Table of contents from 1990 - 1992


Volume 4 Number 1 - Fall 1992

COAL MINER'S SON
Faith in the power of education has brought Michael Hooker, the new president of the university, a long way from his Appalachian boyhood.

SUCCESSFULL EXPERIMENTS
Bright students from resource-starved high schools spend a summer of scientific discovery in the university's labs.

SHARED VISIONS OF PARADISE
A world-class exhibit of Islamic art attempts to bridge the communication gap between cultures with common values.

GREEN ACRES
At the Hadley Farm, students of veterinary and animal sciences have roots in Mass Aggie past and eyes on the 21st century.

THERE OUGHTA BE A LAW
From classrooms to courtrooms to corporate suites, the legal profession offers something less than equal justice to women lawyers.

FOR THE LOVE OF LLAMAS
Far from the Andes, a couple of New England farmers discover the joys of raising these handsome animals.

WE'RE AN AMERICAN BAND
At their gigs in the Hatch or their star turns in Russian jazz clubs, faculty and alumni musicians swing with the Jeff Holmes Big Band.

PAST, PRESENT & FUTURE
Taj Mahal's music has been attracting attention since his student days in the early sixties, but now he's enjoying stardom Like Never Before.

LETTERS
Angry rowers, friends of the Goodwin family, a foe of James Tate's poetry, thoughts on Columbus yesterday and Latin America today, search for a missing portrait, and other words from our readers.

FIRST IMPRESSIONS
Unita Blackwell wins a MacArthur Fellowship, the Mullins Center gets ready to open, the Annual Fund sets a new record, the AIDS Quilt meets the computer age, a former president's family holds a reunion, and more.

SPORTS
Memories of the fishing team, and the coach behind five Olympic medals.

CLASS NOTES
News of the classes plus a State Department world traveler, an engineer with a light touch, a nurse who helps human parents act like kangaroos, and an artist who wants to tie her work around your neck.

EPILOGUE
Stowell Goding: No need to excuse his French.


Volume 3 Number 4 - Summer 1992

NOW PLAYING AT A CLASSROOM NEAR YOU
In the film studies program, students open their eyes to a world of images that don't make it to theaters at the mall.

GOING HOME TO A TROUBLED LAND
After a long exile, a black South African professor receives a hero's welcome but encounters some harsh realities.

HISTORY GOES PUBLIC
David Glassberg trains his students to think about the study of the past in ways that resonate beyond academia.

THE MENSCH BEHIND THE JERK
Umass theatergoers remember Jere Burns as Romeo; now he's Kirk, the sexist swine we love to hate on "Dear John."

THE NEXT GENERATION
Computers and robots will do some amazine things in tomorrow's factories, hospitals, and public transportation systems. They'll do them first at the new CRICCS research center.

LETTERS
Basketball, basketball, basketball, basketball, basketball, and a few other matters of interest to our readers, including black squirrels, Naval history, and a proven method of staying in touch with old friends.

FIRST IMPRESSIONS
A Pulitzer Prize poet, two Guggenheim Fellows, a new university president, a solution to an ancient Roman mystery, management professors in Poland, the memories preserved in a 40-year-old wallet, the fortunes of the beleagued library, a day in homor of Dick Garber, a $1 million endowed chair, and more.

BOOKS
What is death? How do we live with it?

SPORTS
Ron Villone's fastball makes him a first-round pick in the Major League draft.

MASS GATHERINGS
Look for yourself and your friends in this year's reunion photo album.

CLASS NOTES
News of the classes plus the man who sang "Amen" for Sidney Poitier, an Emmy-winning TV newswoman, a producer with a passion for summer stock, an American executive in the world of French fashion, and a morris dancers's celebration of the AIDS quilt.

COMMENCEMENT
Last year's ceremony was the best one ever. So was this years.


Volume 3 Number 3 - Spring 1992

AT THE CENTER OF THE ACTION
From his vantage point inside a top Washington think tank, Howard Wiarda harbors no illusions about U.S. foreign policy.

BIOLOGY AND DESTINY
A National Science Foundation grant supports Jennifer Pinkham's teaching about the lives of women scientists.

HALF OF THE HUMAN RACE
Who are these women, and why haven't we heard their stories before? Patricia Morris offers a guided tour of the Boston Women's Heritage Trail.

A VISION AND A MISSION
As a student, Heriberto Flores took over university buildings. Now he sits on the board of trustees and channels his passion for social justice into ambitious urban redevolpment projects.

NEW WORLD ORDER
Scholars from many different discilplines set out to rediscover Christopher Columbus and the 1492 ocean voyage that has shaped 500 years of history in Europe, Africa, and the Americas.

SISTERS OF ROSA PARKS
Vicki Crawford brings to light the untold stories of black women in the civil rights movement.

LETTERS
Praise for Frank Lattuca and Mimi Silbert, concern about tuition retention and vanishing credit cards, memories of intramural football in the 1930s and military training in the 1940s, an inquiry from a railroad historian, and other matters on our readers' minds.

FIRST IMPRESSIONS
Basketball brilliance, speaking in many tongues, vintage music, hungry beetles make their bones, black squirrels come to campus, removing obstacles for disabled workers, and more.

VISUAL ARTS
Alan James Robinson pictures the Bard's birds and beasts.

SPORTS
There's nothing soft about the way Holly Aprile plays softball. Plus, saving soccer.

MASS GATHERINGS
Recollections of last year's reunion and a preview of this year's fun.

CLASS NOTES
News of the classes plus a chief judge, a ship's captain, a landscape architect in full bloom, software success in English and Chinese, and the hardiness of the long-distance musher.

EPILOGUE
Before there was a women's studies program, there was Helen Curtis, dean of women.


Volume 3 Number 2 - Winter 1992

BANGKOK BOOGIE
On a jazz mission to Thailand, Frederick Tillis pursues his lifelong interest in the music of other cultures.

DOING WHAT COMES NATURALLY
Untie those jogging shoes, lose that grimly resigned expression, and listen to what this dancer, exercise scientist, and NASA researcher has to say about making exercise an enjoyable part of your daily life.

TWO MINDS OUT OF SOUTH AFRICA
When Nadine Gordimer won the Nobel Prize for Literature, Stephen Clingman's phone started ringing.

HUNGARIAN TALES
An American professor looks at changing times through the eyes of his Budapest writing students.

HELP YOURSELF
Hard-core criminals and drug addicts achieve an extraordinary 80 percent success rate in Mimi Silbert's Delancey Street rehabilitation program.

OUT OF HIDING
A psychologist who specializes in the study of cruelty and kindness recalls his life as a "hidden child" under Nazi occupation in wartime Europe.

MODERN CONVENIENCES
Charlie Nirenberg started out with a small ice cream business, now he's CEO of the Dairy Mart chain.

LETTERS
Understanding breast cancer, praising Lee Varley, remembering campus legends.

FIRST IMPRESSIONS
A new capus landmark, a message to the year 2113, Cambodian nutrition, job-hunting help for alumni, porcupine studies, Nostradamus, and more.

BOOKS
Sex, and how it got that way.

VISUAL ARTS
The subversive photographs of Susan Jahoda.

SPORTS
A player is tested off the basketball court.

CLASSNOTES
News of the classes plus a black belt poet, an Arctic Circle writing teacher, the king of the blueberry hill, and an ex-nun who wants you to have a good laugh. Also Homecoming photos, Clubs & Notices, and more job-hunting help.

ELECTION NEWS
Remember to vote!

 


Volume 3 Number 1 - Fall 1991

FOREST PRIMEVAL
It's like a landscape out of the Brothers Grimm. In Poland's ancient Bialowieza Forest, botanist Edward Klekowski is studying patterns of life and death that date back to the Ice Age.

A WORLD OF HEALING
Biofeedback, hypnosis, meditation yoga - all these techniques have a place in psychologist Bruce Taub-Bynum's multicultural approach to mental health.

THE SIGNS THEY ARE A CHANGIN'
Artist Christopher True '89 infiltrates public spaces with eye-catching messages on authentic-looking street signs.

BLOOD ON THE WATER
In many minds they are simply the menacing killers of Jaws infamy, but Jack Casey '60 says that sharks have far more to fear from humans than we have to fear from them.

THIS REALLY HAPPENED TO A FRIEND OF MINE
Did you hear about the oft-repeated campus legend that everybody takes for fact even though it's just a popular myth?

A WHOLE NEW RECIPE
Disabled trainees cook up employable skills in a special program at the department of hotel, restaurant, and travel administration.

LETTERS
Dealing with depression, appreciating Japan, setting the mayor's record straight, and more.

FIRST IMPRESSIONS
The chancellor talks about the new university, the governer comes to campus, the Annual Fund exceeds its goal, and that's not all.

BOOKS
Setting free the whales.

SPORTS
This short story is no tall tale.

MASS GATHERINGS
Alumni clubs keep school spirit sparking far from campus.

CLUBS & NOTICES
Homecoming, reunion planning, theater, dance, music, cranberries, and other good times.

CLASSNOTES
News of the classes plus a piano-playing environmentalist, an Alaskan nonconformist, a filmmaker, and a TV journalist who makes a difference.

EPILOGUE
English professor Lee Varley carries his passion for Japan into retirement.


Volume 2 Number 4 - Summer 1991

THE MAYOR & THE MOVEMENT
Unita Blackwell '83 MRP, president of the National Conference of Black Mayors and inspiration for a new generation of political activism.

GETTING TECHNICAL
Umass and Digital team up to coach students in the practical art of technical writing.

INNOCENT KILLERS
Lovable, destructable, and endangered, African wild hunting dogs have captivated ecologist Todd Fuller.

BEYOND THE BLUES
Psychologist Bonnie Strickland says clinical depression is common, life-threatening, and treatable.

THE PSYCHOLOGY OF WAR
In researching the roots of good and evil, Ervin Staub sees through the celebration to the suffering.

WHODUNIT?
A most peculiar murder provides grist for the social historian's mill.

ONE IS SILVER AND THE OTHER'S GOLD
Reunion '91 brings out the classes of '41 and '66 for friendship and festivities.

GOING OUT IN STYLE
Seniors picnic, party and dance the night away.

LETTERS
The band, Japan, and the pond bring back memories.

FIRST IMPRESSIONS
A new chancellor takes the helm at a difficult time plus good news; new buildings, more awards, sports heroes!

BOOKS
Paul Theroux writes a riveting portrait of a murderer possessed with remorse.

VISUAL ARTS
Through his art, sculptor Steven Piscitelli exorcises the pain of his Vietnam years.

SPORTS
Fifty-seven years after Lou Bush laid aside his Umass football uniform, his scoring records still stand.

CLASSNOTES
News of the classes plus an artist, an activist, and a pair of apple-growing politicians.

CLUBS & NOTICES
Homecoming, Five College Sea Adventure, Parent's Day, and more.

EXTRA CREDIT
Commencement 1991 - wild and wonderful celebration.


Volume 2 Number 3 - Spring 1991

GENIUS
What does it take to be called a genius and given lots of money? A jazz drummer and literary scholar describe the careers that led to MacArthur Fellowships.

ENDANGERED PLACES
The spotted owl has become the symbol of the Pacific Northwest's threatened primeval forest, but ecologists point out that much more than the bird's survival is at stake.

QUALITY OF LIFE, QUALITY OF CARE
Over a million older American's move into nursing homes every year. A new book offers families a step-by-step guide to choosing the best available home.

THE WIZARD OF RAHS
Maestro-supremo George Parks takes 300 bright-eyed band members on the road.

JAPAN
Ever since William S. Clark in 1876 told his Japanese students, "Boys, be ambitious," a mutually rewarding friendship has flourished between this campus and the Land of the Rising Sun.

LETTERS
The Cold War, animal research, the messy art of writing, and more cheers & jeers for the magazine.

FIRST IMPRESSIONS
Grocery bagging as a political act, real life at NBC, and the war hits home.

FICTION
"Stink," by David Holper '91.

VISUAL ARTS
Painter Richard Yarde calls up his "Holy Ghost(s)."

BOOKS
The Umass Press maps the history of Massachusttes; plus new books by alumni, faculty, and staff.

SPORTS
The short, happy, and airborne career of a gymnast.

MASS GATHERINGS
At the annual Madrigal Dinner, alumni singers get back to the Middle Ages.

CLUBS & NOTICES
Baseball games, buffets, bashes!

CLASSNOTES
News of the classes plus a fast-track drop-out, advances in medicine, and a bikin' DA.

EXTRA CREDIT
Fond memories of waterfowl we have known.


Volume 2 Number 2 - Winter 1991

MANY VOICES
Analyzing nonstandard English as dialect, rather than disorder.

GAMES PEOPLE PLAY
The winning instinct of George Ditomassi '57 has taken him to the top of Milton Bradley.

ON THE EDGE
Biologists are immersing themselves in the problems of polluted coastal waters.

CHALLENGING THE GIFTED STUDENT
The Honors Program celebrates 30 years of student and faculty stimulation and reward.

THE MESSY ART OF WRITING
Finding your voice, letting the juices flow, and then cleaning up the mess.

THE COSTLY ILLUSION OF SECURITY
What price did we really pay for the Cold War?

LIFE IN THE LAB
Researchers try to frame standards for the psychological well-being of captive primates.

LETTERS
Cosby kudos, Reardon razzes, and more.

NEWS AND NOTES
Update on budget upheaval, hot rocks, cool birds, lots more.

MASS GATHERINGS
Collegian reunion marks 100th anniversary.

CLUBS, BULLETIN BOARD
New clubs, more events, get involved!

SPORTS
Midnight madness - part pep rally, part basketball tournament, part Rocky Horror Picture Show.

FICTION
"The Waking of the Carrots," by Bill Meissner '72.

BOOKS
Forked Tongue: The Politics of Bilingual Education, by Rosalie Porter '74, Ed.D. '82; plus capsules of new books by alumni, faculty, and staff.

CLASSNOTES
News of the classes plus Dharma Boogie and other alumni success stories.

HOMECOMING
Soggy but satisfying, torrential but triumphant. The few brave souls who ventured out were amply rewarded.

 


Volume 2 Number 1 - Fall 1990

LETTERS
Recycling, Dr. Cosby, and more.

EXTRA CREDIT
Political cartoons, Lyme disease research.

GRACE UNDER PRESSURE
The university cuts costs, but keeps cool.

IN THE SHADOW OF THE GREEN MONSTER
Jeff Reardon - from Minutemen star to Red Sox relief ace.

PRIOR COMMITMENTS
An acclaimed painter finds his subjects close to home.

WHERE THERE'S SMOKE
American cigarette makers invade Asian markets.

FOOD FALLACY
The cholesterol "hoax," the fiber "fad," and the joy of Mallomars.

NET PROFITS
Fish farming for fun and profit makes ecological sense.

ONE MORE ROUND WITH PAPA
Controversy surrounds a newly published Hemingway story.

IMPASSIONED POETRY
Entering the world of Honduran poet Clementina Suarez.

BOOKS
Shakespeare scholar Kirby Farrell turns mystery novelist.

FICTION
Miracle and mess in the life of an idealistic lawyer.

VISUAL ARTS
A photographic record of centuries-old Massachusetts farms.

NEWS AND NOTES
Alumni leaders meet on campus. Eight new Alumni Association directors. Center for student engineers. Baseball banquet & casino night make fundraising fun. Malawi's protector of endangered species. Speaker of Namibia's parlaiment. Touring the Soviet Union. Your annual fund dollars at work.

MASS GATHERINGS
Rejoicing in memories of the Fabulous Fifties and other happy days.

MASS BAND
Alumni "bandos" toot their old horns.

CLASS NOTES
News from the classes, a playwright, and there she is, Miss Massachusetts.


Volume 1 Number 2 - Spring 1990

LETTERS
Reactions to the new magazine format and more.

EXTRA CREDIT
Birds, bones, bugs, and berries.

REBIRTH OF A NATION
Exiled Hungarian writer Tamas Aczel is welcomed back home.

THE GOVERNOR CHANGES COURSE
Vermont Governor Madeleine Kunin '56 decides not to seek another term.

HOOP-LA!
Basketball fan Jay Neugeboren celebrates the Minutemen's great season.

DANCING FEET AND TRAVELING SHOES
The University Dancers take their show on the road.

THE MONSTER AND THE HOUSEMAID
Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde are seen from the servent's point of view in Valerie Martin's new novel.

A LITTLE BUG WITH A BIG BITE
Bacteriologist Thomas Lessie studies an organism that might be useful in toxic waste clean-up.

BOOKS
The life and times of Winston Churchill by William Manchester '46.

FICTION
Paul Milenski '73 writes about a Polish-American boy and his reunion with his father back from the war.

VISUAL ARTS
Prolific artist John Grillo's pleasure palette.

NEWS AND NOTES
Chancellor Duffey takes on the presidency. Janet Dakin gives "a gem" of a house. Alumni network and learn from the annual Career Day. Alumni scholars are honored. Archive photo exhibit set for reunion.

MASS GATHERINGS
Newscaster Gerry Brooks brings his experience in the media, along with a dose of reality, to students at Van Meter Hall for the inaugural Eleanor Bateman Program.

SPORTS
Lacrosse coach Dick Garber retires this year after putting Garber's Gorillas on the map.

CLASS NOTES
News from the classes plus Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and other unconventional alumni success stories.


Volume 1 Number 1 - Winter 1990

A WORTHY COS
America's most celebrated funnyman gets serious about education, racism -- and comedy.

HO, HO, HO!
On Dasher, On Dancer, on X-mass infractions. On Comet, on Cupid, on class interactions.

MIDLIFE MALARKEY
Cancel that trip to Pago Pago. Midlife crisis may be a myth.

ARMENIA IN AFTERSHOCK
Months after the earthquake, this small Soviet republic is still in ruins.

NO FILTER OF TIME
Researching the life of a South African feminist writer, historian Joyce Berkman finds a kindred spirit.

VISIBLE JAZZ
A tuner's point of view; battered keyboard, broken strings, a composer's ferocious energy.

A CAMPUS DIVIDED
Should university researchers accept money from the Pentagon? Professors on both sides speak their minds.

EXTRA CREDIT
The curtain goes up on an opera for moppets - the premiere of Macchia's "Liombruno." An astonomer turns his gaze from space to the great spaces of the American Southwest. How much is that coyote in the window? Calculating the value of wild critters. A new grip on an old game -- researchers test a redesigned tennis racquet.

BOOKS
An irreverent writer has a field day with classics that never were.

ALUMNI NEWS AND NOTES
President of the Alumni Association, Jack Sweeney, welcomes readers to the new university magazine. Stung by massive budget cuts, students go on strike. Back in the saddle again -- campus police restore horseback patrols. Esther Wallace donates her house to innaugurate the new Faculty Residence Program. Alumni family endows Entrepreneurial Studies Program for SOM. News of the classes.

MASS GATHERINGS
Doing it by the decade -- a new reunion concept kicks off with the Fabulous Fifties. Bulletin Board and Club events.

SPORTS
Water polo team breaks into the national top 20. Scoreboard: men's and women's sports.

INDEPENDENT STUDY
Julius Lester looks for his midlife crisis, and can't find it.


1993 - 1996 1986 - 1989 1983-1985