of the “Jew” has been thought of as male.  Making male experience normative has in turn shaped how Judaism itself has been understood.  Shifting the basic terms and focus to include attention to women, gender, and sexuality significantly re-shapes our understanding of both Judaism and of Jewish culture/history.   This course not only “fills in the blanks” of the missing women of Jewish history and tradition, but attends to questions of contemporary forms of Jewish women's and men’s gendered lives, identities and sexualities.   Beginning with the Bible, the course proceeds historically, concluding with contemporary views of and debates surrounding matters of gender and sexuality.

Cancelled
WGSS 391R – Race, Sexuality, and Imperialism
Monday, Wednesday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
Elizabeth Williams

From the late 1400s, Europe embarked on program of conquering and colonizing wide swaths of the globe. As the institutions of slavery and imperialism developed, new ideas about racial and sexual identities developed to facilitate European ambitions. Colonial powers sought  to control reproduction, regulate interracial sex, and police sexual mores and practices. Meanwhile, Europeans like the dancer and spy Mata Hari (pictured above) enacted fantasies of “exotic” sexualities. This course will consider how racial and sexual identities developed in tandem. Students will learn how ideas about race and sex facilitated colonial projects, as well as how colonized peoples reclaimed these discourses to enact resistance. We will also consider how race and sexuality continue to influence transnational relationships today, through processes like tourism, the “war on terror,” and global GLBTQ rights organizations.

WGSS 393A/693A – Reading Audre Lorde
Wednesday  2:30-5:00 P.M.
Angie Willey  Elizabeth Williams
Distribution requirement:  Critical Race Feminisms, Sexuality Studies

Deeply committed to both embodiment and politics in her writing, Audre Lorde - self-described black lesbian feminist mother warrior poet - is among those whose work has been variously claimed as both “essentialist” and “antiessentialist” (as either supporting or challenging biologically reductionist accounts of experience). As such a border figure, she has allowed us to tend to the power of both bodies and politics without placing them in hierarchical relation as causal elements in the making of our realities. Lorde’s erotic, like her anger, and her engagements with illness and pain, provide resources for holding our analyses of embodiment accountable to our critical engagements with culture and history and vice versa. Together we will read Lorde and readings of her work to explore her legacies as a scholar of bodies-in-context. What sorts of body knowledges does Lorde’s writing suggest are needed and undervalued? How can Lorde’s rich and diverse approaches to embodiment help us think about politics, desire, justice, health, ethics, resistance, and what it might mean to live a feminist life here and now?

WGSS 394H – Critical Race Feminisms
Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Alexandrina Deschamps
Distribution requirement:  Critical Race Feminisms

This course will explore the intersection of race and gender and other components of social identity from an interdisciplinary perspective. It will address and respond to the unique challenges of the inter and intra relationships of women of color with feminism, locally and globally. One of the tasks will be to (re)-visit, (re)-vision, (re)-counter existing theories and bodies of knowledge, as well as analyze how historical and contemporary realities of women of color are profoundly influenced by a legacy of structural inequalities that is neither linear nor logical. The approach to this course will be to pay particular attention to critical analysis and the importance of understanding and applying knowledge - not just "knowing". We will explore a range of activist practices of resistance and their practical applications. By the end of the semester students should be able to have mastered arguments regarding a number of Critical Race Feminist themes and issues with sensitivity, eloquence, and grounded analysis.  This course fulfills the theory requirement for majors and the critical race feminisms distribution requirement.  Please note:  one course does not count towards two requirements.  Prerequisite WGSS 201 or 301 or any other 200 level or above WGSS course.  Permission of instructor needed for others.  Contact department for more information. 

WGSS 395F – Feminism, Comedy and Humor
Monday 4:00-6:15 p.m.
Kirsten Leng

The popularity of shows like Inside Amy Schumer and Broad City and the clout of performers such as Tina Fey, Amy Poehler, and Wanda Sykes have arguably put to rest the old stereotype that women aren't funny.  More importantly, they have all shown that comedy and humor can be vehicles for feminist messages.  In so doing, they have built upon a legacy established by performers, writers, directors, and activists extending back to feminism's "first wave."  In this course, we will examine the intersections of feminism, comedy, and humor, and will explore questions such as: Why and how have feminists used humor and comedy for political ends?  Why have feminists, and women more generally, been seen as inherently unfunny?  In what ways is comedy and humor gendered?  What roles do race, class, and sexuality play?  And is humor and comedy available to all feminists, and to all feminist causes, or do the stakes and effects vary according to one’s social position and subject matter?  In addition to analyzing a wide range of media, we will create and explore our own forms of feminist comedic interventions.

WGSS 395D – Introduction to Feminist Disability Studies
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Lezlie Frye

What is the relationship between sexuality and disability? How did we come to know and feel what we think we know and feel about these intersecting realms of knowledge and lived experience? U.S. cultural ideals of beauty, youth, fitness, strength, skinniness, sex appeal, social skill, mental acuity, and (most elusive) "health" all rely on norms of ablebodiedness, heterosexuality, and whiteness. We will thus approach disability and sexuality not as fixed or singular categories, but as fluid, historically shifting, culturally-specific formations that intersect with race, class, gender, language, and nation. How do some bodies, minds, and psyches as well as sexual acts, desires, relationships, and identities come to be seen as deviant and others as normal? What are the national and transnational conditions or relations of power that form the context for these processes? Which cultural institutions have historically disciplined disabled, queer, and gender-non-conforming subjects? What legacies of resistance might we find in various forms of art and cultural production; in feminist and queer coalitions, activism and movements for Health or Fat Justice, and for disability, racial and economic justice; and in scholarship including LGBT and Disability Studies? Where can we look for models of queer kinship, care collectives, and "alternative" familial and community structures based on practices of interdependence? We will approach these questions through a range of critical essays, books, films, artwork, and community engagement, working together to queer and crip - or further trouble - contemporary epistemologies of sexuality and disability.

WGSS 397R/WGSS 697R – The Romances, Rhetorics, and Realities of Women and Sustainability
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Kiran Asher
Distribution requirement:  Transnational Feminisms

The 2014 United Nations Survey Report on the role of women in development makes a strong case for linking gender equality and sustainable development.  Neither concerns about gender equality nor sustainability are new, but are re-emerging as part of the post-2015 sustainable development agenda. This class examines perceived and existing links between economic development, women, and gender from various perspectives. Informed by feminist theories of power and politics we will engage with the following questions: How did concerns about "third world women" enter discussions about international development and social change? How have feminists concerned with gender and power explained and addressed the roles and needs of “third world women?” How have concerns over women and gender been adopted/adapted by development institutions and interventions, and with what results?  What role are women and gender playing in environmental debates about climate change, food security, etc. How have women across the world organized to address their concerns, and with what results?  This upper-level course invites an understanding of the racialized and gendered dimensions of persistent social, economic and political inequalities. We will strive to reject the many binaries (theory-practice, men-women, structure-agency, etc) that plague the gender and development field and aim for a self-reflexive solidarity with feminist struggles for social change.  Undergraduates should have taken a 200 or 300 level course in WGSS or economic development.

WGSS 693A/393A – Reading Audre Lorde
Wednesday  2:30-5:00 P.M.
Angie Willey  Elizabeth Williams

See WGSS 393A for description. 

WGSS 697R/WGSS 397R – The Romances, Rhetorics, and Realities of Women and Sustainability
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Kiran Asher

See WGSS 397R for description.  Students are expected to have some prior grounding (through course work or self-study) in economic development, and feminist approaches to gender.

WGSS 791B – Feminist Theory
Tuesday  1:00-3:30 p.m.
Kiran Asher

This graduate seminar in feminist theory constitutes a core course for students enrolled in the Graduate Certificate in Advanced Feminist Studies. The seminar will be organized around questions that emerge for feminisms from the rubrics of gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality, transnationalism, human rights, economics and postcolonialism.  Feminist theory is inherently interdisciplinary and we will draw on classic and contemporary writings from the many fields that contribute to the "field."  This is a required course for students enrolled in the Certificate in Advanced Feminist Studies.  Contact Linda Hillenbrand to add the course lindah@umass.edu.

UMASS CRF TNF SS
WGSS 191S - Scandal!  The Politics of the Sex Scandal   X X
WGSS 230 – Politics of Reproduction
  X X

WGSS 292F – Black Feminist Literature

X X  

WGSS 294D – Immigration and Settler Colonialism

X X  
WGSS 295P – Policing, Protest and Politics:  Queer, Feminisms, and #BlackLivesMatter X   X
WGSS 297TC - Introduction to Critical Transgender Studies     X

WGSS 393A/693A – Reading Audre Lorde

X   X

WGSS 394H – Critical Race Feminisms

*This course fulfills the theory requirement for majors as well as the critical race feminisms distribution requirement.  Please note:  one course does not count towards two requirements
X    

WGSS 397R/WGSS 697R – The Romances, Rhetorics, and Realities of Women and Sustainability

  X  

AFROAM 330 – Songbirds, Blueswomen, Soulwomen

X    

ANTHRO 224 – Gender in Hip Hop Culture

X    

ANTHRO 494BI – Global Bodies

    X

CHINESE 394WI – Women in Chinese Cultures

  X  

COMM 290AH – Media, Public Opinion, and LGBT Rights

    X
ECON 397LG - Economics of LGBT Issues     X
HISTORY 265 – U.S. LGBT and Queer History     X

HISTORY 349H – Topics in European History:  Sex and Society

    X
HISTORY 397RL – Rape Law:  Gender, Race, (In)justice X    

PSYCH 391ZZ – Psychology of the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual Experience

    X
SOCIOL – Sexuality and Society     X
 
UMASS CPE - SUMMER 2017 CRF TNF SS
WGSS 205 – Feminist Health Politics     X
AMHERST COLLEGE CRF TNF SS
SWAG 246/BLST 246 – Introduction to Black Girlhood Studies  X    
SWAG 300/BLST 236 – Black Sexualities X   X
SWAG 347/BLST 347 – Race, Sex and Gender in the U.S. Military X    
SWAG 400 – Contemporary Debates: Women and Right-Wing Populism   X  
HAMPSHIRE COLLEGE CRF TNF SS
CSI 161 – Black Girlhood Studies X    
CSI 208 – Queer Feelings:  The Emotional and Affective Life of Gender, Sexuality and Race     X
CSI 279 – Feminist, Queer, and Trans Theories of Race X   X
HACU 221 – The Regulation of Race, Sex, and Disability in the U.S X   X
MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE CRF TNF SS
GNDST 204 – Androgyny and Gender Negotiation in Chinese Theater   X  
GNDST 204TR - Trans* Identities and Communities: Genealogy, Theory, Praxis and Community Research X   X
GNDST 240RP – Race, Racism, and Power X    
GNDST 221QF – Feminist and Queer Theory
    X
GNDST 241 HP – Feminist Health Politics
    X
GNDST 333BT – The Body Toxic: Narratives of Race, Disability and Illness X    
GNDST 333EG – Eggs and Embryos:  Innovations in Reproductive and Genetic Technologies’     X
GNDST 333GS – Gender and Sexual Minority Health     X
GNDST 333NT/CST 349 - Entangled Sexuality: Violence, Resistance, Crime, Punishment And Survival X   X
GNDST 333SA – Women and Gender in Modern South Asia   X  
GNDST 333MC – Latina/os/x and Housing:  Mi Casa is Not Su Casa X    
GNDST 333UU - Latina/o Immigration X    
SMITH COLLEGE CRF TNF SS
SWG 200 – The Queer 90’s
    X
SWG 204 – This Bridge Called me Back:  Women of Color Cultural Production X    
SWG 324 – Queering Displacement:  Race, Sexuality and Space X   X
AFR 360/ENG 323 – Toni Morrison
X    
CLT 204 – Queering Don Quixote
    X
CLT 239/EAL 239 – Intimacy in Contemporary Chinese Women’s Fiction   X  
ENG 391 – Modern South Asian Writers in English
  X  
FRN 380 – Immigration and Sexuality
X X  
HST 238 - Gender and the British Empire
  X  
HST 265 – Race, Gender and United States Citizenship, 1776-1861 X    
HST 280 – Globalization, Im/migration and Transnational Cultures X X  
HST 371 – Remembering Slavery:  A Gendered Reading of the WPA Slave Interviews X    
HST 252 – Women and Gender in Modern Europe, 1789-1918
  X  
IDP 320 – Women’s Health in India, Including Tibetans Living in Exile   X  
SOC 236 – Beyond Borders:  The New Global Political Economy   X  
SPP 230 – Maghribi Jewish Women: Cordoba, Casablanca, Tel Aviv   X  
SPN 250 – Sex and the Medieval City   X X
THE 221 – Rehearsing the Impossible:  Black Women Playwrights Interrupting the Master Narrative X    

AFROAM 326 – Black Women in U.S. History
Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Traci Parker

The history of African American women from the experience of slavery to the present. Emphasis on the effect of racist institutions and practices on women. The ways in which women organized themselves to address the needs of African Americans in general and their own in particular. The achievements of such leaders as Mary Church Terrell, Harriet Tubman, Ella Baker, and Mary McLeod Bethune as well as lesser known women.  (Gen.Ed. HS, U, 3 credits)

AFROAM 330 – Songbirds, Blueswomen, Soulwomen
Thursday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
A Yemisi Jimoh

The focus for this course is the cultural, political, and social issues found in the music and history of African American women performers. The primary emphasis in the course will be on African American women in Jazz, Blues, and Soul/R&B, but students also will study African American women composers as well as Spiritual-Gospel and Opera performers.

ANTHRO 205 – Inequality and Oppression
Monday, Wednesday 10:10-11:00 a.m.
Discussions Thursday 10:10, 11:15 and 2:30 and Friday 10:10, 11:15 and 2:30

The roots of racism and sexism and the issues they raise. The cultural, biological, and social contexts of race and gender and examination of biological variation, genetic determinism, human adaptation, and the bases of human behavior. (Gen Ed SB, U)

ANTHRO 224 – Gender in Hip Hop culture
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Whitney Battle-Baptiste

This course will critically examine issues of race, representation and the sexual politics of hip- hop culture. We will trace the historical implications of race and gender in U. S. culture from slavery onwards and connect how past images of African Americans continue to influence contemporary notions of Black identity. We will trace the early historical moments of the hip- hop movement in order to understand how the culture became synonymous with male dominated spaces and silent women. This course will also explore the role of misogyny, sexual exploitation, and hypermasculinity in current rap music and contrast this with the rise of independent artists challenging and reshaping hip-hop music today. Ultimately, we will look at the role of the internet and alternative forms of media as a means of how hip-hop has moved from the board room to the global stage, giving the power back to the people.

ANTHRO 397LG – Language, Gender & Sexuality
Monday, Wednesday, Friday   12:20-1:10 p.m.
TBA

This course will consider how cross-cultural studies of language and language ideologies can challenge our received notions of what gender is and how language, gender, and sexuality are interconnected. Among the topics covered are: institutional language and power; gender identity and language use;  cultural definitions of "masculinity" and "femininity" and their relationship to language use; sexual orientation and linguistic expression; and the social construction and expression of sexual and gender identities through linguistic performance.

ANTHRO 494BI – Global Bodies
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Elizabeth Krause

The human body has increasingly become an object of anthropological study. The body is rich as a site of meaning and materiality. Similarly, culture inscribes itself on the body in terms of ?normalization? and governance. This course will explore pertinent issues surrounding the body today. Topics such as personhood, natural vs. artificial bodies, identity and subjectivity (nationality, race, class, sex, gender), domination and marginalization, and policy will be discussed. We will focus on the body in three main stages: birth, life, and death, with relevant case studies in each stage (e.g., embryos, reproduction, breastfeeding, organs, immigrant bodies, etc.) The course has a digital ethnography component as a final project option. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Anth majors.

ANTHRO 497FE – Feminist Ethnography
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Amanda Johnson

Through studies, testimony, and reflection, this course will examine the history, practice (or praxis), and challenges of feminist ethnography. We will read examples not only of feminist ethnographies that are widely reconginized, but also those that tend to be marginalized due to layers of economic, racialized, national, and global processes. Ethnographic projects and assignments will reflect tenets in feminist anthropology.

CHINESE 394WI – Women in Chinese Cultures
Tuesday, Thursday 10:00-11:15 a.m.
Elena Chiu

This course focuses on the representation of women and the constitution of gender in Chinese culture as seen through literature and mass media. It focuses on literary and visual representations of women to examine important issues such as the relationship between gender and power, self and society, and tradition and modernity. This course has a dual goal: to explore how women's social role has evolved from pre-modern China to the present and to examine important issues such as women's agency, "inner-outer" division, and the yin-yang dichotomy in Chinese literature and culture. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Chinse majors.

CLASSICS 335 – Women in Antiquity
Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Teresa Ramsby

Lives, roles, contributions, and status of women in Greek and Roman societies, as reflected in classical literature and the archaeological record.  (Gen.Ed. HS)

COMM 271 – Humor in Society
Monday, Wednesday 1:25 – 2:15 p.m.
Discussions Friday 10:10, 11:15, 12:20 and 1:25
Stephen Olbrys Gencarella

This course examines humor as a significant form of creative expression in social and political life, especially as it negotiates issues of race, gender, class, ethnicity, and sexual orientation. This course also introduces students to the burgeoning field of humor studies. Topics include the different theories of humor, the relationship between humor and creativity, the political use of humor, the role of humor in maintaining personal and social identity, and the social aspects of laughter. Although the focus lies on contemporary humor in U.S. American society and media, the course also examines different cultural perspectives on the humorous. (GenEd SB, U)  This course was formerly numbered COMM 297C.  If you have already taken COMM 297C you cannot take this course.  Instructor Consent Required

COMM 290AH – Media, Public Opinion, and LGBT Rights
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Seth Goldman

This course aims to further understanding about 1) historical trends in media portrayals and public opinion about LGBT issues; 2) the effects of mass media on attitudes toward sexual and gender minorities; 3) the interplay of LGBT issues and electoral politics; and 4) the evolving role of sexuality and gender identity/expression in U.S. politics and society. (Gen. Ed. SB, U)

ECON 397LG - Economics of LGBT Issues
Monday, Wednesday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
M.V. Lee Badgett

The economic, social, and legal position of LGBT people has changed very rapidly, but LGBT people still face economic inequality.  This course explores that position from the the perspective of economics an dpolicy, both in the U.S. and globally.  What causes employment discrimination against LGBT people?  Can economic reasoning reduce anti-gay prejudice?  Are LGBT families different?  Why and how? How do public politics shape economic inequality for LGBT people? How do businesses gain from LGBT equality?  How can LGBT equality increase economic development?  How does the economy influence changes in LGBT rights in other parts of the world?

ENGLISH 132 – Gender, Sexuality, Literature, and Culture
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 11:15-12:15 p.m.
Emily Campbell

Literature treating the relationship between man and woman. Topics may include: the nature of love, the image of the hero and heroine, and definitions, past and present, of the masculine and feminine.  (Gen.Ed. AL, G)

ENGLISH 132 – Gender, Sexuality, Literature, and Culture
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 12:20-1:10 p.m.
Matthew Donlevy

This course will charge students with critically engaging a long history of the de/re-construction of American masculinity.  We will trace the development of various masculine identities and idealities across the Nineteenth century, and place them in conversation with current lived realities.    Students will engage with texts ranging from a nascent portraiture to fashion advertisements, and from labor songs to utopian prose.  We will interrogate the emergence of a working class eroticized body, and the consequences of this in regards to bourgeois masculine self-conceptualizations.  We will trace the role Black masculinity played in influencing both working class and bourgeois masculinities even as being influenced in turn.  We will do so much more.  This will be a discussion driven course with a significant reading load.  However, each of the texts we engage will leave you  wishing you could erase it from your mind and start again.  This class welcomes all members of our academic community that are prepared roll up their sleeves and genuinely interrogate discourses that worked to establish some viable masculinities while negating, often through force, others.Gen.Ed. AL, G)

ENGLISH 132 – Gender, Sexuality, Literature, and Culture
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10:10-11:00 a.m.
Korka Sall

This course will examine gender, sexuality and culture in literature from the African Diaspora. We will look at gender norms and how they are represented, challenged, or questioned in the African Diaspora literature and the Global South by tracing the social construction of gender, the performativity of gender, the image of the hero and heroine. Examining and discussing gender, sexuality, literature and culture will help us develop a better understanding of social norms and how they impact different cultures and readers.  Through novels, books, film, music, poetry, essay and articles by artists and writers from the African Diaspora, we will focus on the different representations of masculinity and femininity in literature but also the definitions of sexuality and their effects on the societies of the African Diaspora. Some of the questions this course will discuss include How do colonial and post-colonial thoughts, literature and discussions shape gender, sexuality, literature and culture? How do female and male writers from the African Diaspora reinforce, challenge or question gender norms in literature? What is the image of the hero and heroine and how is it represented in literature? To what extend does the choice of the writers and artists reflect the performativity of masculinity and femininity? Authors may include Suzanne Cesaire, Mariama Ba, Ama Ata Aidoo, Aime Cesaire, Chinua Achebe, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Leopold Sedar Senghor, among others. (Gen.Ed. AL,G)

GERMAN 363 – Witches: Myth and Reality
Monday, Wednesday, Friday  1:25-2:15 p.m.
Kerstin Mueller Dembling

This course focuses on various aspects of witches/witchcraft in order to examine the historical construction of the witch in the context of the social realities of women (and men) labeled as witches.  The main areas covered are:  European pagan religions and the spread of Christianity; the "Burning Times" in early modern Europe, with an emphasis on the German situation; 17th-century New England and the Salem witch trials; the images of witches in folk lore and fairy tales in the context of the historical persecutions; and contemporary Wiccan/witch practices in their historical context.  The goal of the course is to deconstruct the stereotypes that many of us have about witches/witchcraft, especially concerning sexuality, gender, age, physical appearance, occult powers, and Satanism.  Readings are drawn from documentary records of the witch persecutions and witch trials, literary representations, scholarly analyses of witch-related phenomena, and essays examining witches, witchcraft, and the witch persecutions from a contemporary feminist or neo-pagan perspective.  The lectures will be supplemented by related material taken from current events in addition to visual material (videos, slides) drawn from art history, early modern witch literature, popular culture, and documentary sources.  Conducted in English.  (Gen Ed. I, G)

HISTORY 190S – Sex in History
Tuesday, Thursday 8:30-9:20 a.m.
Discussions Friday, 9:05, 10:10, 12:20
Laura Lovett

This course will survey topics in the global history of sex and sexuality from the eighteenth to the twenty-first century. We will explore continuities and changes in the definitions of sex and sexualities, the science and politics of sex and reproduction, the relationships between sex, sexuality, and imperialism, the sexual construction of social and cultural differences in different countries, changing portrayals of sex and sexuality by the state and by the media, social and legal activism with regard to issues of sex and sexuality, and the value of using sex and sexuality as a historical framework for issues in social, cultural, and political history. No prerequisites.  (Gen. Ed. HS, G)

HISTORY 265 – U.S. LGBT and Queer History
Tuesday, Thurday  10:00-10:50 a.m.
Discussions Friday 9:05, 10:10, 12:20
Julio Capo

This course explores how queer individuals and members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) communities have influenced the social, cultural, economic, and political landscape in United States history. With a focus on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the course covers topics such as the criminalization of same-sex acts, cross-dressing, industrialization and urbanization, feminism, the construction of the homo/heterosexual binary, transsexuality and the "lavender scare" during the Cold War, the homophile, gay liberation, and gay rights movements, HIV/AIDS, and (im)migration. We will often look to examples from the present to better explore change over time and the modes and influences that shape both current and past understandings of gender and sexual difference. (Gen. Ed. HS, U)

HISTORY 349H – Topics in European History:  Sex and Society
Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Jennifer Heuer

This honors course examines the social organization and cultural construction of gender and sexuality.  We will look at how women and men experienced the dramatic changes that have affected Europe since 1789 and consider how much these developments were themselves influenced by ideas about masculinity and femininity.  We will explore topics such as revolutionary definitions of citizenship; changing patterns of work and family life; fin-de-siecle links between crime, madness, and sexual perversion; the fascist cult of the body; battle grounds and home fronts during the world wars; gendered aspects of nationalism and European colonialism, and the sexual revolution of the post-war era.

HISTORY 395S/POLISCI 395S – History of U.S. Social Policy, Politics of Gender, Race, and Class
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Elizabeth Sharrow

What are the problems associated with developing equitable and just policy?  Why does social policy in the United States continue to be marked by tensions between the principle of equality and the reality of inequalities in social, political, and economic realms?  How might policy subvert or reinforce these differences and inequalities?  This class examines the history of social policy in the United States, particularly those policies affecting concerns of gender, race, and class.  We will examine a wide range of social policies, focusing on those affecting groups such as: women, racial and ethnic minorities, LGBT people, and low-income people.  We will study primarily empirical work, while asking questions about how political culture, interest groups, social movements, government institutions and other factor influence U.S. social policy.

HISTORY 397RL – Rape Law:  Gender, Race, (In)justice
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Jennifer Nye

The history of the legal response to rape has often resulted in injustice for both the victim/survivor and the alleged perpetrator.  This course will examine the evolution of the U.S. legal system's treatment of rape, paying particular attention to the movement against lynching in the post-civil war era, the rise of the feminist anti-rape movement in the 1970s and the student movement against campus sexual assault.  Through an analysis of court cases, legislation, and other texts we will consider the role sexual violence has played in maintaining gender and racialized power relationships.  We will examine how and why such violence came to be seen as a crime, including who is worthy of the law's "protection" and who is subject to the law's punishment. We will explore issues such as:  rape as a form of racialized and imperial violence, especially against black and Native American women; the criminal legal treatment of rape and the evolution of the legal concepts of force, resistance, and consent; and the civil responses to rape under the Violence Against Women Act and Title IX.  We'll also look at the international law responses to rape as a weapon of war.  Finally, we'll think about how the legal responses, or non-responses, to rape have differed over time depending on factors such as the race/ethnicity, income level, immigration status, sexual orientation/gender identity, age, and marital status of the victim/survivor and the perpetrator.  Finally, we’ll consider how the legal system can or should respond to rape, particularly in this age of mass criminalization and mass incarceration, and whether restorative justice responses might be preferable.  Prior law-related coursework is helpful, but not required.

HISTORY 397WLH – Women and the Law:  History of Sex and Gender Discrimination
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Jennifer Nye

Using legal history and legal theory, this course will examine the legal treatment of women in the United States, focusing specifically on the 20th and 21st centuries. We will explore the ways the law has used the categories of gender, sex, sexuality, and race to legally enforce inequality between women and men (and among women). We will also explore the potential for “the law” to be a liberating force. Finally, we will look at ways women have used the law to advocate for social and legal equality and justice.  Specific issues that may be explored include the civil and political participation of women, employment, intimate relationships, reproduction and contraception, violence against women, women as criminal defendants, and women as law students, lawyers, and judges.  This course will require extensive reading of court decisions and law review articles, the completion of on-going reflection essays responding to course readings and class discussions, and the completion of a significant final research paper.  Prior law-related coursework is helpful, but not required.

HPP 590F - Food Insecurity, Climat Change, and Women's Resilience in the Developing World
Monday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Janis Steele

Climate change, extractive economies of scale, and population shifts are compounding the collapse of biocultural diversity around the world.  Rural communities in developing countries are increasingly vulnerable: the loss of natural resources upon which these communities rely so closely, and the erosion of traditional ecological knowledge are threatening their food and water security.  This course will take a multi-disciplinary approach to this topic, with a focus on the importance of mainstreaming gender.  The health, security, and resilience of women and children are disproportionately affected by  the risks posed by climate change, natural disasters, and the degradation of natural resources.  Rather than just telling a tale of doom and gloom, however, we would devote attention to ways communities, and particularly women at the grassroots level, are crafting powerful actions and alliances, and innovative solutions in the face of challenges. Tools and methodologies that can be applied in fieldwork, especially participatory learning and participatory media, will be explored. The course is of value to students interested in the intersection of health, development, gender, climate change and natural resource management.

JAPANESE 135 – Japanese Art and Culture
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Stephen Forrest

Exploration of Japan's secular and religious arts and their impact on gendered literary texts, such as early aristocratic women's writings and medieval warrior epics. Films about the traditional theater, which influenced the culture of sexuality, and about the Zen-inspired art of the tea ceremony, which reflected political upheaval. Locating points of intersection between art and literature, religion and politics in modern Japan under Western influence. Conducted in English. No prerequisites.  (Gen.Ed. I, G)

JUDAIC 318 – Family and Sexuality in Jewish History and Culture
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Jay Berkovitz

An examination of transformations in the Jewish family and attitudes toward sexuality in Judaism, from antiquity to the present.  Topics include love, sexuality, and desire in the Bible and Talmud; marriage and divorce through the ages; position and treatment of children; sexuality and spirituality in the Kabbalah; sexual stereotypes in American Jewish culture and Israeli society.  Interdisciplinary readings draw on biblical and rabbinic literature, comparative Christian and Islamic sources, historical and scientific research on family and sexuality, and contemporary fiction.

JUDAIC 383/WGSS 391D – Women, Gender, Judaism
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Susan Shapiro

This course focuses on the shifting historical constructions (from biblical to contemporary times) of women's and men's gender roles in Judaism and their cultural and social consequences.

PHIL 391G – Philosophy of Gender
Monday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Eileen O’Neill

We will examine important texts from the Middle Ages through the French and American Revolutions, which focus on such questions as: How did philosophers theorize gender difference? Did they hold that men’s greater physical power justified their subordination of women in society?  Were there theological arguments for men’s subordination of women?  How were these arguments criticized? What were the arguments against the education of women, and how were these arguments criticized?  How did human cognitive abilities, such as sense, imagination, and reason, come to be “gendered?”  Did women typically not take part in the Enlightenment project of scientific inquiry because it was thought they were more deficient in reason than men? Which social roles were deemed appropriate for women, and why?  Which were deemed appropriate for men, and why?  Was it held that the virtues are the same for men and women, or was it argued that there are specifically feminine and masculine virtues? 

POLISCI 392 AP – Activism, Participation and Protest
Tuesday, Thursday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
Sonia Alvarez

This course examines historical and contemporary modalities of political activism, participation, and protest. Through the comparative analysis select case studies, principally from Latin America, the U.S, and Europe, we will explore the dynamic development of feminisms, LGBTQ organizing, anti-racist/Black mobilizations, and contemporary anti-austerity and pro-democracy protests.

POLISCI 395F – Women and Politics
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Maryann Barakso

Women have made tremendous gains in every aspect of social, economic and political life in the United States, particularly since the second wave of the women's movement in the 1960s.  Yet, women's progress in terms of achieving elected office has reached a puzzling plateau since the 1990s.  We will examine the course of women's movements towards achieving political incorporation in the United States. We consider the debate over why women's political progress has stagnated and we consider the impact of the gender imbalance in American electoral politics - to what extent do these disparities matter? We begin by exploring women's suffrage campaigns and voting behavior in the period immediately following their achievement of the right to vote and beyond. We then turn to the relationship between women and party politics before discussing the challenges women face as candidates in American politics. We will focus on understanding why women remain underrepresented as legislators. We then consider the extent to which women's participation in campaigns and elections makes a substantive difference in policy making.

POLISCI 395S/HISTORY 395S – History of U.S. Social Policy, Politics of Gender, Race, and Class
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Elizabeth Sharrow

What are the problems associated with developing equitable and just policy?  Why does social policy in the United States continue to be marked by tensions between the principle of equality and the reality of inequalities in social, political, and economic realms?  How might policy subvert or reinforce these differences and inequalities?  This class examines the history of social policy in the United States, particularly those policies affecting concerns of gender, race, and class.  We will examine a wide range of social policies, focusing on those affecting groups such as: women, racial and ethnic minorities, LGBT people, and low-income people.  We will study primarily empirical work, while asking questions about how political culture, interest groups, social movements, government institutions and other factor influence U.S. social policy.

PSYCH 391ZZ – Psychology of the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual Experience
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
John Bickford

Students in this course will explore psychological theory and research pertaining to gay, lesbian, and bisexual people. Topics include sexual orientation, sexual identity development, stigma management, heterosexism & homonegativity, gender roles, same-sex relationships, LGB families, LGB diversity, and LGB mental health

PUBHLTH 390K – Maternal and Child Health in the Developing World
Monday  4:40-7:10 p.m.
Lynn Eckhert

This course is designed to give students a broad overview to pertinent topics in the field of global maternal and child health. Topics covered include causes of maternal and infant mortality, treatment of malaria in pregnancy, HIV and pregnancy, infant nutrition, maternal and child nutrition, gender roles, and cultural and religious concepts in relation to working in a global setting. This course will explore approaches to public health programming that acknowledge and incorporate cultural differences.

STPEC 492H – Marx and Postcolonialism
Tuesday 4:00-6:30 p.m.
Svati Shah

Postcolonialism has generally referred to the study of the histories, politics, economics, literature and social milieus of nations within Latin and South America, Africa and Asia. While these continental regions are also variously referenced as "the Third World" and "the Global South," the frame of 'postcolonialism' marks scholarship that has placed the history of colonialism and its aftermath at the center of our understanding of places that are often marked as being in a lesser relation to the "developed" world. Understanding hugely influential Marxist social movements and theories is essential to understanding how and why the postcolonial world comes to be, the challenges that activists working in countries in these regions face, and what the possibilities of mobilizing against right wing populism there might entail. The seminar will be taught from a feminist, queer and anthropological perspective, while focusing on foundational works on postcolonialism and its relationship with Marxist politics, theories, and movements. These include works by Marx, Trotsky, Gramsci, Goldman, James Trouillot, Goldman, Beverley, Mbembe, Fanon, Nandy, and the Subaltern Studies Group.

SOCIOL 106 – Race, Gender, Class & Ethnicity
Monday, Wednesday, Friday  10:10-11:00 a.m. – TBA
Monday, Wednesday  5:30-6:45 p.m. – Dan Clawson

Introduction to Sociology.  Analysis of the consequences of membership in racial, gender, class and ethnic groups on social, economic and political life.    (Gen.Ed. SB, U)

SOCIOL 283 – Gender and Society
Tuesday, Thursday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
TBA

Analysis of: 1) historical and cross-cultural variation in positions and relationships of women and men; 2) contemporary creation and internalization of gender and maintenance of gender differences in adult life; 3) recent social movements to transform or maintain "traditional" positions of women and men.  Prerequisite:  100-level Sociology course.

SOCIOL 287 – Sexuality and Society
Monday, Wednesday  5:30-6:45 p.m.
TBA

The many ways in which social factors shape sexuality. Focus on cultural diversity, including such factors as race/ethnicity, gender, and sexual identity in organizing sexuality in both individuals and social groups.  Prerequisite:  100-level Sociology course.  (Gen.Ed. SB, U)

SOCIOL 385 – Gender and the Family
Tuesday, Thursday  8:30-9:45 p.m.
TBA

This course explores the family as a gendered social construction. It considers how the family reflects and reproduces gender roles that are woven into the social norms of our society.

SOCIOL 397ED – Sociology of Eating Disorders
Monday, Wednesday, Friday  1:25-2:15 p.m.
Veronica Everett

This course is designed to look at eating disorders through the lens of Sociology. We will be discussing relevant topics such as social narratives around body image and media (including social media), gender norms, race, feminism, socioeconomic influences related to weight, the history of some of these variables and how they've evolved over time. We will also look at issues related to development and mental health including self-esteem, peer relationships, family systems/environment, mood disorders, trauma, diagnoses, healthcare policy and treatment. Lastly, as its relevant to you as students, we will look at college life and eating disorders as it is often a time when eating disorders develop or peak.

AFROAM 117 – Survey of Afro-American Literature
Monday, Wednesday  10:10-11:00 a.m.
Discussions Friday 10:10, 11:15
Britt Rusert

The major figures and themes in Afro-American literature, analyzing specific works in detail and surveying the early history of Afro-American literature. What the slave narratives, poetry, short stories, novels, drama, and folklore of the period reveal about the social, economic, psychological, and artistic lives of the writers and their characters, both male and female. Explores the conventions of each of these genres in the period under discussion to better understand the relation of the material to the dominant traditions of the time and the writers' particular contributions to their own art.  (Gen.Ed. AL, U)

AFROAM 118 – Survey of Afro-American Literature II
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Nadia Alahmed

Introductory level survey of Afro-American literature from the Harlem Renaissance to the present, including DuBois, Hughes, Hurston, Wright, Ellison, Baldwin, Walker, Morrison, Baraka and Lorde.

AFROAM 132 – African American History 1619-1860
Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:20 p.m.
Discussions Friday 1:25 and 2:30
Amilcar Shabazz

Overview of the history of African-Americans from the development of colonial slavery and the rise of African-American communities and culture. African background; Black protest tradition including abolitionism; the distinct experience of Black women.  (Gen.Ed. HS, U)

AFROAM 197A – Taste of Honey:  Black Film Since the 1950’s
Thursday  6:00-8:30 p.m.
John Bracey

See department for description.

ARTHIS 324/ART-HIS 624 – Modern Art, 1880-Present
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Karen Kurczynski

This course takes a new and interactive look at 20th Century art, from the move toward total abstraction around 1913 to the development of Postmodernism in the 1980s.  We examine the impact on art of social and political events such as World War I, the Russian Revolution, the rise of Fascism, the Mexican Revolution, the New Woman in the 1920s, World War II, the Cold War, and the rise of consumer culture.  We will investigate the origins and complex meanings of movements such as Fauvism, Cubism, Dada, Surrealism, Mexican Muralism, Abstract Expressionism, and Pop Art.  We will reconsider and reevaluate major issues in Modern art and culture such as the evolution of personal expression, the recognition of non-western culture in Euro-America, the interest in abstraction as a universal language, new technologies in art, the politics of the avant-garde and its attempts to reconnect art and life, issues of gender, race and representation, the role of myth and the unconscious, and the dialogue between art and popular culture.

ANTHRO 270 – North American Indians
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Jean Forward

Survey of the indigenous people of America north of Mexico; their regional variations and adaptations, their relationship to each other, and the changes taking place in their lifeways.  (Gen.Ed. SB, U)

ANTHRO 394AI – Europe After the Wall
Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Julie Hemment

The fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 was a seismic event that took the world by storm. It gave rise to dizzy optimism and hope for a new, post-ideological age and greater global unity, within and beyond Europe. Twenty years on, these hopes have not been realized. Cold War hostilities are alive and well and although the EU has expanded, Europe is, arguably, more divided than ever. This course explores the implications of the Wall and its passing for Europe, focusing on anthropological accounts of the (former) East bloc. The course is divided into three main parts: Europe behind the Iron Curtain (the cultural logics of state socialism); What Came Next? (the fall of the wall, international interventions to `democratize? post-socialist space); and a section that explores the post-socialist present. During this last bloc, we will explore themes of gender and generation, nostalgia and the politics of history, and the return of the state. As we go, we?ll be reading some of the most exciting new ethnographies of the region, grounded accounts that explore the transformations in social and cultural logics, power relations and practices that accompanied political and economic change. Through a mixture of group work, collaboratively designed projects and reflection papers, assignments are specifically tailored to enable you to bring the threads of your Gen Ed experience together as you consider the specific topics of the Cold War, state socialism and the global implications of its passing. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Anth majors.

ANTHRO 397RE – Anthropology of Race and Education
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Amanda Johnson

See department for description.

ANTHRO 397CC – Historical Archaeology
Tuesday, Thursday 5:30-6:45 p.m.
Linda Ziegenbein

This course will explore how historical archaeologists in the United States draw on material culture, documents, and the landscape to better understand the past and present.  Through readings, in-class discussion, and exercises, students will develop an understanding of the key questions that have propelled the field and the methods historical archaeologists use to address those questions.  Case studies will address how gender, race, economic class, and physical ability have shaped the experiences of people in Colonial New England, the slaveholding South and anti-slavery North, World War II-era California, and the 21st-century Southwest.

COMM 121 – Introduction to Media and Culture
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Emily West

This course considers how media and their surrounding economic and institutional frameworks affect cultural, political and ideological processes. The course introduces foundational theories of the media focusing on industries, technologies, media influence, meaning, and media audiences/users. Throughout the course we will consider how media influence our cultural assumptions regarding justice, identities (shaped by gender, racial identity, ethnicity, sexuality, and social class), and the nature of social life.

COMM 297FF – Fashion and Film
Monday 4:00-6:45 p.m.
Anne Ciecko

This course offers an introduction to fashion in and on film. It provides a historical, thematic, and international overview (including Hollywood), with a focus on filmic representations of fashion, clothing, and the body. The class format combines lecture, screening, and discussion.  Students are also welcome to simultaneously register for Comm 296F film festival colloquium (1 credit, pass/fail), since the fall 2017 film festival theme will be related to fashion.

CHINESE 597M – Ming-Qing Novel
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Elena Chiu

This course introduces the major works of traditional Chinese fiction, including Journey to the West, Romance of the Three Kingdoms, Water Margin, and Dream of the Red Chamber. We will engage in close readings of these great novels, while paying attention to issues such as the representation of history, gender relations, changes in conceptions of desire, religious and philosophical beliefs, and the characterization of heroes and anti-heroes, among others.

COMP-LIT 231 – Comedy
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
TBA

Our course begins with the premise that contemporary American comedy is informed by the histories of ethnic American groups -- African Americans, Native Americans, Asian Americans and U.S. Latinos/Latinas -- along with issues of race, class, sexuality and citizenship. American comedians, independent filmmakers, feminists and transgendered comics deploy the language of comedy to invoke serious social matters in contemporary American life: racism, heterosexism, homophobia, class biases against the poor and the undocumented, misogyny, war and other burning issues of the day. We will thus consider that the ends of comedy are more than laughter. Comedy confronts political issues that are constitutive of and threatening to the U.S. body politic.  (Gen Ed AL)

COMP-LIT 382 – Cinema and Psyche
Monday  4:00-6:45 p.m.
Kathryn Lachman

Exploration of contemporary international cinema through film history and psychoanalytic theory. Focus on comparative representations of nationality, childhood, and social dislocation. Topics addressed: inscriptions of the autobiographical; trans-cultural readings of visual texts; cinematic constructions of gender and subjectivity; dreams, fantasy, and memory; the "family romance."  (Gen.Ed. AT)

ECON 330 – Labor in the American Economy
Tuesday, Thursday  8:30-9:45 a.m.
Valerie Voorheis

Introduction to labor economics; emphasis on public policy issues such as unemployment, age and sex discrimination, collective bargaining, labor law reform, occupational safety and health.

ENGLISH 369 – Studies in Modern Fiction
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Stephen Clingman

This course will survey major trends in twentieth century fiction by taking as its theme the idea of `writing at the frontiers'. We'll understand this in various ways, ranging from the frontiers of form in the work of some of the century's foremost writers, to the literal frontiers that many of them have faced: of geography, culture, race, gender, politics, and (in the broadest sense) history. We will begin with the cultural phenomenon of modernism; that complex of literary, artistic and philosophical developments which defined a specific shift in modern intellectual consciousness between about 1880 and 1930.  (Gen.Ed. AL)

ENGLISH 491JM – U.S. Literature in Global Context
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Laura Doyle

The emergence of the U.S. as a nation unfolded in dynamic interaction with other nations and communities around the globe.  U.S. authors have been aware of those dynamics and have engaged with both national and international histories as they grappled with questions of freedom, collectivity, race, gender, and class.  Our main goal will be to understand the art, insights, and strains in these authors' writing, including both nineteenth- and twentieth-century authors.   To do that, we will read some history.  We will also read history simply to enhance our historical consciousness.  In this way our course combines readings in history and literature so as to enrich our thinking about both of them.

ENGLISH 494MI – Virtual Medieval: Fictions and Fantasies of the Middle Ages
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Jenny Adams

What is medieval? Most people learn very little about the foggy period that lies between the end of the Classical era and the start of the Renaissance. What we do learn usually consists of stereotypes. Jousting, chivalry, repression of women, religious fervor, medical ignorance, lice, Crusades, King Arthur, economic injustice, knights, ladies, and plague: such words, concepts, images predominate. How were these stereotypes produced? How are they reinforced or challenged on-line? What is their relationship to the ways the medieval world saw itself? In each module we will take up texts, objects, and concepts that have constructed and reconstructed our ideas about the Middle Ages. Our goals: to consider the ways we use objects and texts to construct history; to explore the relationship between academic and popular depictions of the medieval; and to think about the ways we might work across the academic/popular divide in order to offer competing views of the past. Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Engl students.

HISTORY 264 – History of Health Care and Medicine in the U.S.
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Emily Redman

This course explores the history and social meaning of medicine, medical practice, health care, and disease in the United States from 1600 to the present. Using a variety of sources aimed at diverse audiences students will investigate topics such as: the evolution of beliefs about the body; medical and social responses to infectious and chronic disease; the rise of medical science and medical organizations; the development of medical technologies; mental health diagnosis and treatment; changing conceptions of the body; the training, role, and image of medical practitioners and the role of public and government institutions in promoting health practices and disease treatments. We will pay particular attention to the human experience of medicine, with readings on the experience of being ill, the delivery of compassionate care, and the nature of the relationship between practitioners and patients. Course themes will include race, gender, cultural diversity, women and gender, social movements, science, technology, politics, industry, and ethics.

HISTORY 493M – Policing in Modern America
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Jennifer Fronc

In this course we will investigate and analyze major trends in the history of policing, broadly conceived, in the 20th century United States. This course is not meant as a chronological survey of U.S. history; instead, we will take a thematic approach, each week studying an issue or set of issues through a historical perspective. We will begin with an introduction to general theoretical approaches to the study of policing and the state, then turn to study the development of several different kinds of police forces in their historical contexts; private police in labor conflicts; the Bureau of Prohibition; and the Border Patrol. The course will also explore how evolving ideologies of race, class, gender, and sexuality have shaped understandings of what qualifies as criminal behavior in need of policing.

HISTORY 693W – Workers and Work in the Americas
Thursday  2:30-5:00
Kevin Young

This seminar introduces students to the study of labor and the working class, broadly defined, from the early 1800s to the present. We will begin by exploring the varied definitions of labor and the working class associated with Marxism, anarchism, and other theoretical traditions. From there we will survey the development of the field of labor history, focusing on the so-called new labor histories of the 1960s and onward, characterized by "bottom-up" approaches and an emphasis on the interplay of political economy, social relations, and cultural identities. Since the 1980s the field has taken new turns, for instance by emphasizing the roles of race, gender, sexuality, religion, and art in working-class life and labor movements. Specific topics will include slavery and slave resistance, the rise of mass production and the modern corporation, trade unionism and other worker strategies, the segmentation of the workforce along ethnic, gender, and other lines, the connection between labor relations and environmental degradation/sustainability, increased capital mobility over the past century, and worker migration both within and between nations. By examining a wide range of case studies from the modern United States, Latin America, and the Caribbean, we will seek to understand both the diversity of specific experiences and the global forces that shape workers' lives across the hemisphere. Though our primary geographic focus will be the Americas, we will also draw upon select case studies from Western Europe, Africa, and Asia. Requirements include a medium-length essay analyzing primary documents and/or oral histories plus a longer historiographical review paper due at the end of the semester.

JOURNAL 497J – Social Justice Journalism
Tuesday  10:00-12:00 p.m.
Razvan Sibii/Shaheen Pasha

This is an explanatory journalism class with an emphasis on the intractable structural issues confronting contemporary American society. Each iteration of the course will focus on one such issue (e.g., immigration, mass incarceration, gender inequality, racism in higher education), and will seek to work in collaboration with at least one NGO and one media institution. Students will report and produce a variety of journalistic stories pertaining to the chosen issue. They will also read and discuss professional and scholarly literature on subjects related to social justice/advocacy journalism (such as the question of journalistic objectivity, framing, media effects & agenda setting).  Open to Journalism majors only.  Prerequisite:  JOURNAL 300.

LEGAL 375 – Human Rights & Wrongs
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:15 p.m.
Jamie Rowen

Introduction to humanitarian law. Topics include theory and history of international human rights law, growth and nature of human rights organizations, regional human rights schemes, cross-cultural contexts and meanings for human rights, the politics and law of immigration and refugees, international criminal law and other mechanisms for humanitarian intervention. Prerequisite: course in Legal Studies or international politics.  Satisfies the Integrative Experience requirement for BA-Legal major.

LINGUIST 297A – Arguing About Language
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Lisa Green

This course investigates language and debates about language in areas such as social media, language and gender, linguistic appropriation in the media, and the justice system. Language samples from sources such as social media tweets, court cases, Disney movies, and print and other media commentary will be analyzed.

POLSCI 310 – Race and American Politics
Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Tatishe Nteta

This course explores both the historical and contemporary role(s) of race, ethnicity, and immigration in the construction and operation of American political life, and asks if DuBois' "color line" remains a pressing problem in the twenty-first century.

PSYCH 391CE – The Psychology of Current Events
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Mattitiyahu Zimbler

The Psychology of Current events gives students the time and resources to examine the world around them through a Social Psychological lens. We will explore topics such as race, class, and gender as we draw material from the news, psychological journal articles, and primary source texts. Using these foundational texts as a jumping off point, we will discuss the social psychological underpinnings of the events currently affecting the world today. This class requires student participation and is writing intensive.

PUBHLTH 284H – Social Facts and Cinematic Acts
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Louis Graham

Sociocultural norms impact health and stem, in part, from cultural products such as art, literature, and film. This course will consider popular motion pictures as both data and intervention on societal knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about health, identities, and social determinants. Students will be provided with an introductory understanding of public health concepts through critical analysis of popular cinema.  A combination of lectures, readings and films will enable students to understand relationships between social norms shaped, in part, by movies and psychosocial, sexual health, and chronic disease outcomes. Students will learn to examine the assumptions made by filmmakers, motion pictures as partial representations of society, audiences, and other key elements. This course uses film to explore and question the cultural landscape of public health in today's society. Public health is a diverse field that reaches not only into many areas of daily life, but into our cultural imagination as well.

PUBLHLTH 389 – Health Inequities
Wednesday, Friday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
Elena Nuciforo

While the health and wellbeing of the nation has improved overall, racial, ethnic, gender and sexuality disparities in morbidity and mortality persist. To successfully address growing disparities, it is important to understand social determinants of health and translate current knowledge into specific strategies to undo health inequalities. This course will explore social justice as a philosophical underpinning of public health and will consider the etiology of disease rooted in social conditions. It aims to strengthen critical thinking, self-discovery, and knowledge of ways in which socioeconomic, political, and cultural systems structure health outcomes.

STPEC 101 – Introduction to STPEC
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Katherine Mallory

For incoming STPEC majors.  Introduces STPEC's requirements and vision, organized around concepts students will encounter in STPEC courses.  Focused on understanding the methodologies of social theory, political economy, and history, and issues of race, gender, global inequality, and the postcolonial world.

STPEC 189 – Introduction to Radical Social Theory in Historical Context
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
TBA

This is an introductory course to radical social theory. Our focus is the history of social thought in the West, and the postcolonial critiques of some of these ideas. In this course, students will learn that "radical" means "at the root," and radical social theory is theory that explains the roots of social inequalities and proposes ways of transforming society to achieve justice. As a General Education course, our goal is for students to have the opportunity to discuss key societal issues through a variety of disciplines, including philosophy, anthropology,history, economy, African-American, Native American and gender and sexuality studies. Through analysis of readings and films, we will explore the connection between cultural processes and power in the West and the implications for non-Western people on a global scale and on different times and places.

STPEC 320 – Writing for Social Consciousness
Wednesday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Ethan Myers

The STPEC Junior Writing Seminar focuses on individual development of voice. We will weave this theme through standard essay assignments, weekly response papers, cover letters and resumes, and a student-driven class project of your choosing. Since you and your classmates with be struggling together to find your voices, we’ll focus on peer-editing and tutoring techniques at the beginning of the semester. As we discuss peer-editing, we may consider issues of language and dialect, Black English, Standard Written English and feminism. The second half of the semester will focus on political, environmental, educational, cultural, and philosophical texts. Throughout all assignments I expect to see cultivation of your voice and communication of your own creative ideas. I encourage integration of ideas from your other courses and experiences. Be prepared to think critically and examine texts carefully. We will be sharing our writing with each other – be ready to give and receive constructive feedback.

STPEC 391H – Core Seminar I
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Graciela Monteagudo

This seminar is the first in the yearlong STPEC Core Seminar Sequence. STPEC Core Seminar I focuses on major theoretical currents in political theory and the historical circumstances that gave rise to those theories-in particular Liberalism, Marxism and Anarchism. STPEC Core Seminar II will analyze contemporary social movements in the context of these (and other theoretical apparatuses). As this is an interdisciplinary class, we will be bringing in analytic tools from various disciplines- including economics and political theory-but always paying attention to the historical construction and reception of ideas.

STPEC 392H – Core Seminar II
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
TBA

The second half of the STPEC Seminar sequence, STPEC Core Seminar II focuses on a series of interrelated political, social and theoretical movements of the 20th Century. In STPEC Core Seminar I we studied some of the driving forces behind the production of modernity as way to organize and understand the world. STPEC Core Seminar II will pay particular attention to the way in which the political practices and philosophies of the 20th Century relate to the successes and catastrophic failures of modernism in complex and contradictory ways. Some of the topics addressed include the Russian Revolution, totalitarianism, anti/post-colonialism, the role of identity in political theory/practice and postmodernism. A major research paper of the student's choosing will be produced over the course of the semester allowing her/him to both (1) more deeply engage with a topic, including one that may not be discussed in the seminar, and (2) practice applying the critical methodological and theoretical tools developed in the STPEC curriculum.

STPEC 491H – Mass Resistance and Political Strategy
Wednesday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Kevin Young

“Politics” is much more than just elections and voting: political action often employs other strategies, from sitins, boycotts, strikes, and divestment campaigns to occupations of workplaces and public squares. Why do people engage in such forms of resistance? Why do social movements choose the strategies that they do? And what makes movements effective? Scholars and activists have offered many different answers to these questions. This seminar surveys these debates, drawing from a range of theoretical, historical, and contemporary perspectives on mass-based resistance. Thematic case studies will include abolitionist, labor, civil rights, peasant, student, feminist, LGBTQ, antiwar, anti-imperialist, indigenous autonomy, and environmentalist movements. We will also consider some of the forces that mobilize in opposition to these movements. Geographically, cases will draw from the United States, Latin America, Egypt, South Africa, Germany, and elsewhere. The second half of the semester will be heavily structured around students’ own interests, with each

SOCIOL 103 – Social Problems
Tuesday, Thursday  11:30-12:45 p.m.
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
TBA

Introduction to sociology.  America's major social problems--past and present--are examined.  These include crime, mental health, drug addiction, family tensions and inequalities based on race, gender, ethnicity and social class. (Gen.Ed. SB, U)

SOCIOL 248 – Conformity and Deviance
Monday, Wednesday, Friday  10:10-11:00 a.m.
TBA

This course examines the social processes of rule-making and rule-breaking, and how categories of "normal" and "deviance" change historically. We examine different theories of conformity and deviance, using topics such as sexuality and politics.

SOCIOL 330 – Asian Americans and Inequalities
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Moon-Kie Jung

At least since the 1960s, sociology and the other social sciences have largely sidestepped questions of inequality in relation to Asian Americans, simplistically and indiscriminately positing them as a "model minority." This course examines various forms of social inequality between Asian Americans and other groups as well as among Asian Americans, including those based on race, gender, class, citizenship, and sexuality.

SOCIOL 461 – Race and Racism
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:45 p.m.
Moon-Kie Jung

Though biologically untenable, race continues to structure virtually every aspect of social life, from life expectancies at birth to death penalty executions. Topics to be covered in this course include the historical origins and evolution of race and racism, gender and class dynamics of race, antiracist movements, poverty, higher education, migration, incarceration, and nationalism. Considering and critiquing various theoretical approaches, this course reaches beyond the Black-white binary and, though focusing on the United States, also examines race and racism in other contexts.

SOCIOL 329 – Social Movements
Monday, Wednesday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
TBA

Explores how and why social movements occur, what strategies they use, how they create collective identities, how issues such as civil rights, workers' rights, women's rights, the environment, the global economy mobilize activists' participation within the circumstances faced.

SPANISH 397PP – Spanish Cinema
Monday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Barbara Zecchi

Analysis of several films by some of the most important Spanish directors from the sixties to the early 21st Century, in the context of Spanish history, society, culture and politics.  Special attention will be given to films by Bu’uel, Saura and Almodovar.  The following topics will be analyzed: representation of gender; history; filmic narrative; role of religion; sexual and sociopolitical repression; violence and transgression; and other topics. Films have sub-titles. Course taught in English. Course may be used for Certificate in Film Studies.

SPANISH 397P – Latinx Theater Project
Tuesday, Thursday  4:00-5:15 p.m.
Kristie Soares

The class immerses students in Latinx theatre pedagogies (Boal, Teatro Campesino, the Nuyorican poetry movement, Latina performance art) by having them read the philosophies behind these movements, practice their exercises, and get trained to facilitate the exercises. The class will be made up of both undergraduates at UMass and Latinx high school students. Students of all levels will work together, perform together, and create art together. The goal is understanding and enacting social justice work through theatre. No prior theatre experience is needed. The only pre-requisite in an interest in social justice.

THEATER 130 – Contemporary Playwrights of Color
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
TBA

Theater movements of Blacks, Latinos, Asians, and Native Americans, and the body of literature by contemporary playwrights of color within a historical context.  (Gen.Ed. AL, U).

THEATER 307L – Theaters of Dissent
Monday, Wednesday  10:10-12:05 p.m.
Megan Lewis

Artists across human history have addressed social injustice and played a dissenting role in society. In our current political climate, the role of the artist is charged with an urgency and relevance. Performing artists use live bodies (their own and those of others) to take up space, disrupt the status quo, comment on contemporary states of/and affairs, and to (re)imagine human possibilities and connections. This course will explore contemporary and historic forms of performed dissent and resistance including The Black Arts Movement, protest theatre in apartheid South Africa, feminist body art, Act Up! Latinx agit-prop and guerilla theatre, street art, graffiti and hip hop artistic practices, culture jamming, and political protests from Black Lives Matter to the 2017 Women's March. Students will learn about, and then make, pieces of dissenting performance art.  Instructor consent required. 

WGSS 791B – Feminist Theory
Tuesday  1:00-3:30 p.m.
Kiran Asher

This graduate seminar in feminist theory constitutes a core course for students enrolled in the Graduate Certificate in Advanced Feminist Studies. The seminar will be organized around questions that emerge for feminisms from the rubrics of gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality, transnationalism, human rights, economics and postcolonialism.  Feminist theory is inherently interdisciplinary and we will draw on classic and contemporary writings from the many fields that contribute to the "field."  This is a required course for students enrolled in the Certificate in Advanced Feminist Studies.  Contact Linda Hillenbrand to add the course lindah@umass.edu.

THESE COURSES COUNT TOWARDS THE OPEN ELECTIVE REQUIREMENT FOR THE GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ADVANCED FEMINIST STUDIES

COMM 620 – Qualitative Methods in Research
Tuesday 4:00-6:45 p.m.
Leda Cooks

Qualitative approaches to research, conceptualizations of problems, questions, and methodologies for the field of communication.  Emphasis on, interpretive, feminist, critical, and cultural approaches. Introduction to methodological specialties of departmental faculty. Required of all Communication graduate students.

EDUC 683 – Women in Higher Education
Wednesday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Benita Barnes

Women now comprise a majority of all American undergraduate students, but only a minority of senior professors, senior administrators, or presidents.  This course is an introduction to the issues affecting women in the academy as students, educators, leaders, and scholars.  Some of the topics include:  barriers to women's full participation in higher education, including sexual harassment and racism; the question of coeducation versus single-sex education; conditions for women undergraduates including the so-called "chilly climate."  In addition, the course will explore issues germane to female faculty members, barriers to institutional leadership, and the goals and contributions of women's studies as well as the current attack on feminist scholarship.  This is a seminar style course where students are expected to participant fully.

EDUC 752 – Gender Issues in International Education
Monday 1:25-4:25 p.m.
Jacqi Mosselson

Impact of national economic and social development on women's role and status, especially in Third World countries.  Analysis of educational strategies for promoting equal participation of women in this process.

ENGLISH 791E – Theorizing the Discipline
Wednesday  400-6:30 p.m.
Jord/ana Rosenberg

This course will give graduate students an introduction to the history and methodology of literary study. We will concentrate on Marxist literary and cultural criticism; theories of postcoloniality and decolonization; neoliberalism, critical race studies; feminism, and queer theory. Authors will include: Althusser, Adorno, Benjamin, Deleuze and Guattari, Fanon, Freud, Gilroy, Gramsci, C.L.R. James, Marx, Mbembe, Fred Moten, and Raymond Williams.

POLISCI 795B – Feminist Theory and Politics
Thursday  5:30-8:00 p.m.
Barbara Cruikshank

See department for description. 

THESE COURSES SATISFY THE TRANSNATIONAL/CRITICAL RACE FEMINISMS REQUIREMENT FOR THE GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN ADVANCED FEMINIST STUDIES

ENGLISH 791RC – Race and Cultural Critique
Tuesday 5:30-8:00 p.m.
Caroline Yang

This seminar will introduce students to race as a category of analysis and critique. We will begin by grounding ourselves in the history of racial formations in the United States and study various interdisciplinary theorizations of race and the material effects of racism on racialized lives. The texts for the first portion of the course may include Michael Omi and Howard Winant’s Racial Formations in the United States, W.E.B. Du Bois’s Souls of Black Folk and Black Reconstruction in America, David Roediger’s Wages of Whiteness, critical essays by Kimberlé Crenshaw and Cheryl Harris, Moon-Kie Jung’s Beneath the Surface of White Supremacy, Michelle Alexander’s The New Jim Crow, and Chandan Reddy’s Freedom with Violence. The latter part of the class will focus on the notion of cultural critique as we think about how we read race as literary critics. The texts could include Asha Nadkarni’s Eugenic Feminism, Toni Morrison’s Playing in the Dark and Home, Aida Levy-Hussen’s How to Read African American Literature, and Elda Tsou’s Unquiet Tropes. The books will be ordered through Amherst Books and Amazon.

ENGLISH 891BF – Narratives of Development and Globalization
Thursday 1:00-3:30 p.m.
Asha Nadkarni

The “age of development” officially began in the post-World War II era of decolonization, transforming development into the new “white man’s burden.” At the same moment, postcolonial nation states turned to the discourse of development as a means of articulating their identity on the global stage. In the last several decades, neoliberal regimes of globalization have challenged the shape and form of national development. This course begins with classical theories of imperialism before turning to modernization theory, dependency theory, post-development theory and current theories of globalization and neoliberalism. In each case it seeks to unpack the theoretical and historical contexts of development and globalization with a particular eye to the ways in which subjects are interpellated as “developed” or “underdeveloped.” We will also explore representations of developmental and neoliberal regimes of subjection in literary and filmic texts by authors that may include Aravind Adiga, Mohsin Hamid, Kiran Desai, Jhumpa Lahiri, Alex Rivera, and Stephen Frears.

HISTORY 691C – Gender, Guerilla & Resistance in Brazil and Southern Cone Dictatorships
Tuesday 4:00-6:30 p.m.
Cristina Scheibe Wolff

We will explore the context of Brazil and Southern Cone of Latin America Dictatorships, mainly of the 1970s and 1980s including Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Paraguay and Uruguay, focusing on how resistance and guerrilla movements strategically used gender and emotions. We will use bibliography as well some other resources - films and documents - to explore this context and to have a comprehensive view of gender, sexuality and emotions at this period.

POLISCI 795F – Feminist Politics:  Comparative and Transnational Perspectives
Tuesday  5:30-8:00 p.m.
Sonia Alvarez

This course examines past and present experiences of feminist activism, participation, and protest. Drawing on case studies from Latin America, the U.S, Europe and other world regions, we will pay particular attention to the dynamics of mid-20th to early 21st century feminist movements, their points of intersection and conflict anti-racist/Black activism and LGBTQ organizing, and their entanglements with today?s anti-austerity and pro-democracy protests. We will also explore feminisms? relationship to States and intergovernmental arenas and how and why feminist activisms are articulated translocally and transnationally.

SOCIOL 794B – Sociology of Sexualities
Tuesday  4:00-6:30 p.m.
Amy Schalet

See department for description.

WGSS 393A/693A – Reading Audre Lorde
Wednesday  2:30-5:00 P.M.
Angie Willey

Deeply committed to both embodiment and politics in her writing, Audre Lorde - self-described black lesbian feminist mother warrior poet - is among those whose work has been variously claimed as both “essentialist” and “antiessentialist” (as either supporting or challenging biologically reductionist accounts of experience). As such a border figure, she has allowed us to tend to the power of both bodies and politics without placing them in hierarchical relation as causal elements in the making of our realities. Lorde’s erotic, like her anger, and her engagements with illness and pain, provide resources for holding our analyses of embodiment accountable to our critical engagements with culture and history and vice versa. Together we will read Lorde and readings of her work to explore her legacies as a scholar of bodies-in-context. What sorts of body knowledges does Lorde’s writing suggest are needed and undervalued? How can Lorde’s rich and diverse approaches to embodiment help us think about politics, desire, justice, health, ethics, resistance, and what it might mean to live a feminist life here and now?

WGSS 397R/WGSS 697R – The Romances, Rhetorics, and Realities of Women and Sustainability
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:15 a.m.
Kiran Asher

The 2014 United Nations Survey Report on the role of women in development makes a strong case for linking gender equality and sustainable development.  Neither concerns about gender equality nor sustainability are new, but are re-emerging as part of the post-2015 sustainable development agenda. This class examines perceived and existing links between economic development, women, and gender from various perspectives. Informed by feminist theories of power and politics we will engage with the following questions: How did concerns about "third world women" enter discussions about international development and social change? How have feminists concerned with gender and power explained and addressed the roles and needs of “third world women?” How have concerns over women and gender been adopted/adapted by development institutionsand interventions, and with what results?  What role are women and gender playing in environmental debates about around climate change, food security, etc. How have women across the world organized to address their concerns, and with what results?  This

Summer Session 1 – 5/22/17 – 6/30/17
Summer Session 2 – 7/10/17-8/18/15
www.umassulearn.net

DEPARTMENTAL

(100-level count towards the WGSS minor but not the WGSS major)

WGSS 187 – Gender, Sexuality and Culture
Session 1 – Cassuandra Rodriguez
Session 2 – Martha Balaguera Cuervo

This course offers an introduction to some of the basic concepts and theoretical perspectives in Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies. Drawing on disciplinary, interdisciplinary and cross-cultural studies, students will engage critically with issues such as gender inequities, sexuality, families, work, media images, queer issues, masculinity, reproductive rights, and history. Throughout the course, students will explore how experiences of gender and sexuality intersect with other social constructs of difference, including race/ethnicity, class, and age. Special attention will be paid to the ways in which interlocking systems of oppression have shaped and influenced the historical, cultural, social, political, and economical contexts of our lives, and the social movements at the local, national and transnational levels which have led to key transformations. GenEd I U

WGSS 205 – Feminist Health Politics – Session 2
Kirsten Leng

What is health?  What makes health a matter of feminism?  And what might a feminist health politics look like?  These questions lay at the heart of this course.  In Feminist Health Politics, we will examine how health becomes defined, and will question whether health and disease are objectively measured conditions or subjective states.  We will also consider why and how definitions and standards of health have changed over time; why and how standards and adjudications of health vary according to gender, race, sexuality, class, and nationality; and how definitions of health affect the way we value certain bodies and ways of living.   Additionally, we will explore how knowledge about health is created; how environmental conditions, social location, politics, and economic conditions affect health; how various groups have fought for changes to health care practices and delivery; and how experiences of health and illness have been reported and represented.

ANTHRO 205 – Inequality and Oppression – Session 1
Jonathan Hill

This course draws on the holistic discipline of anthropology to examine processes and systems of inequality and oppression, particularly in the United States. As an academic discipline, anthropology aims to understand and explain the diversity that characterizes our species over geographical space and evolutionary time. In this course we will use the integrated nature of anthropology to deconstruct the naturalization of inequalities based on race, gender, and sexuality. Research in cultural anthropology offers detailed and rich accounts of local meanings, experiences, and cultural practices. In this course we will focus on anthropological studies that link personal narratives and local meanings to the social processes and relations of power in which those experiences are formed and play out.

COMM 288 – Gender, Sex and Representation – Session 2
Sut Jhally

This course will examine the relationship between commercialized systems of representation and the way that gender and sexuality are thought of and organized in the culture. In particular, we will look at how commercial imagery impacts upon gender identity and the process of gender socialization. Central to this discussion will be the related issues of sexuality and sexual representation (and the key role played by advertising).

ENGLISH 132 – Gender, Sexuality, Literature and Culture – Session 1
Sohini Banerjee

Literature treating the relationship between man and woman. Topics may include: the nature of love, the image of the hero and heroine, and definitions, past and present, of the masculine and feminine.  (Gen.Ed. AL, G)

FRENCH 230 – Love and Sex in French Culture – Session 1
Patrick Mensah

Course taught in English.  This course offers a broad historical overview of the ways in which love and erotic behavior in French culture have been represented and understood in the arts, especially in Literature and, more recently, in film, from the middle ages to the twentieth century. (Gen.Ed. AL)

LEGAL 297R – Gender, Law, and Politics – Session 2
Lisa Solowiej

This course explores legal constructions of gender by introducing case law, federal legislation, news stories, and scholarly essays concerning sexual inequality in the United States. Special attention will be paid to grassroots movements, particularly those surrounding suffrage, reproduction, sexual activity, and marriage. We will explore how the legal system, through regulation, has changed gender relations for both women and men concerning marriage, divorce, work, and family. We will also consider how these struggles for equality have varied across race, religion, sexual identity, and class with particular attention to feminist critiques of economic inequality.

SOCIOL 106 – Race, Gender, Class & Ethnicity – Session 2
Juyeon Park

Introduction to Sociology.  Analysis of the consequences of membership in racial, gender, class and ethnic groups on social, economic and political life.   
(Gen.Ed. SB, U)

SOCIOL 222 – The Family – Session 1
Enku Ide

First part: historical transformations in family life (relationships between husbands and wives, position and treatment of children, importance of kinship ties); second part: the contemporary family through life course (choice of a mate, relations in marriage, parenthood, breakup of the family unit). (Gen.Ed. SB, U)

SOCIOL 287 – Sexuality and Society – Session 2
Brandi Perri

The many ways in which social factors shape sexuality. Focus on cultural diversity, including such factors as race/ethnicity, gender, and sexual identity in organizing sexuality in both individuals and social groups.  Prerequisite:  100-level Sociology course.  (Gen.Ed. SB, U)

 

COMPONENT

(WGSS majors and minors must concentrate their work on gender.  100-level courses count towards the WGSS minor but NOT the WGSS major). 

AFROAM 236 – History of the Civil Rights Movement – Session 2
Nadia Alahmed

Examination of the Civil Rights Movement  from the Brown v. Topeka decision to the rise of Black power. All the major organizations of the period, e.g., SCLC, SNCC, CORE, NAACP, and the Urban League. The impact on white students and the anti-war movement.  (Gen.Ed. HS, U)

ANTHRO 258 – Food and Culture – Session 1
Dana Conzo

This course surveys how cultural anthropologists have studied the big questions about food and culture. How and why do people restrict what foods are considered ?edible? or morally acceptable? How is food processed and prepared, and what does food tell us about other aspects of culture like gender and ethnic identity? How have power issues of gender, class, and colonialism shaped people?s access to food? How has industrialization changed food, and where are foodways headed in the future? Along the way, students will read and see films about foodways in Europe, Africa, Asia, the United States, and Latin America. (Gen. Ed. SB, G)

COMM 287 – Advertising as Social Communication – Session 1
Sut Jhally

This course looks at advertising from the viewpoint of  social theory (that is, of how we can understand advertising's broad political, economic, social, and cultural role in modern society).  The course will broadly examine the social role of advertising in consumer societies with a central focus its relationship to: the construction of individual identity, the quest for happiness; the evolving environmental crisis based on depleting resources and climate change; the process of globalization; the commercialization of childhood; the definition of health and wellness; and the crisis of financial debt.

EDUC 210 – Social Diversity in Education – Session 1
Antonio Martinez

Focus on issues of social identity, social and cultural diversity, and societal manifestations of oppression.  Draws on interdisciplinary perspectives of social identity development, social learning theory, and sociological analyses of power and privilege within broad social contexts.  (Gen.Ed. I, U)

COMM – Consumer Culture – Session 2
Emily West

The mass media are frequently criticized for their role in creating or perpetuating materialism and a consumer culture. This course will consider different theoretical and disciplinary approaches to understanding our consumer culture and the mass media's place in it. Topics will include the influence of advertisers on a media environment that promotes consumption; the experience of shopping; the exercise of taste through consumption; the relationship between consumerism, citizenship, and patriotism; consumer rights; and the meaning of consumption for economically disadvantaged groups.

HISTORY 154 – Social Change in the 1960’s – Sessions 1 & 2
Julia Sandy-Bailey

Few periods in United States. history experienced as much change and turmoil as the "Long Sixties" (1954-1975), when powerful social movements overhauled American gender norms, restructured the Democratic and Republican parties, and abolished the South's racist "Jim Crow" regime. This course examines the movements that defined this era. We will explore the civil rights and Black Power movements; the student New Left and the antiwar movement; the women's and gay liberation movements; struggles for Asian American, Chicano/a, Native American, and Puerto Rican freedom; as well as the rise of conservatism. Throughout the semester, we will assess Sixties social movements' ideals, strategies, and achievements, and their ongoing influence upon U.S. politics, society, and culture. (Gen.Ed. HS, U)

HISTORY 170 – Indigenous Peoples of North America – Session 2
Alice Nash

The diverse histories of indigenous peoples in North America from their origins to the present. Focus on indigenous perspectives, examining social, economic, and political issues experienced by indigenous peoples. Emphasis on diversity, continuity, change, and self-determination. (Gen.Ed. HS, U)

HISTORY 264 – History of Health Care and Medicine in the U.S. – Session 1
Elizabeth Sharpe

This course explores the history and social meaning of medicine, medical practice, health care, and disease in the United States from 1600 to the present. Using a variety of sources aimed at diverse audiences students will investigate topics such as: the evolution of beliefs about the body; medical and social responses to infectious and chronic disease; the rise of medical science and medical organizations; the development of medical technologies; mental health diagnosis and treatment; changing conceptions of the body; the training, role, and image of medical practitioners and the role of public and government institutions in promoting health practices and disease treatments. We will pay particular attention to the human experience of medicine, with readings on the experience of being ill, the delivery of compassionate care, and the nature of the relationship between practitioners and patients. Course themes will include race, gender, cultural diversity, women and gender, social movements, science, technology, politics, industry, and ethics.

PUBHLTH 370 – Public Health Through the Ages – Session 2
Alice Fiddian-Green

This course will provide emerging public health professionals with an overview of the historical evolution of the field of public health, from Hippocrates to war and industrialization; from the sanitary movement, quarantine, and the development of public health boards; to the ethical concerns linked to the management and control of disease and promotion of health. In the second half of the semester, we will use the example of maternal and reproductive health to illustrate some of the underlying tensions in current public health research and programming. Enhancing students? understanding of the history of public health will provide essential perspectives on current public health events and concerns to both inform and strengthen approaches to improving overall health.

SOCIOL 103 – Social Problems – Session 1
Yalcin Ozkan

Introduction to sociology.  America's major social problems--past and present--are examined.  These include crime, mental health, drug addiction, family tensions and inequalities based on race, gender, ethnicity and social class. (Gen.Ed. SB, U)

SOCIOL 224 – Social Class and Inequality – Session 2
Skylar Davidson

The nature of social classes in society from the viewpoint of differences in economic power, political power, and social status. Why stratification exists, its internal dynamics, and its effects on individuals, subgroups, and the society as a whole. Problems of poverty and the uses of power.  (Gen.Ed. SB, U)

THEATER 130 – Contemporary Playwrights of Color – Session 2
Claudia Nolan

Theater movements of Blacks, Latinos, Asians, and Native Americans, and the body of literature by contemporary playwrights of color within a historical context.  (Gen.Ed. AL, U)

 

SWAG 246/BLST 246 – Introduction to Black Girlhood Studies
Monday, Wednesday 2:30-3:50 p.m.

Dominique Hill

The course introduces students to theories, methods, and analytical approaches to the study of Black girlhood. Students will interrogate Black girlhood as a political category of identity and symbol of agency, addressing such topics as foundations of the field, utility of the categories of "girl" and "woman" and representation of Black girlhood in academic literature and popular culture. We will explore problems pressing upon the lives of Black girls with respect to their lived experiences of work, sexuality, and education and illuminate the strategies, genius and potential of Black girls and Black girlhood. Working within and beyond Black radical hip hop feminist frameworks, our learning will involve thinking through and embodying theories and practices -- emancipatory, humanizing, radical acts -- as produced by Black girls, artists, and scholars. Class materials will include journal articles, films, novels, music and student-generated ethnographic observations.

SWAG 300/BLST 236 – Black Sexualities
Tuesday, Thursday 2:30-3:50 p.m.
Khary Polk

From the modern era to the contemporary moment, the intersection of race, gender, and class has been especially salient for people of African descent—for men as well as for women. How might the category of sexuality act as an additional optic through which to view and reframe contemporary and historical debates concerning the construction of black identity? In what ways have traditional understandings of masculinity and femininity contributed to an understanding of African American life and culture as invariably heterosexual? How have black lesbian, gay, and transgendered persons effected political change through their theoretical articulations of identity, difference, and power? In this interdisciplinary course, we will address these questions through an examination of the complex roles gender and sexuality play in the lives of people of African descent. Remaining attentive to the ways black people have claimed social and sexual agency in spite of systemic modes of inequality, we will engage with critical race theory, black feminist thought, queer-of-color critique, literature, art, film, “new media” and erotica, as well as scholarship from anthropology, sociology, and history.

SWAG 310/ARHA 385/EUST 385 – Witches, Vampires and Other Monsters
Tuesday, Thursday  2:30-3:50 p.m.
Natasha Staller

This course will explore the construction of the monstrous, over cultures, centuries and disciplines. With the greatest possible historical and cultural specificity, we will investigate the varied forms of monstrous creatures, their putative powers, and the explanations given for their existence-as we attempt to articulate the kindred qualities they share. Among the artists to be considered are Valdés Leal, Velázquez, Goya, Munch, Ensor, Redon, Nolde, Picasso, Dalí, Kiki Smith, and Cindy Sherman.

SWAG 347/BLST 347 – Race, Sex and Gender in the U.S. Military
Tuesday, Thursday  10:00-11:20 a.m.
Khary Polk

From the aftermath of the Civil War to today's "global war on terror," the U.S. military has functioned as a vital arbiter of the overlapping taxonomies of race, gender, and sexuality in America and around the world. This course examines the global trek of American militarism through times of war and peace in the twentieth century.  In a variety of texts and contexts, we will investigate how the U.S. military's production of new ideas about race and racialization, masculinity and femininity, and sexuality and citizenship impacted the lives of soldiers and civilians, men and women, at "home" and abroad.  Our interdisciplinary focus will allow us to study the multiple intersections of difference within the military, enabling us to address a number of topics, including:  How have African American soldiers functioned as both subjects and agents of American militarism?  What role has the U.S. military played in the creation of contemporary gay and lesbian subjectivity?  Is military sexual assault a contemporary phenomenon or can it be traced to longer practices of sexual exploitation occurring on or around U.S. bases globally? 

SWAG 400 – Contemporary Debates: Women and Right-Wing Populism
Wednesday  2:00-4:30 p.m.
Amrita Basu

This seminar will explore the consequences of neoliberalism, cultural conservatism, Islamophobia, and anti-immigrant sentiments for women of different social and economic strata as well as women’s divergent political responses. Why have some women become prominent right wing leaders and activists while others have allied with leftist, anti-racist, and other progressive forces to fight for the rights of women and other marginalized groups? How have transnational forces influenced both forms of women’s activism? To what extent are there cross-national similarities in the impact of the far right surge on women, gender and sexuality? The seminar will draw on examples from many different regions of the world, with particular attention to India and the U.S. There will be a final research paper for this course.

CSI 161 – Black Girlhood Studies
Monday, Wednesday  9:00-10:20 a.m.
TBA

This course explores narratives of black girlhood from the nineteenth century to our contemporary moment. Students will analyze black girlhood through a diverse collection of sources including young adult literature, street lit, personal narratives, and recent scholarship in Black Girlhood Studies. We will consider the following questions: How do the intersections of race, class, gender, and geography impact the ways we understand girlhood? How have black girls defined girlhood and the transition from black girl to black woman? How do representations of black girlhood challenge dominant conceptualizations of American childhood and young adulthood? To answer these questions, students will examine the racialization of girlhood, the criminalization of black girls, sexual literacy, youth activism, education, and black girls in social media and hip-hop culture. Some of the texts we will engage include The Coldest Winter Ever (Sister Souljah) and Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools (Monique Morris).

CSI 181 – Women in Game Programming
Monday, Wednesday  2:30-3:50 p.m.
Ira Fay

This course is designed to give students a strong introduction to computer programming, with an emphasis on programming games. No prior programming experience is necessary. As the title reveals, this course particularly invites self-identified women, though all interested students are of course welcome! We will consider (and hopefully impact) the current gender imbalances in the professional world of game development. The course will include guest interviews with notable women in game programming. By the end of the course, successful students will be able to write programs of moderate difficulty and use C# and Unity to implement computer games. As a course that can provide a solid foundation for further computer science courses, this class will expose students to variables, conditionals, loops, functions, comments, and object oriented programming concepts. For more information, see irafay.com/classes.

CSI 184 – Thinking Alongside (Post)Colonial Technologies of ‘Women’
Monday, Wednesday 4:00-5:20 p.m.
Fiona Geist

Central to this course in postcolonial feminist science studies will be an investigation of the ways in which science shapes 'women.' More specifically, it addresses the ways in which sciences of race construct women differently and how this construction in turn shapes technology. This includes the investigation of issues surrounding sexuality, reproduction, transsexuality, and systems of colonial control. By analysing complex mechanisms at the intersection of identity and race making we will elucidate how these investments impact our own understandings of race, sex, gender and sexuality. Questions we might ask are: How are we to understand the ways in which identity is imbricated with the circulation of technology? and how do coloniality and the distribution of technologies produce women differently across a number of colonial and raced divides? The purpose of this course is to develop a strong reading comprehension of the deep imbrication between race, gender, and technology.

CSI 188 – Women’s Work in the Global Economy
Monday, Wednesday  10:30-11:50 a.m.
Lynda Pickbourn

This course focuses on women's work amid the labor market transformations that have resulted from economic restructuring informed by neoliberal policies and the reorganization of production in both high and low income countries over the last four decades or so. The course analyzes different dimensions of these processes, points out the contradictory tendencies at work and emphasizes the shared concerns of women workers across the globe. Among the questions that will be addressed in the course are the following: what repercussions have these changes in the structure of production in the world economy had on the employment of women in both high and low income countries? Are women better or worse off as a result of these changes? What does the feminization of the labor force mean, and how is it different from the feminization of labor? What are the main trends leading to labor market informalization? What are the implications of these trends for people who must work for a living? Can we generalize across countries? Is there a role for government policy, international labor standards, as well as social and political activism across borders in raising wages, promoting equal opportunity, fighting discrimination in the workplace, and securing greater control over working hours and conditions?

CSI 208 – Queer Feelings:  The Emotional and Affective Life of Gender, Sexuality and Race
Monday, Wednesday  1:00-2:20 p.m.
Stephen Dillon

 In the last decade, queer scholars have turned away from the study of identity and textuality to consider the role of affect and emotion in the production, circulation, and regulation of sexuality, race, and gender. This course examines a new body of work in queer studies, feminist studies, and sexuality studies that explores emotion and affect as central to operation of social, political, and economic power. Topics will include, mental illness, hormones, happiness, sex, trauma, labor, identity, and social movements, among others. Students will work to consider how emotions and affect are connected to larger systems of power like capitalism; white supremacy; heteropatriarchy; terrorism and war; the prison; the media; and medicine.

CSI 231 – Feminism’s Sciences
Tuesday  12:30-3:20 p.m.
Angie Willey

For decades now feminists have insisted on the importance of thinking about science, nature, and embodiment to understanding the worlds in which we live and to imagining other worlds. I use "feminism's sciences" here to refer to the sciences feminists have critiqued, revised, reinterpreted, and reclaimed as well as to those feminist knowledge-making projects that have been excluded from the definition of science. The class will draw the parameters of feminist sciences wide here to include epistemological, methodological, conceptual, metaphysical, and other critical-creative insights of a wide range of feminist theories and projects. We will read about feminist concerns with knowledge, power, and embodiments to explore possibilities for a contemporary queer feminist materialist science studies. This class will be reading and research intensive. We will explore rich debates in feminist theories of science and materiality over the last several decades and today. You will practice interdisciplinary research as well as developing both written and oral communication skills.

CSI 261 – Using Stories of Powerhouse Women in Businses to Eplore and Challenge the Wage, Confidence, and Funding Gaps
Monday 1:00-3:50 p.m.
Dawn Leaks

Since 1982 women have earned college degrees at a higher rate than men. Yet in 2015, female full-time workers made only 80 cents for every dollar earned by men, and in 2016 only 4.2% of Fortune 500 CEOs were women. In venture capital-financed, high-growth technology startups, only 9% of entrepreneurs are women. This course is designed to provide students with ideas, information and insights about women's experiences in business. The course will look at profiles of successful women as well as women's experiences both historically and currently, exploring the dynamics of power, leadership and access, and considering how this may inform and shape strategies to change the landscape for women in business. Joining us throughout the semester will be a range of women who have successfully navigated careers in the business world. Students in the course will also learn about their own leadership styles, through study of the enneagram. When people study the Enneagram, they see that there are many valid perspectives. The Enneagram is used to enhance communication, leadership skills and team interaction.

CSI 267 – Labor Economics
Wednesday  2:30-5:20 p.m.
Lynda Pickbourn

Component

This course provides students with an introduction to major conflicting economic theories of labor markets, employment and unemployment and will examine the extent to which these theories are borne out by both statistical and qualitative studies of labor in a major capitalist economy such as the US. You will learn some history of labor in the United States, but throughout the course we will try to evaluate the quality of the evidence for alternative ways of understanding labor in the American economy. We will use a variety of methods in our study: statistical and graphical summaries of economic and social indicators; ethnographic descriptions of work in the factories, offices, laboratories, and hospitals of the modern economy; historical narratives about the development and transformation of labor in the United States; and economic arguments based on principles of social or individual behavior. Our analytical tools will include statistical methods, race, gender and class analysis as well as the analytical tools of neoclassical economics. Labor issues such as the growth of part-time/flexible employment; low wages, unemployment, gender and racial discrimination, wage and income inequality and unpaid labor will be discussed along with debates around minimum wages, immigration and labor unions. At least one year of college-level work is required enrollment in this class.

CSI 274 – Cuba:  Revolution and its Discontents
Thursday  12:30-3:20 p.m.
Margaret Cerullo/R. Cardenas

Component

This course proposes an interdisciplinary approach that critically engages a range of frameworks (geopolitical, historical, cultural) for a study of the complex and contested reality of Cuba. Displacing images of Cuba circulating in US popular and official culture, we examine the constructions of race, gender, and sexuality that have defined the Cuban nation. We will explore how Cuba can be understood in relation to the U.S., and to its own diasporas in Miami and elsewhere. The course will engage with primary texts, historiography, literature, film, and music to examine Cuba within these multiple frameworks. Students will complete frequent short response essays and a research project. This course is required for students wishing to study in the Hampshire in Cuba semester program (open to all Five College students), and will provide support for framing independent projects and applications for the Cuba Semester. Though conducted in English, many readings will be available in Spanish and English and papers may be submitted in either language. Concurrent enrollment in a Spanish language class is strongly recommended.

CSI 279 – Feminist, Queer, and Trans Theories of Race
Tuesday, Thursday  12:30-1:50 p.m.
Stephen Dillon

This course examines how scholars in feminist, queer, and transgender studies theorize the politics of race, racialization, and white supremacy. Focusing primarily on the racial state in the United States, we will examine the ways race, gender, and sexuality emerged out of colonization, enslavement, incarceration, immigration, science, and the law. Students are expected to have some familiarity with theories and histories of race, gender, and sexuality. Students should also be prepared to engage a variety of written texts ranging from poetry and memoir to dense, difficult theoretical essays.

CSI 284 – Is Inequality Making us Sick?  A Biocultural Approach to Health in the U.S.
Tuesday, Thursday  12:30-1:50 p.m.
Pam Stone

component

The main goal of this course is to examine inequality in the context of sickness and health in the United States. Using a biocultural perspective, the synergistic interface of biology and culture provides a framework for how to examine health in an interdisciplinary manner. We will examine the ways in which inequality engenders ill health, is socially constructed, and the important role that social institutions, ideology, and cultural and medical practices play in creating and perpetuating various forms of inequality. Using a series of case studies that will clarify the way to go about studying inequality and health, students will examine diverse health experiences and the ways in which culture constructs perceptions of health and effective delivery of health care. We also examine the role the medical research plays in setting health care agendas. Students will finish the term with a clearer understanding how health inequalities are generated and perpetuated, and how to think critically about their own health choices.

HACU 221 – The Regulation of Race, Sex, and Disability in the U.S.
Tuesday, Thursday  10:30-11:50 a.m.
Suzana Loza

Since its founding, the US has closely regulated the bodies of Others and punished those that rebel against these socially-constructed designations. Utilizing an interdisciplinary amalgam of Critical Race Theory, Sexuality Studies, Queer Theory, Media Studies, Sociology, American Studies, Performance Studies, and Feminist Theory, this course will explore how the state, the media, and civilian institutions police the boundaries of race, gender, and sexuality by pathologizing, criminalizing, and stigmatizing difference. We will also examine how the subjects burdened with these dangerous inscriptions evade and contest them through passing, performativity, and other forms of identity-based resistance. Special attention will be paid to the criminalization of cross-racial and same sex desire; the re-biologization of racial and sexual difference; the dehumanization of immigrants; the racialization of crime; the gendering of mental disorder; the rise of homonormativity; genetic surveillance; the biopolitics of reproduction; and the role of The Law in constructing and controlling deviant bodies.

HACU 271 – Pussy Grabs Back:  Knowledge, Woman Power, and Art the Contemporary Americas
Thursday  6:00-9:00 p.m.
Alexis Salas

Knowledge is often described as penetrative and ideas as seminal. This course is a challenge to patriarchal frameworks of bodies, histories, and, ideas. We examine discourses of woman power in both Latin, Central, and North America. In studying transnational, transgender, and transgenerational works, we consider the tension between allies in the destabilized discourses of the "female" (a term itself that will be put into question) body. Using tools from queer theory, Latin American studies, women's, gender, and sexuality studies, critical race studies, as well as media and visual culture studies; it considers practices often based in humorous, low-tech, and clever practices. Topics addressed and theoretical frameworks include the menstrual taboo, sex work, raunch aesthetics, cannibalism, femicidios, the ni una menos movement, and vaginal cosmetic surgery. These readings will inform discussion of works such as performance art, conceptual practices, casta paintings, public actions, music videos, and fine art.

GNDST 204CW – Androgyny and Gender Negotiation in Chinese Theater
Wednesday  1:15-4:05 p.m.
Y. Wang

Yue Opera, an all-female art that flourished in Shanghai in 1923, resulted from China's social changes and the women's movement. Combining traditional with modern forms and Chinese with Western cultures, Yue Opera today attracts loyal and enthusiastic audiences despite pop arts crazes. We will focus on how audiences, particularly women, are fascinated by gender renegotiations as well as by the all-female cast. The class will read and watch classics of this theater, including Romance of the Western BowerPeony Pavilion, and Butterfly Lovers. Students will also learn the basics of traditional Chinese opera.

GNDST 204TR - Trans* Identities and Communities: Genealogy, Theory, Praxis and Community Research
Monday, Wednesday 11:00-12:15 p.m.
Ren-yo Hwang

This course will investigate knowledge/cultural production produced by trans* communities, particularly those multiply impacted by categories of race, gender, sexuality, class, ability, citizenship and location. To understand the critical feminist genealogy/insurgency in which transgender studies/activism have become a field/site of political discourse, we will explore the overlaps and tensions between women/queer/trans* of color activism and theory. Using experimental and multimedia archives of affect, grief, desire, love, liberation and identitarian contradictions, we will ask how counter genealogies as process can transform how we relate to and inhabit power, futurity and memory.

 

GNDST 206US – U.S. Women’s History Since 1890
Tuesday, Thursday  8:35-9:50 a.m.
Mary Renda

This course introduces students to the major themes of U.S. women's history from the 1880s to the present. We will look both at the experiences of a diverse group of women in the U.S. as well as the ideological meaning of gender as it evolved and changed over the twentieth century. We will chart the various meanings of womanhood (for example, motherhood, work, the domestic sphere, and sexuality) along racial, ethnic, and class lines and in different regions, and will trace the impact multiple identities have had on women's social and cultural activism.

GNDST 210JD – Women and Gender in Judaism
Tuesday, Thursday  1:15-2:30 p.m.
TBA

This course examines gender as a key category in Jewish thought and practice. We will examine different theoretical models of gender, concepts of gender in a range of Jewish sources, and feminist Jewish responses to those sources.

GNDST 221QF – Feminist and Queer Theory
Tuesday, Thursday 2:40-3:55 p.m.
Christian Gundermann

We will read a number of key feminist texts that theorize sexual difference, and challenge the oppression of women. We will then address queer theory, an offshoot and expansion of feminist theory, and study how it is both embedded in, and redefines, the feminist paradigms. This redefinition occurs roughly at the same time (1980s/90s) when race emerges as one of feminism's prominent blind spots. The postcolonial critique of feminism is a fourth vector we will examine, as well as anti-racist and postcolonial intersections with queerness. We will also study trans-theory and its challenge to the queer paradigm.

GNDST 240RP – Race, Racism, and Power
Wednesday  8:35-9:50 a.m.
Vanessa Rosa

This course analyzes the concepts of race and racism from an interdisciplinary perspective, with focus on Latinas/os/x in the United States. It explores the sociocultural, political, economic, and historical forces that interact with each other in the production of racial categories and racial "difference." In particular, we focus on racial ideologies, racial formation theory, and processes of racialization, as well as the relationship between race and ethnicity. The course examines racial inequality from a historical perspective and investigates how racial categories evolve and form across contexts. The analysis that develops will ultimately allow us to think rigorously about social inequality, resistance and liberation.

GNDST 241 HP/ANTHR 216HP – Feminist Health Politics
Tuesday, Thursday  1:15-2:30 p.m.
Jacquelyne Luce

Health is about bodies, selves and politics. We will explore a series of health topics from feminist perspectives. How do gender, sexuality, class, disability, and age influence the ways in which one perceives and experiences health and the access one has to health information and health care? Are heteronormativity, cissexism, or one's place of living related to one's health status or one's health risk? By paying close attention to the relationships between community-based narratives, activities of health networks and organizations and theory, we will develop a solid understanding of the historical, political and cultural specificities of health issues, practices, services and movements.

GNDST 333BT/CST 349BT – The Body Toxic: Narratives of Race, Disability and Illness
Monday 2:40-3:55 p.m.
Jina Kim

This course examines the intersections of race, disability, illness, and health using literature and culture as primary sites of engagement. Looking to writers like Audre Lorde, Anna Deavere Smith, Mia Mingus, Harriet Jacobs, and Indra Sinha, it asks how structures of racial, environmental, and economic inequity transform the category of disability, which critics have primarily defined in terms of whiteness. It also considers alternate conceptions of health--models that do not align with mandates of productivity or normative embodiment--offered by the texts under consideration, and asks what political/ social liberation might look like when able-bodiedness is no longer privileged.

GNDST 333EG/ANTHR 316EG – Eggs and Embryos:  Innovations in Reproductive and Genetic Technologies’
Friday 1:15-4:05 p.m.
Jacquelyne Luce

This seminar will focus on emerging innovations in the development, use and governance of reproductive and genetic technologies (RGTs). How do novel developments at the interface of fertility treatment and biomedical research raise both new and enduring questions about the'naturalness' of procreation, the politics of queer families, the im/possibilities of disabilities, and transnational citizenship? Who has a say in what can be done and for which purposes? We will engage with ethnographic texts,documentaries, policy statements, citizen science activist projects, and social media in order to closely explore the diversity of perspectives in this field.

GNDST 333GS – Gender and Sexual Minority Health
Monday, Wednesday  8:35-9:50 a.m.
C. Flanders

This course is a critical overview and investigation of health as it relates to the experiences of gender and sexual minority people. We will begin with exploring theoretical understandings of health and marginalization, and use those as frameworks to examine various domains of health. Areas of interest will include mental health, sexual and reproductive health, substance use, disability, and issues related to body size and image. We will end by looking at other structural issues that affect gender and sexual minority health, such as access to care, health education, and health policy.

GNDST 333NT/CST 349 - Entangled Sexuality: Violence, Resistance, Crime, Punishment And Survival
Wednesday 7:00-9:50 p.m.
Ren-Yo Hwang

Sexuality via current US law is largely conceived of as a singular identity axis, existing independently of other categories and social phenomena. Through critical queer, critical race and settler colonial theory, this course will study the concepts of sexual citizenship/respectability in relation to criminality of "deviant" sexualized, racialized, colonized bodies. In turn, we will explore recent modes of LGBT legal reform -- or rather "carceral feminisms" and "pink-washing." Lastly, we will focus on the unprecedented rate in which women/queer/trans people of color experience violence from the criminal justice system and its law enforcers, even in cases of survival and self-defense.

GNDST 333SA – Women and Gender in Modern South Asia
Wednesday  1:15-4:05 p.m.
K. Datla

This colloquium will explore the history of South Asia as seen from women's perspectives. We will read writings by women from the ancient period to the present. We will focus on the diversity of women's experiences in a range of social, cultural, and religious contexts. Themes include sexuality, religiosity, rights to education and employment, violence against women, modernity and citizenship--in short, those issues central to women's movements in modern South Asia. In addition to the textual sources, the course will analyze Indian popular film and the representation of women in this modern visual genre.

GNDST 333MC – Latina/os/x and Housing:  Mi Casa is Not Su Casa
Tuesday, Thursday  1:15-2:30 p.m.
D. Hernandez

Housing is closely tied to quality of life and the health of neighborhoods and communities. As a main goal of the "American Dream," homeownership has important significance on an individual and societal level. For immigrants, this goal is often out of reach as a result of racism and discriminatory housing policies. This interdisciplinary seminar explores Latinas/os/x relationship to housing and homeownership by examining: 1. the history of housing policy in the United States; 2. national identity, assimilation, and housing; and 3. discriminatory housing policies/programs and housing inequality. We explore topics including immigration, housing policy, public housing, segregation, gentrification, the suburbs, homelessness, eviction, affordability, and community building. Exploring this range of topics will help us develop a clearer understanding of why housing is one of the most pressing issues for Latinas/os/x today.

GNDST 333UU – Latino/a Immigration
Tuesday, Thursday  1:15-2:30 p.m.
D. Hernandez

The course provides an historical and topical overview of Latina/o migration to the United States. We will examine the economic, political, and social antecedents to Latin American migration, and the historical impact of the migration process in the U.S. Considering migration from Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean, we will discuss the social construction of race, the gendered nature of migration, migrant labor struggles, Latin American-U.S. Latino relations, immigration policy, and border life and enforcement. Notions of citizenship, race, class, gender, and sexuality will be central to our understanding of the complexity at work in the migration process.

 

SWG 200 – The Queer 90’s
Monday, Wednesday 1:10 – 2:30 p.m.
Jennifer DeClue

In this course we will immerse ourselves in the 1990s, looking specifically at the emergences and points of contention that made the ‘90s a queer, radical, deeply contested decade. The Queer 90s examines the moment in lesbian and gay studies when the recuperation of the term “queer” emerged. By engaging with the readings and films assigned in this course students will gain an understanding of the AIDS crisis and the rage that mobilized ACT UP.  Students will learn what the Culture Wars, Welfare Reform, and the conservative attacks against the National Endowment for the Arts have to do with one another.  In order to grasp the charged feeling, the urgency, the upheaval of this era we will read foundational queer theoretical texts and analyze a selection of films from the movement known as New Queer Cinema.

SWG 204 – This Bridge Called me Back:  Women of Color Cultural Production
Tuesday, Thursday 10:30-11:50 a.m.
L. Fugikawa

This course examines personal narrative, literature, visual art and performance created by women of color in North America to understand ideas of identity, belonging and difference. We study the formation of women of color feminism from the 1970’s to the present through an interpretation of cultural forms, looking specifically at categories of race, indigeneity, gender, sexuality and class. We analyze how women of color authors and artists articulate frameworks of intersectionality, hybridity, coalition and liberation. Students write both a personal narrative essay and an analytical essay and have the option of completing a creative project.

SWG 222 – Gender, Law and Policy
Monday, Wednesday, Friday  11:00-12:10 p.m.
Carrie Baker

This course explores the impact of gender on law and policy in the United States historically and today, focusing in the areas of constitutional equality, employment, education, reproduction, the family, violence against women, and immigration. We study constitutional and statutory law as well as public policy. Some of the topics we will cover are sexual orientation and gender identity discrimination, pregnancy/caregiver discrimination, pay equity, sexual harassment, school athletics, marriage, sterilization, contraception and abortion, reproductive technologies, sexual assault, intimate partner violence, and gender-based asylum. We will study feminist efforts to reform the law and examine how inequalities based on gender, race, class and sexuality shape the law. We also discuss and debate contemporary policy and future directions.

SWG 324 – Queering Displacement:  Race, Sexuality and Space
Tuesday  1:00-2:50 p.m.
L. Fugikawa

This is an upper-level interdisciplinary seminar that draws from contemporary theories of race, gender and sexuality to examine the relationship between specific communities and state-sanctioned displacements in the 20th and 21st centuries. What is the relationship between spaces such as reservations, inner cities, prisons and housing projects and the state’s intent to manage non-normative bodies? How are removal and displacement deployed as strategies to eradicate queer bodies? In this course, we explore how raced and sexualized bodies are constructed as a threat and what kinds of state power and cultural power mobilized to contain the threats.

AFR 202 – The Black Archive
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:20 p.m.
Samuel Ng

Component

Why has the construction of archives that center on the experiences of people of African descent been so critical to black political, cultural, and social life? What do black archives look like and what do they offer us? How do they expand the way we consider archives in general? This course seeks to address these questions by examining the conception and development of black archives, primarily, although not exclusively, as they arose in the United States across the twentieth century.

AFR 212 – Family Matters:  Representations, Policy and the Black Family
Monday, Wednesday  1:10-2:30 p.m.
TBA

Component

In this course we examine contemporary African-American families from both a sociocultural and socioeconomic perspective. We explore the issues facing African-American families as a consequence of the intersecting of race, class and gender categories of America. The aim of this course is to broaden the student’s knowledge of the internal dynamics and diversity of African-American family life and to foster a greater understanding of the internal strengths as well as the vulnerabilities of the many varieties of African-American families.

AFR 360/ENG 323 – Toni Morrison
Tuesday  1:00-2:50 p.m.
TBA

This seminar focuses on Toni Morrison’s literary production. In reading her novels, essays, lectures and interviews, we pay particular attention to three things: her interest in the epic anxieties of American identities; her interest in form, language, and theory; and her study of love.

AMS 240 – Introduction to Disability Studies
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:20 p.m.
Sara Orem

Component

This course serves as an introductory exploration of the field of disability studies. It asks: how do we define disability? Who is disabled? And what resources do we need to properly study disability? Together, students investigate: trends in disability activism, histories of medicine and science, conceptions of “normal” embodiment, the utility of terms like “crip” or disabled” and the representation of disability in culture.

ANT 353 – Citizenship & Belonging
Tuesday  1:00-2:50 p.m.
Caroline Melly

Component

What does it mean to belong—to a city, a nation, a global community—from an anthropological perspective? How do passports, blood tests, border checkpoints, and voting ballots produce and reinforce ideas about citizenship? How are global movements of people and capital transforming notions of belonging? How does globalization challenge conventional understandings of citizenship as a particular relationship to a nation-state? This seminar considers the political, cultural and economic dimensions of citizenship and belonging. Our perspective is global and takes into account both national and transnational identities and practices.

ANT – Urban Anthropology
Monday, Wednesday  1:10-2:30 p.m.
Caroline Melly

Component

This course considers the city as both a setting for anthropological research and as an ethnographic object of study in itself. We aim to think critically about the theoretical and methodological possibilities, challenges and limitations that are posed by urban anthropology. We consider concepts and themes such as urbanization and migration; urban space and mobility; gender, race and ethnicity; technology and virtual space; markets and economies; citizenship and belonging; and production and consumption.

ART 374 – Gender, Sexuality and the Built Environment
Thursday  1:00-4:00 p.m.
Laura Kalba

This course investigates how gender and sexuality are simultaneously constitutive of, and constituted by, the built environment. Approaching the topic from the perspective of 19th- and 20th-century art and architectural history in the United States and Europe, the course addresses several interrelated questions: How have women shaped the built environment? What role has gender played in shaping dominant understandings of private and public spheres? What role does space play in defining socially acceptable and unacceptable sexual relationships? Finally, how is our understanding of these issues informed by depictions of gender, sexuality and the built environment in painting, photography and film?

CLT 205 – 20th Century Literatures of Africa
Tuesday, Thursday  10:30-11:50 a.m.
Katwiwa Mule

Component

A study of the major writers and diverse literary traditions of modern Africa with emphasis on the historical, political and cultural contexts of the emergence of the writing, reception and consumption. We pay particular attention to several questions: in what contexts did modern African literature emerge? Is the term “African literature” a useful category? How do African writers challenge Western representations of Africa? How do they articulate the crisis of independence and postcoloniality? How do women writers reshape our understanding of gender and the politics of resistance? Writers include Chinua Achebe, Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Chimanda Ngozi Adichie, Nadine Gordimer, Njabulo Ndebele and Ama Ata Aidoo. We also watch and critique films such as Blood DiamondDistrict 9, Tsotsi and The Constant Gardener.

CLT 204 – Queering Don Quixote
Monday, Wednesday  1:10-2:30 p.m.
Reyes Lazaro

This course is devoted to a slow reading of Don Quijote de la Mancha (1605–15), allegedly the first and most influential modern novel. Our approach to this hilarious masterpiece by Cervantes is through a “queering” focus, i.e., as a text that exposes all sorts of binary oppositions (literary, sexual, social, religious and ethnic), such as: high-low, tradition vs. individual creativity, historical vs. literary truth, man vs. woman, authenticity vs. performance, Moor vs. Christian, humorous vs. tragic. The course also covers the crucial role played by Don Quixote in the development of modern and postmodern novelistic concepts (multiple narrators, fictional authors, palimpsest, dialogism) and examples of its worldwide impact. With an optional 1-credit course in Spanish (SPN 356) for those who want to perfect their linguistic and literary skills by reading, translating and commenting selected sections of Miguel de Cervantes’ masterpiece and additional secondary literature in Spanish.

CLT 239/EAL 239 – Intimacy in Contemporary Chinese Women’s Fiction
Monday, Wednesday  1:10-2:30 p.m.
Sabina Knight

How do stories about love, romance and desire (including extramarital affairs, serial relationships and love between women) challenge our assumptions about identity? How do pursuits, successes and failures of intimacy lead to personal and social change? An exploration of major themes through close readings of contemporary fiction by women from China, Taiwan, and Chinese diasporas. Readings are in English translation and no background in China or Chinese is required.

CLT 342 – A Double Vision:  Heroine/Victim
Thursday  3:00-4:50 p.m.
Maira Banerjee

We examine how the iconic status of woman as moral redeemer and social pathbreaker is shadowed by a darker view of female self and sexuality in some representative works by male authors of the Russian 19th century. The primary texts are Pushkin’s Eugene Onegin, Turgenev’s On The Eve, Chernyshevsky’s What Is To Be Done?, Dostoevsky’s A Gentle Spirit and Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina and the Kreutzer Sonata. These novelistic narratives are supplemented with theoretical essays by Belinsky, J.S. Mill, Schopenhauer and Vladimir Soloviev.

EAL 242 – Modern Japanese Literature
Tuesday, Thursday 3:00-4:20 p.m.
Kimberly Kono

Component

A survey of Japanese literature from the late 19th century to the present. Over the last century and a half, Japan has undergone tremendous change: rapid industrialization, imperial and colonial expansion, occupation following its defeat in the Pacific War, and emergence as a global economic power. The literature of modern Japan reflects the complex aesthetic, cultural and political effects of such changes. Through our discussions of these texts, we also address theoretical questions about such concepts as identity, gender, race, sexuality, nation, class, colonialism, modernism and translation. All readings are in English translation.

ENG 290 – Crafting Creative Nonfiction:  Writing Women
Thursday  1:00-2:50 p.m.
TBA

Women have historically exerted their voice and power through writing, even as the professional trades of journalism and publishing have historically been unwelcoming of their presence. This class examines reporting and writing by and about women, and engage students in the practice of writing about gender, feminism, and women’s lives. Students produce their own researched and reported magazine-style project, while inspecting how the media represents feminist issues and analyzing the works of other writers who have probed women’s conditions and concerns. We grapple with questions of reportage, structure, ethical obligations to one’s subject, fair representation, and more.

ENG 391 – Modern South Asian Writers in English
Tuesday  1:00-3:30 p.m.
Ambreen Hai

We study key texts in the diverse tradition of 20th- and 21st-century South Asian literature in English, from the early poet Sarojini Naidu to internationally acclaimed contemporary global and diasporic writers from India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal. Topics include: the postcolonial fashioning of identities; Independence and Partition; women’s interventions in nationalist discourses; the crafting of new English idioms; choices of genre and form; the challenges of historiography, trauma, memory; diaspora and the (re)making of “home;” life post-9/11 Islamophobia. Writers include: Anand, Narayan, Manto, Rushdie, Attia Hosain, Arundhati Roy, Jhumpa Lahiri, Kiran Desai, Naqvi, Adiga, Upadhyay. Supplementary readings on postcolonial theory and criticism. By permission of the instructor.

ESS 340 – Women’s Health:  Current Topics
Tuesday  1:00-2:50 p.m.
Barbara Breham-Curtis

A seminar focusing on current research papers in women’s health. Recent topics have included reproductive health issues, eating disorders, heart disease, depression, autoimmune disorders and breast cancer.

FMS – 248 – Women and American Cinema:  Representation, Spectatorship, Authorship
Monday, Wednesday  1:10-2:30 p.m.
Monday 7:00-11:00 p.m.
Alexandra Keller

This class examines the relation of perhaps the defining American film genre to questions of both American cinema and American identity. How are Westerns reflective and symptomatic of vital issues in United States history and culture? How does the genre help shape and define how Americans think of themselves? How did the genre change over the post-war period, and what does this tell us about the changing needs, ideas and ideologies of both American filmmaking and the United States itself? We will consider the classical films of John Ford and the revisionist work of Sam Peckinpah and Robert Altman, as well as other canonical Westerns, considering the way they were used to think through historical and cultural events like the Red Scare, civil rights and the development of a more robust gay public sphere. We will also consider more recent developments and changes in the genre as produced by Reagan’s tenure as the Cowboy President (including U.S. foreign policy in Latin America).

FRN 380 – Immigration and Sexuality
Monday, Wednesday  2:40-4:00 p.m.
Mehammed Mack

This course explains how gender and sexuality have been politicized in immigration debates in France, from the 1920s to the present. Students examine both cultural productions and social science texts: memoirs, psychoanalytical literature, activist statements, sociological studies, feature films, fashion, performance art, blogs, and news reports. France has historically been the leading European host country for immigrants, a multiplicity of origins reflected in its current demographic make-up. Topics include: the hyper-sexualization of black and brown bodies, France as a Mediterranean culture, immigrant loneliness in Europe, intermarriage and demographic change, the veil and niqab, as well as sexual nationalism and homo-nationalism.

GOV 249 – International Human Rights
Tuesday, Thursday  10:30-11:50 a.m.
Alice Hearst

component

This course examines international human rights and the legal regime designed to protect them. Beginning with a theoretical inquiry into the justification of human rights, the course moves into an analysis of the contemporary system, from the UN to regional associations to NGOs. With that background in place, the course turns to specific topics, including the rights of vulnerable persons (women, children, minority communities, internally and externally displaced persons); human rights concerns arising from globalization and corporate responsibility; environmental concerns; and issues of peacekeeping. It concludes by examining enforcement strategies, from humanitarian intervention to political mobilization to judicial enforcement of rights in both domestic and international tribunals.

GOV 305 – Strange Bedfellows:  State Power and Regulation of the Family
Thursday  1:00-2:50 p.m.
Alice Hearst

component

This seminar explores the status of the family in American political life and its role as a mediating structure between the individual and the state. Emphasis is placed on the role of the courts in articulating the rights of the family and its members.

GOV 363 – Civil Disobedience
Tuesday  3:00 4:50 p.m.
Erin Pineda

component

This seminar in political theory examines the idea and practice of civil disobedience.  Are citizens morally obligated to obey unjust laws?  How do we know when a law is unjust?  What kinds of protest actions are justified?  Is violence ever legitimate?  This course will engage student with these questions by reading classic and contemporary texts from both philosophers and practitioners of forms of disobedience and resistance.  Texts include works by John Rawls, Judity Shklar, Henry Daviid Thoreau, MK Gandhi, Martin Luther King Jr. and Hannah Arendt.

GOV 367 – Politics, Wealth & Inequality
Monday, Wednesday  2:40-4:00 p.m.
Gary Lehring

component

Since Plato and Aristotle, wealth inequality has been the subject of political interrogation. In the last 50 years, most economic benefits have gone to the top 1 percent of the population; corporations and the very rich have paid lower taxes and corporations have received more corporate support from government while federal, state and local budgets for social welfare programs have been cut and working peoples’ salaries have fallen. This course examines and compares what contemporary political theorists and mainstream authors have to say about the connection between wealth, inequality and the health of a political system.

HST 238 - Gender and the British Empire
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:50 p.m.
Jennifer Hall-Witt

Traditionally, historians portrayed the British Empire as the province of male explorers, merchants, missionaries, soldiers and bureaucrats. This course treats such men as gendered subjects, investigating intersections between the empire and masculinity. It surveys debates about white women’s colonial experiences and studies the experience of women who were colonized and enslaved. It examines the gendered structure of racial ideologies and the imperial features of feminist concerns. Focus is on the West Indies, Africa, and India from the late 18th to the early 20th centuries.

HST 265 – Race, Gender and United States Citizenship, 1776-1861
Monday, Wednesday  1:10-2:30 p.m.
Elizabeth Pryor

Analysis of the historical realities, social movements, cultural expression and political debates that shaped U.S. citizenship from the Declaration of Independence to the passage of the Fifteenth Amendment. From the hope of liberty and equality to the exclusion of marginalized groups that made whiteness, maleness and native birth synonymous with Americanness. How African Americans, Native Americans, immigrants and women harnessed the Declaration of Independence and its ideology to define themselves as also citizens of the United States.

HST 280 – Globalization, Im/migration and Transnational Cultures
Tuesday, Thursday  3:00-4:50 p.m.
Jennifer Guglielmo

Explores significance of im/migrant workers and their transnational social movements to U.S. history in the late 19th and 20th centuries. How have im/migrants responded to displacement, marginalization and exclusion, by redefining the meanings of home, citizenship, community and freedom? What are the connections between mass migration and U.S. imperialism? What are the histories of such cross-border social movements as labor radicalism, borderlands feminism, Black and Brown Liberation, and anti-colonialism? Topics also include racial formation; criminalization, incarceration and deportation; reproductive justice; and the politics of gender, sexuality, race, class and nation.

HST – 371 – Remembering Slavery:  A Gendered Reading of the WPA Slave Interviews
Tuesday  1:00-2:50 p.m.
Elizabeth Pryor

Despite the particular degradation, violence and despair of enslavement in the United States, African American men and women built families, traditions and a legacy of resistance. Using the WPA interviews—part of the New Deal Federal Writers Project of the 1930s—this course looks at the historical memory of former slaves by reading and listening to their own words. How did 70- through 90-year-old former slaves remember their childhoods and young adulthoods during slavery? And how do scholars make sense of these interviews given they were conducted when Jim Crow segregation was at its pinnacle? The course examines the WPA interviews as historical sources by studying scholarship that relies heavily on them. Most importantly, students explore debates that swirl around the interviews and challenge their validity on multiple fronts, even as they remain the richest sources of African American oral history regarding slavery.

HST 252 – Women and Gender in Modern Europe, 1789-1918
Monday, Wednesday  2:40-4:00 p.m.
Darcy Buerkle

A survey of European women’s experiences and constructions of gender from the French Revolution through World War I, focusing on Western Europe. Gendered relationships to work, family, politics, society, religion and the body, as well as shifting conceptions of femininity and masculinity, as revealed in novels, films, treatises, letters, paintings, plays and various secondary sources.

IDP 320 – Women’s Health in India, Including Tibetans Living in Exile
Tuesday  7:30-9:30 p.m.
Leslie Jaffee

This seminar examines women’s health and cultural issues within India, with a focus on Tibetan refugees, and then applies the knowledge experientially. During interterm, the students travel to India, visit NGOs involved with Indian women’s health, and deliver workshops on reproductive health topics to students living at the Central University of Tibetan Studies in Sarnath. The seminar is by permission of the instructor; attendance at a seminar info session is required to be eligible to apply. 

SOC 333 – Social Justice, the Environment and the Corporation
Monday  7:30-9:30 p.m.
Leslie King

component

Over the last century, the reach of corporations has gradually extended into all facets of our lives, yet most of us rarely stop to think about the corporation as a social entity. This course focuses on the social, economic and legal foundations that both shape its power and provide a dominant logic for its actions. We examine the implications of corporate power and processes for communities, workers and the environment. We also focus on the ways that governments and various social groups have sought to change corporate assumptions and behaviors concerning their social and environmental responsibilities.

SOC 229 – Sex and Gender in American Society
Monday, Wednesday  9:00—10:20 a.m.
TBA

An examination of the ways in which the social system creates, maintains and reproduces gender dichotomies with specific attention to the significance of gender in interaction, culture and a number of institutional contexts, including work, politics, families and sexuality.

SOC 236 – Beyond Borders:  The New Global Political Economy
Monday, Wednesday  2:40-4:00 p.m.
Payal Banerjee

This course introduces students to the basic concepts and theories in global political economy. It covers the history of economic restructuring, global division of labor, development, North-South state relations, and modes of resistance from a transnational and feminist perspective. Issues central to migration, borders and security, health and the environment are central to the course.

SPP 230 – Maghribi Jewish Women: Cordoba, Casablanca, Tel Aviv
Tuesday, Thursday  1:00-2:50 p.m.
Ibtissam Bouachrine

This course examines constructions and representations of Maghribi Jewish women from the western Mediterranean to Israel. The first part of the course focuses on Jewish women in Andalusi and Maghribi texts. Students are invited to think critically about concepts such as "tolerance," "convivencia," and "dhimma," as well as what it means to be a woman and a religious minority in Muslim-majority communities. The second half of the course examines representations and realities of Jewish women of Moroccan descent in Israeli society. This part centers on questions of immigration, class, demography, gender, diaspora and identity.

SPN 250 – Sex and the Medieval City
Tuesday, Thursday  3:00-4:50 p.m.
Ibtissam Bouachrine

This course examines the medieval understanding of sex and the woman’s body within an urban context. We read medieval texts on love, medicine and women’s sexuality by Iberian and North African scholars. We investigate the ways in which medieval Iberian medical traditions have viewed women’s bodies and defined their health and illness. We also address women’s role as practitioners of medicine, and how such a role was affected by the gradual emergence of “modern” medical institutions such as the hospital and the medical profession.

THE 221 – Rehearsing the Impossible:  Black Women Playwrights Interrupting the Master Narrative
Tuesday, Thursday  10:30-11:50 a.m.
Andrea Hairston

Building on the legacy of Alice Childress, Lorraine Hansberry, Adrienne Kennedy and Ntozake Shange, this course explores the work of Pearl Cleage, Lynne Nottage, Suzan Lori Parks, Anne D. Smith and other playwrights who from the 1950s to the present go about reinventing the narrative of America. We consider their theatrical/artistic production in the context of black feminism. As artists, audiences and critics grapple with the enduring legacy of minstrel storytelling in the late 20th and early 21st centuries, what were/are the particular artistic and intellectual challenges for these theatre artists? What are/were their strategies, missteps, triumphs?