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Nursing

Nursing | Courses | Faculty

138 Skinner Hall

Degree: Bachelor of Science

Contact: Elizabeth Theroux
Office: 138 Skinner Hall
Phone: (413) 545-5096
Website: www.umass.edu/nursing

Interim Dean: Jean Swinney. Associate Professors Chandler, DeMartinis, Henneman, Jacelon, King, Zucker; Assistant Professors Choi, Kalmakis; Clinical Assistant Professors (full-time) Blood, Cunningham, Curnin, Dion, Dundon, Eckhoff, Green, Hogan, Kent, Lamoureux, Lee, Low, Plotkin, Roche, Stanley, Wolf; Clinical Assistant Professors (part-time) Alsharif, Asselin, Bobianski, Bright, Burris, Callahan, Carroll, Cary, Cassidy, Dickson, Florek, Gage, Gazzillo, George, Gorman, Griffith, Groden, Hutchins, Kilcoyne, L’Heureux, McCaffrey, Moran, Patulak, Powers-Legac, Proulx, C. Roche, Rucki, Rustay, Rousseau, Samuels, Shepherd, Spiro, Steiner, Sullivan, Tehan, Tessier, Thayer; Clinical Instructors (part-time) Anderson, Beaudrey, Costa, Couch, Highly, Tuttle; Adjunct Faculty Azocar, Dole, Donaghue, Falvo, Graves, Jackson-Kohlin, Kenny, Marieb, Nunnelly, Reid-Ponte, Tessier, Wright.

The Field

Nurses help individuals, families, and groups to promote, maintain, or restore optimal health within the context of their environments. Nursing practice requires substantial specialized knowledge of nursing and related scientific, behavioral, and humanistic disciplines. It also involves the development and implementation of strategies of care to accomplish defined goals and the evaluation of responses to care and treatment. Nursing includes the performance of services that promote and support optimal functioning across the life span, collaboration with other members of the health team, health counseling and teaching, the provision of comfort measures, teaching and supervising others, and participation in research contributing to the expansion of nursing knowledge.

The many areas of nursing include community health nursing, parent-child nursing, medical-surgical nursing, rehabilitation nursing, and mental health nursing.

As the complexities of health care have increased and as nurses’ responsibilities have expanded, a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in nursing is essential for today’s professional nurse.

The Major

The School of Nursing offers an undergraduate program leading to the Bachelor of Science degree. This program is approved by the Massachusetts Board of Registration in Nursing, and is fully accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), a national nursing education accrediting body. Completion of requirements qualifies the graduate to take the National Council Licensing Examination in Nursing for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN®), a prerequisite to working as a registered nurse.

The undergraduate program provides the knowledge and skills fundamental to professional nursing. Students emerge from this community-based program prepared for graduate study and able to: develop and sustain therapeutic and collaborative relationships that enhance health and healing; use assessment, communication, and technical skills to design, manage, and coordinate nursing care of clients in the context of environment; use critical thinking in creative problem solving and decision making to provide competent nursing care to clients in the context of resources, current technologies, and outcome-based practice models; provide culturally competent nursing care to clients with diverse backgrounds; provide safe, competent nursing care to clients to promote, maintain, and restore health and prevent illness within the context of environment; design, manage, and coordinate nursing care of clients in collaboration with the interdisciplinary healthcare team using knowledge of healthcare systems and policy and global healthcare concerns; advocate for client, nurse, and profession incorporating ethical theory and professional values of altruism, human dignity, integrity, and social justice; and assume the role of the professional nurse, valuing lifelong learning, continued professional growth, and commitment to excellence.

The Nursing major builds on General Education requirements and courses that provide the foundation for an approach to nursing science that is humanistic and scientific. Self-paced modules, lectures, seminars, clinical simulation in the laboratory setting, and clinical practica are used. Community agencies such as senior citizen centers, schools, ambulatory care centers, community hospitals, and medical centers are used for clinical practice. The faculty assist students in exploring new areas and in laying the foundation for a critical-thinking and problem-solving approach to nursing practice and research.

Students are expected to assume increasing responsibility for their own education by investing in the learning options that best serve their individual abilities, needs, and interests. Under faculty guidance, students provide nursing care to clients of all ages and develop skills in critical thinking, leadership, and research utilization.
Students are required to consult with their assigned academic adviser about the content and sequence of their work each semester and throughout their program and to adhere to the School’s educational policies, as presented in the Undergraduate Student Handbook. Nursing students should follow the required course of studies in consultation with their advisers.

For students completing clinical instruction in the state of Massachusetts, Criminal Offender Record Information (CORI) checks are required and will be completed by the university on all students once they are admitted to the program. Out-of-state students must show evidence that regulations of their state licensure have been met. Progression and clinical placements in the Nursing program may be contingent upon a satisfactory CORI investigation or completion of state requirements.

In addition to graduation, the Massachusetts Board of Registration in Nursing requires that graduates sitting for the NCLEX-RN® licensure exam meet standards of ‘good moral character’. For further information, visit their website at www.mass.gov/dpl/boards/rn for “Rules and Regulations: Determination of Good Moral Character.”

Admission Requirements

Nursing is a major with limited enrollment. High school students interested in the traditional undergraduate track apply through the University Admissions office. Students will be notified of their acceptance to the Nursing major by the university’s Undergraduate Admissions office. Acceptance to the university does not guarantee admission to the Nursing major. A very limited number of positions for on-campus change-of-major students may become available each year on a space-available basis, but there is no guarantee as to the semester in which an on-campus student would be able to enter the program. Criteria for on-campus applicants are available at www.umass.edu/nursing.

Off-campus transfer applicants to the School of Nursing will be reviewed by the university’s Undergraduate Admissions Office and may be considered on a case-by-case basis once qualified on-campus applicants have been accepted.

Standard Undergraduate Curriculum

Clinical nursing courses begin in the first semester of the junior year. Students are required to provide their own transportation to program clinical and community sites, which are used seven days a week, with the potential for evening, weekend, and night hours.

The major builds upon General Education requirements and courses in the humanities and sciences, which provide the foundation for a humanistic and scientific approach to nursing practice. Courses marked with an asterisk must be completed with a grade of C or better to progress in the Nursing major. Lectures, case studies, group projects, seminars, clinical practice, simulated laboratory, independent study, multimedia instruction, Web-enhanced courses, and self-paced modules are all used to present the subject matter of nursing. Clinical practice is arranged under faculty direction with the cooperation of a number of community agencies and health care facilities including senior citizen centers, schools, occupational settings, ambulatory care centers, community hospitals, and tertiary care medical centers.

Students are required to take assessment exams throughout their junior and senior years.

Nursing undergoes dynamic changes because of rapid advances in scientific technology, new trends in delivery of health care, and greater public awareness of health needs. Departmental requirements are subject to change.

A. Plan of Study (subject to change)
First Two Years:

CHEM 110 General Chemistry
PSYCH 100 Introductory Psychology
ENGLWRIT 112 College Writing
KIN 171 Anatomy and Physiology I
KIN 173 Anatomy and Physiology II
NURSING 100 Perspectives in Nursing
NURSING 210 Human Development Throughout the Life Cycle
MICROBIO 255 Introduction to Medical Microbiology
NUTRITN 130 Nutrition for a Healthy Lifestyle or NUTRITN 230 Basic Nutrition
NURSING 301 Pathophysiology
NURSING 312 Cultural Diversity in Health and Illness
PSYCH 380 Abnormal Psychology
Applied Statistics Course
Six additional General Education courses and math requirement by test or course
Elective coursework

B. Final Two Years: Required Nursing Courses

Junior Year
315 Health and Physical Assessment
316 Principles of Nursing Care
325 Maternal-Newborn Nursing (2 cr)
326 Nursing Care of Children (2 cr)
327 Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing (2 cr)
332 Pharmacology in Nursing
397A Writing in Nursing: Ethics
398E Principles of Nursing Care: Practicum (4 cr)
398F Nursing Care of Children: Practicum (2 cr)
398G Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing: Practicum (2 cr)
398I Maternal-Newborn Nursing: Practicum (2 cr)
420 Introduction to Nursing Research

Senior Year
432 Nursing Care of Adults: Acute
433 Nursing Care of Adults: Chronic
438 Professional Role in Nursing
439 Community Health Nursing IV: Community
489 Clinical Practicum IIIA: Community Based Care
498C Nursing Care of Adults: Practicum (4 cr)
498D Clinical Practicum IVA: Community Intervention (2 cr)
498E Nursing Internship (4 cr)
Elective

C. Honors and Other Courses
The School of Nursing offers a departmental honors track in which students can elect to work on research in an area of interest with faculty, and take elective courses. Independent study and special topics courses are also available for students who want to pursue individual areas of interest in nursing.

Curriculum for the Second Bachelor’s Degree

The Second Bachelor’s track is an intensive course of study designed to meet the needs of individuals with a non-nursing bachelor’s degree who are interested in professional nursing.

This challenging, full-time program requires 4 to 5 days per week in classes or in clinical rotations. Significant time for study is required. The program builds on the students’ previous education and prerequisites that provide the foundation for an approach to nursing that is both humanistic and scientific. To meet diverse students’ learning needs, a variety of instructional approaches are used in the classroom, including lectures, case studies, group projects, seminars, simulated laboratory, independent study, multi-media presentations, web-enhanced courses, and self-paced modules. Clinical practice opportunities are offered in acute health care facilities, senior citizen centers, schools, ambulatory care centers, and community hospitals, as well as in clients’ homes. Clinical sites range from Boston to the Berkshires and from Connecticut to Vermont and New Hampshire, and vary each semester according to the availability of both facilities and faculty.

Six prerequisites are required prior to starting the Second Bachelor’s degree track. Up to two courses can be in progress during the fall in which a candidate applies. The overall GPA in the seven prerequisite courses must be a B or better (3.000) with no more than two prerequisites in progress as of September 1. Mid-semester grades are required.

A. Prerequisite Subjects
Human Nutrition
Medical Microbiology w/Lab
Anatomy and Physiology (5-8 cr)
Statistics
Human Growth and Development (across the lifespan)

B. Plan of Study (subject to change)
All courses are hosted in collaboration with the Division of Continuing and Professional Education under the auspices of the School of Nursing.

This full-time program starts with winter session in January, and includes the two summer semesters, from June to mid-August. At least two days per week are devoted to clinical experience in each of the first three semesters, and these can occur on weekends and on day, evening, and night shifts. The coursework is followed by a one-semester internship and online seminar for a total of one and one half years or five semesters for completion, fifty-nine credits. Given the scheduling variability, outside employment is not recommended.

Semester I (Wintersession)
100 Perspectives in Nursing

Semester II (Spring)
301 Pathophysiology
315 Health and Physical Assessment
332 Pharmacology in Nursing
406 Nursing Process (Common Disruptions)
407 Clinical Practice I (4 cr)

Semester III (Summer)
325 Maternal-Newborn Nursing (2 cr)
326 Nursing Care of Children (2 cr)
327 Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing (2 cr)
398F Nursing Care of Children: Practicum (2 cr)
398G Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing: Practicum (2 cr)
398I Maternal-Newborn Nursing: Practicum (2 cr)

Semester IV (Fall)
420 Introduction to Nursing Research
436 Comprehensive Nursing I
437 Clinical Practicum III (4 cr)
439 Community Health Nursing IV: Community
498P Clinical Practicum: Community

Semester V (Spring)
438 Professional Role
498 Internship (9 cr)

Curriculum for Students with R.N.

The RN to BS Track is a fully online course of study offered through the Division of Continuing and Professional Education under the auspices of the School of Nursing. The curriculum is designed for the student with clearly defined career goals and combines Internet/Web-based instruction and student-tailored practice to meet the needs of registered nurses with other life responsibilities. It calls for substantial student autonomy in meeting established objectives. As adult learners with considerable previous experience, students are expected to design activities that will enable them to meet curricular objectives. Successful students are highly self-motivated and disciplined, have a tolerance for ambiguity and change, and a passion for intensive, continual learning. Computer skills and knowledge of the Internet are required. Theory course materials are available on the Web 24 hours a day.

Clinical practice is arranged under faculty direction with the cooperation of community agencies and health care facilities including senior citizen centers, schools, ambulatory care centers, community hospitals, and medical centers. The faculty assists students in exploring new areas and laying the foundation for a problem-solving approach to nursing practice and research. Students are expected to assume increasing responsibility for their own education by choosing the learning options that best serve their individual abilities, needs, and interests. Under faculty guidance, students provide nursing care to clients of all ages and develop skills in critical thinking, leadership, and research utilization.

In order to receive a University of Massachusetts Amherst Bachelor of Science degree, a total of 120 credits must be successfully completed. Sixty-three non-nursing credits must be completed before beginning the online Nursing program; 27 credits are earned in the Nursing program; up to 30 additional Nursing credits can be awarded for NLN Acceleration Challenge Exams (ACE II) and/or previous transfer courses.

A. Prerequisites
Abnormal Psychology
Human Nutrition
Medical Microbiology w/Lab
Anatomy and Physiology
Statistics
Human Growth and Development (across the lifespan)

B. Plan of Study
One- and two-year plans are available.

Semester I (Summer)
312 Cultural Diversity in Health and Illness
397A Writing in Nursing: Ethics
415 Community Focus in Nursing

Semester II (Fall)
315 Health and Physical Assessment of Individuals and Families
440 Vulnerable and Underserved Populations
498S Vulnerable and Underserved Populations: Practicum (2 cr)

Semester III (Spring)
418 Nursing Care of Families
420 Introduction to Research in Nursing
438 Professional Role
498R Nursing Care of Families: Practicum (1 cr)

Academic Regulations of the School
Each student should understand and act in accordance with the philosophy of the School of Nursing, the Code of Ethics as promulgated by the American Nurses Association, and the Academic Honesty policy of the University. Failure to do so will constitute cause for dismissal regardless of academic standing.

All Nursing courses must be completed with a grade of C or higher for graduation in the Nursing major.

Students who do not progress satisfactorily through the nursing curriculum in the regular sequence or who take a leave of absence are not guaranteed that the curriculum and courses from which they departed will be in place upon their return. They will be expected to complete the curriculum of their new graduation date.

Nursing courses may be repeated only once. If an unacceptable grade is received in a clinical course, the student is on probation from the School of Nursing. The student must petition in writing to the Academic Standards Committee to be allowed to repeat the clinical course. If the student is denied a repeat of the clinical course, the student is considered dismissed from the School of Nursing. If a repeat is recommended by the committee, enrollment in a clinical course is on a space-available basis.

Career Opportunities

A career in professional nursing provides opportunities to participate in a profession that affects the nation’s health through the care of citizens in a wide variety of healthcare settings. There is a high demand for baccalaureate-prepared nurses to meet the needs of clients and families in a complex healthcare system. Extensive opportunities exist to develop expertise in a particular area of interest in nursing practice. Students who wish to pursue graduate degrees in nursing, or in the areas of teaching, research or management of nursing, will find that this curriculum offers excellent preparation for advanced study in nursing.

Nursing | Courses | Faculty