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Environmental Conservation

Natural Resources Conservation | Courses | Faculty

225 Holdsworth Natural Resources Center

Phone: (413) 545-2665
Website: http://eco.umass.edu/

Head of Department: Professor Paul R. Fisette. Professors Finn, Fuller, Griffin, Lanza, Juanes, Kittredge, Patterson, Ryan; Associate Professors Barten, Clouston, Damery, Kelty, Loomis, McGarigal, Muth, Randhir, Schweik; Assistant Professors Bradley, Danylchuk, Hoque, Kane, Warren, Whiteley; Lecturer Schreyer; Research Assistant Professor Nicolson.

The department offers three undergraduate programs leading to the B.S. degree: 1) Building and Construction Technology, 2) Environmental Science, and 3) Natural Resources Conservation. The Building Construction Technology major offers practical skills, management training, and hands-on experience to prepare students for career employment in sustainable design and construction. The Environmental Science major aims to provide solutions to current environmental problems by offering a specialization in one of three specific concentrations: Environmental Policy, Environmental Biology, and Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry; students also have the option of a general track of study. The Natural Resources Conservation major provides students with a unique opportunity to specialize in one of six academic concentrations: Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, Fisheries Ecology and Conservation, Forest Ecology and Conservation, Urban Forestry and Arboriculture, Water Resources, and Environmental Conservation. In addition, the department offers a two-year Associate of Science degree program in Arboriculture and Community Forestry through the Stockbridge School, (details of which appear in the Stockbridge section of this Guide and also in the College of Natural Sciences section).

The Department of Environmental Conservation has one of the most comprehensive academic programs in natural resources and environmental conservation in the United States. The undergraduate programs integrate the study of the natural and built environments with the goal of providing comprehensive training and stewardship in conservation and management of natural resources. The academic focus extends from the ecology and management of wild animal populations, trees, forests, watersheds, and landscapes to the physical, social, and policy aspects of conservation involving urban forests, human habitat, and sustainable building. The study of biology, ecology, sociology, policy, engineering, building science, and resource management encompasses concepts and applications related to rural, suburban, and urban environments. The unifying focus of all these activities is on the stewardship and management of healthy and sustainable ecosystems that provide important human and community benefits.

Many graduates seek professional employment in conservation organizations, environmental consulting firms, and the green industry, while others choose a major because of their personal commitment to environmental stewardship and sustainability. Natural Resource Conservation graduates are also prepared for graduate and professional certification programs.

Building and Construction Technology

225 Holdsworth Natural Resources Center

Degree: Bachelor of Science

Contact: David T. Damery
Office: 118 Holdsworth
Phone: (413) 545-1770
Email: ddamery@eco.umass.edu
Website: http://eco.umass.edu/
(See degree programs>undergraduate programs)

The Field

Educating leaders in the field of sustainable design and construction of the built environment is the core mission of the Building Materials and Wood Technology (BMATWT) program. Green building is a rapidly emerging field that will remain an essential piece in the changes that need to occur to combat global warming. Despite the cyclical nature of the construction industry, demand for graduates of the BMATWT Bachelor of Science degree program remains strong, in both the residential housing and the commercial building sectors. Graduates of the BMATWT program take on leadership roles with their understanding of this technically complex field.

Students participate in coursework covering science, technology, business, and design to support the basis for advancing their careers. The design, construction, and in-service use of residential and commercial buildings are complex and BMATWT students are offered a wide array of instruction to cover the necessary elements.

Graduates are involved in virtually every area of building technology including sustainable design practices, energy conservation, wood science, construction and project management, and sales and marketing of building materials. Career paths span technical and research disciplines through sales and construction management. It is the experience of integrating scientific and technical understanding with general business acumen that makes graduates of the program especially desirable to many hiring firms.

The Major

In addition to university General Education requirements, the curriculum in the Building Materials and Wood Technology major builds upon a foundation of introductory mathematics, chemistry, physics, and computer literacy. Department courses cover a background in natural resources plus fundamental courses in building materials technology, wood science, building materials management, and wood-based product technology. The remainder of each student’s program includes electives in areas such as engineering or business according to the individual’s career objectives and chosen curriculum option. Students may prepare for continuation to advanced study at the master’s or doctoral level, but most graduates accept employment immediately.

The functioning student organization is the University of Massachusetts Student Chapter of the Forest Products Society. Close ties with industry are provided through an 18-member Industry Advisory Committee.

Requirements

In addition to university General Education requirements, the Building Materials and Wood Technology major requires completion of the following:

CHEM 110 General Chemistry
MATH courses with R2 designation
NRC 100 Environment and Society
PHYSICS 131, 133 Introductory Physics I with Lab
PHYSICS 132, 134 Introductory Physics II with Lab
RES-ECON 102 Introduction to Resource Economics or ECON 103 Introduction to Micro-economics
ECON 104 Introduction to Macroeconomics
NATRES&E 397A NRE Junior Writing Course
FOREST 492 Verbal Communication Skills
BMATWT 201 Introduction to Wood Science
BMATWT 211 Energy Efficient Housing
BMATWT 220 Introduction to CAD in Construction and Architecture
BMATWT 304 Properties of Wood
BMATWT 313 Light-Frame Structure Technology
BMATWT 314 Architectural Blueprint Reading and Estimating
BMATWT 352 Building Materials and Forest Products Marketing
BMATWT 353 The Business of Building
BMATWT 390N Construction Methods and Materials
BMATWT 392A Seminar in Kiln Drying
BMATWT 397B Design and Construction of a Timber Bridge
BMATWT 492 Building Materials Seminar
BMATWT 530 Mechanics of Building Materials for Construction
BMATWT 540 Design of Wood Structures

Career Opportunities

Graduates of the Building Materials and Wood Technology Program (BMATWT) have risen to the highest professional levels in the building materials industry. Specific occupations cover a broad range of professional careers. They work as retail and wholesale managers, sales associates, researchers, construction managers, marketing professionals, technical representatives, and purchasing agents for the most successful corporations in the nation. Salaries compare favorably with other scientific and business professions. Opportunities for advancement are excellent. The employment demand for women and men in this rapidly expanding field far exceeds the number of graduates.

The Minor

To successfully complete a minor in Building Materials and Wood Technology, a student must earn a minimum of 15 credits, selecting a minimum of five BMATWT courses in the three academic areas listed as follows. Two courses are required from Materials and Methods, and one each from Professional and Management Systems and Information Technology, with one additional course from any of the three areas. All courses listed below are three-credit courses. For admission to the Building Materials and Wood Technology Minor, a student must be in good academic standing with the university.

No requirements for the minor may be taken Pass/Fail. All courses applied toward the minor must be taken on a graded basis and all courses used to satisfy the requirements of the minor must be completed with a grade of C or better.

Materials and Methods area (minimum 6 cr)
201 Introduction to Wood Science
211 Energy Efficient Housing
304 Properties of Wood
313 Principles of Light Frame Structures Technology
390N Construction Materials and Methods
530 Mechanics of Building Materials for Construction
540 Design of Wood Structures

Professional and Management Systems area (minimum 3 cr)
314 Architectural Blueprint Reading and Estimating
352 Building Materials and Forest Products Marketing
353 Business of Building

Information Technology area (minimum 3 cr)
390M Introduction to CAD in Construction and Architecture
452 Building Materials Computing


Environmental Sciences

312 Stockbridge Hall

Degree: Bachelor of Science

Contact: Sandy Barron
Office: 310 Holdsworth
Phone: (413) 545-5226
Email: sbarron@eco.umass.edu
Website: www.umass.edu/envsci/

The Environmental Sciences program offers an interdisciplinary major in the College of Natural Resources and the Environment. Cooperating disciplines are: Food Science; Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning; Microbiology; Natural Resources Conservation; Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences; Resource Economics; Veterinary and Animal Sciences; School of Public Health and Health Sciences.

Program Director: Professor Guy R. Lanza. Contributing faculty: Food Science—Professor Levin; Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning—Professor Ryan; Microbiology—Professors Leschine, Nüsslein; Natural Resources Conservation—Professors Fuller, Griffin, Kittredge; Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences—Professors Bhowmik, Manning, Parkash, Simkins, Vittum, Xing; Resource Economics—Professors Field, Stevens, Stranlund; Veterinary and Animal Sciences—Professors Arcaro, Clark; Lecturers Haynes, Hellem, Marshall, Olock.

The Field

Environmental Sciences employs an interdisciplinary approach to teaching, research, and outreach. Students learn how to meet the challenges of creating a safe and healthy environment and how to recognize and control the impact of pollution and environmental stress on ecosystems. Faculty and students seek practical solutions to complex environmental problems by crossing traditional disciplinary boundaries. Students learn how to integrate and apply knowledge from the appropriate areas of basic science, economics, and policy. Environmental Sciences faculty and students address problems caused by ecosystem degradation from physical alteration of the environment and chemical contaminants from industrial activities, agriculture, food production, and inadequate resource management.

The Environmental Sciences program is the only academic unit on campus providing a B.S. degree in Environmental Sciences. Environmental Sciences faculty teach a series of courses with the ENVIRSCI designation as well as disciplinary courses in their department that apply to the Environmental Sciences major. The curriculum includes innovative course offerings that extend the traditional classroom experience to outreach activities including environmental applications and problem solving in off-campus community settings. Specialty courses expose students to a blend of academic and practical knowledge that includes environmental site assessment (ASTM-EPA procedures), hazardous waste operations and emergency response (OSHA Certification), environmental applications of GIS technologies, and novel approaches to recycling non-traditional waste materials. Environmental Sciences majors are prepared for immediate employment upon graduation or have the option of embarking on graduate studies in environmental biology, chemistry, toxicology, policy, and law.

The Major

All majors take required courses which provide a background in natural sciences, mathematics, and environmental studies. First-year students attend a required seminar to discuss critical environmental issues with faculty and outside speakers.

A core curriculum of four courses and a Junior Year Writing course are also required for all majors. These core requirements provide a solid foundation in the social and scientific aspects of environmental problems. Students learn how to apply scientific data to solve complex environmental problems and to establish coherent environmental policy options to protect and sustain the environment.

A diverse selection of upper-level courses allows students to work with their faculty adviser to design a unique curriculum tailored to their individual interests and needs. Students combine related courses in a General Track of study, or select a specific concentration in: Biology, Health Sciences, Toxicology and Chemistry or Policy.

Environmental Biology—provides an ecological perspective on the relationships and interdependence of organisms in terrestrial and aquatic habitats, with emphasis on the effects of human activities on the biota.

Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry— focuses on the impacts of environmental contaminants on the biota with emphasis on the analytical chemistry, biochemistry, and ecotoxicology of pollutants in the air, water, and soil.

Environmental Policy—applies scientific knowledge to address public policy issues on the environment using economic analysis, regulation, administration, enforcement, and law.

Basic science and math requirements:
BIOLOGY 100, 101 Introductory Biology I, II, or equivalent
CHEM 111, 112 General Chemistry I, II
CHEM 250 Organic Chemistry
CHEM 261, 262/269 Organic Chemistry I, II/Lab
MATH 127, 128 Calculus I, II
RES-ECON 211 Introductory Statistics for the Life Sciences
RES-ECON 262 Environmental Economics
Also recommended: CMPSCI 105 or 121 or equivalent

Required department courses:
112 Fundamentals of the Environment
191A, 194A Introductory Seminars
213 Introduction to Environmental Policy
214 Principles of Environmental Biology
315 Principles of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
NATRES&E 397A NRE Junior Writing Course

After completing core requirements, students choose four upper level courses in the environmental sciences concentration. Students desiring to concentrate within a specific area must select from approved courses within the concentration; students in the general environmental sciences area may select courses from among any approved offerings. Courses associated with the concentrations are:

Environmental Biology
BIOLOGY 283 General Genetics
BIOLOGY 421 Plant Ecology
BIOLOGY 528 Principles of Evolution
BIOLOGY 542 Ichthyology
CE-ENGIN 575 Advanced Solid and Hazardous Waste Management
ENVIRSCI 504 Air Pollution and Climate Change Biology
ENVIRSCI 515 Microbiology of Soil
ENVIRSCI 530 Aquatic Toxicology
ENVIRSCI 535 Methods in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
GEO-SCI 354 Climatology
MICROBIO 310/312 General Microbiology/Lab
W&FCONSV 470 Fish Ecology
W&FCONSV 564 Wildlife Habitat Management
W&FCONSV 565 Dynamics and Management of Wildlife Populations

Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
BIOCHEM 420 Elementary Biochemistry
BIOCHEM 524 General Biochemistry
BIOLOGY 283 General Genetics
CHEM 312 Analytical Chemistry
CHEM 315 Quantitative Analysis
ENVIRSCI 504 Air Pollution and Climate Change Biology
ENVIRSCI 515 Microbiology of Soil
ENVIRSCI 530 Aquatic Toxicology
ENVIRSCI 535 Methods in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
ENVIRSCI 555 Environmental Toxicology in Context
ENVIRSCI 575 Environmental Soil Chemistry
ENVIRSCI 585 Animal and Environmental Toxicology
GEO-SCI 519 Aqueous and Environmental Geochemistry
MICROBIO 310 General Microbiology
MICROBIO 330 Microbial Genetics
MICROBIO 560 Microbial Diversity
PLNTSOIL 555 Urban Environment and Plant Growth
PLNTSOIL 597O Organic Contaminants in Soils, Waters, and Sediments
PLNTSOIL 597X Inorganic Contaminants in Soil, Water, and Sediment

Environmental Policy
ECON 308 Political Economy of the Environment
ENVIRSCI 342 Pesticides, the Environment, and Public Policy
GEO-SCI 362 Land Use and Society
NRC 382 Human Dimensions of Natural Resource Management
NRC 409 Natural Resources Policy and Administration
PLSOILIN 385 Laboratory in Agricultural Biotechnology
POLISCI 382 Environmental Policy
REGIONPL 553 Resource Policy and Planning
RES-ECON 263 Natural Resource Economics
RES-ECON 471 Benefit-Cost Analysis of Natural Resource Programs
W&FCONSV 564 Wildlife Habitat Management
W&FCONSV 571 Fisheries Science and Management

The Minor

The minor in Environmental Sciences is intended for students from related majors who wish to increase their awareness and understanding of the nature of environmental concerns and decision making. It is structured to expose students to the various perspectives of the field. A minor in Environmental Sciences can be earned by completing two core courses plus at least three courses selected from the concentration areas—Environmental Policy, Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, and Environmental Biology and Health—for a minimum total of 15 credits. Students must take at least one course in each concentration area.

1) Select two of the four core courses:
112 Fundamentals of the Environment*
213 Introduction to Environmental Policy
214 Principles of Environmental Biology
315 Principles of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry

*Substitution permitted: ENVIRSCI 101, NRC 100.

2) Select one course from each concentration:

A) Environmental Policy
ENVIRSCI 213 (if not already chosen as a core course)
NRC 409 Natural Resources Policy and Administration
POLISCI 280 Public Policy
POLISCI 382 Environmental Policy
RES-ECON 263 Natural Resource Economics
RES-ECON 471 Benefit-Cost Analysis of Natural Resource Programs

B) Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
ENVIRSCI 315 (if not already chosen as a core course)
ENVIRSCI 504 Air Pollution Biology
ENVIRSCI 515 Microbiology of Soil
ENVIRSCI 530 Aquatic Toxicology
ENVIRSCI 555 Environmental Toxicology in Context
ENVIRSCI 575 Environmental Soil Chemistry
ENVIRSCI 585 Animal and Environmental Toxicology
GEO-SCI 519 Aqueous and Environmental Geochemistry
PLNTSOIL 597O Organic Contaminants in Soils, Waters, and Sediments

C) Environmental Biology
BIOLOGY 421 Plant Ecology
ENVIRSCI 214 Principles of Environmental Biology (if not already chosen as a core course)
MICROBIO 310/312 General Microbiology
MICROBIO 390E Microbial Ecology
PLNTSOIL 555 Urban Environment and Plant Growth

Further details on course work and electives are listed on the program website, www.umass.edu/envsci/ and in the Environmental Sciences: Guide to Undergraduate Studies; copies are available from the Environmental Sciences Program, 312 Stockbridge Hall.

Career Opportunities

The B.S. degree in Environmental Sciences leads to a variety of career opportunities in private industry and governmental agencies concerned with environmental quality assessment, community environment programs, and interagency coordination in environmental quality maintenance. Many majors will continue studies at the graduate level in such diverse fields as environmental microbiology, ecotoxicology, environmental sciences education, environmental engineering, and environmental law.

 

Natural Resource Studies

225 Holdsworth Natural Resources Center

Degree: Bachelor of Science

Contact: Curtice Griffin
Office: 324 Holdsworth
Phone: (413) 545-2640
Email: cgriffin@eco.umass.edu
Website: http://eco.umass.edu/

The Field

The profession of natural resource management is in need of people who are educated to provide a variety of skills that can be used to solve a growing list of problems and issues. Some of those problems are addressed by programs offered in this and other departments of the College of Natural Resources and the Environment. However, most problems require the professional ability to integrate the social and natural sciences, technical management, and social organization in effective programs and actions. Such problems include, for example, planning and managing the coastal zone, rural areas, wetlands, and other water resources.

In Natural Resource Studies (NAREST), conserving and managing resources is considered an interdisciplinary effort; thus, individuals with differing strengths may develop course specialties in environmental fields such as aquatic resources, ecology, human dimensions, natural areas management, and impact assessment. These fields and others may be approached with an emphasis on science, technical management, administration, social policy and action, law, and communications. Individual curriculum planning based on personal career goals, talent, and interest is a special characteristic of the NAREST program. Further, the program is designed for maximum flexibility within the 120 credits required for graduation. A minimum of 47 course credits are selected by the student. In this way, students “design” their personal major.

Students who wish to prepare for entry to graduate school from this curriculum should make the decision early and work closely with their adviser. Specifically, students should identify their professional goal and determine requirements for entry into a specific graduate program. Students must define their own objectives. Some potential graduate programs for which this major is an effective base are: regional planning, law, conservation education, journalism, resource planning, and public administration.

The Major

The NAREST major offers flexible programs of study for students who have specific career goals not met by other natural resource or environmental majors, and who are ready to take personal responsibility for developing their own course of study. The program offers curriculum opportunities for students interested in generalist approaches to resource conservation and management, as well as opportunities for unique, focused, and specialized curriculum plans. Students may, in consultation with their adviser, plan to enter certain pre-professional specialties or prepare for graduate school.

Requirements

Freshmen
POLISCI 101 American Politics
NRC 100 Environment and Society
BIOLOGY 100 and 101 Introduction to Biology
MATH 104 Algebra, Analytic Geometry and Trigonometry
ANTHRO 208 Human Ecology

Sophomores
NRC 212 Forest Botany
CHEM 111 General Chemistry
CHEM 112 General Chemistry or PHYSICS 139 Introduction to Physics
GEO-SCI 101 The Earth
GEO-SCI 131 Experiencing Geology (not required if student has taken GEO-SCI 101)
RES-ECON 211 Introductory Statistics for the Life Sciences
RES-ECON 263 Natural Resource Economics
NAT-RESR 391A Seminar: Curriculum Planning
NRC 297S Introduction to Spatial Information Technologies

Juniors and Seniors
Requirements are met by individualized, student-designed curricula with adviser approval. All majors must take NRC 409 Natural Resources Policy and Administration, NRC 382 Human Dimensions of Natural Resource Management, and NRC 549 Ecosystem Management, and fulfill the Junior Year Writing requirement.

Restrictions
Courses to be counted in the NAREST program must be taken on a graded basis.

Natural Resources Conservation | Courses | Faculty