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Chemical Engineering

Chemical Engineering | Courses | Faculty

159 Goessmann

Degree: Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering

Contact: David Ford
Office: 209 Goessmann
Phone: (413) 577-0134
Email: ford@ecs.umass.edu
or
Contact: Margie Audette
Office: 159 Goessmann
Phone: (413) 545-2507
Email: audette@ecs.umass.edu

Head of Department: Professor T.J. Mountziaris. Undergraduate Program Director: Associate Professor David Ford. Professors Conner, Henson, Malone, Maroudas, Monson, Pozrikidis, Westmoreland, Winter; Associate Professors Bhatia, Davis, Roberts; Assistant Professors Forbes, Huber, Sun.

The Field

Chemical engineers invent, develop, design, and operate processes and devices for bringing about chemical and physical changes in materials. Involved in all stages, they bring laboratory discoveries into new products and processes. Chemical engineers engage in fundamental research, development, economic and market analysis, design, construction, operations, supervision, sales, technical service, and management. Traditional industries such as petroleum refining and petrochemical production, plastics, synthetic fibers and textiles, pulp and paper, and pharmaceuticals employ many chemical engineers. The training of a B.S. chemical engineer provides a very broad background in chemistry, physics, mathematics, and their applications. This broad background enables chemical engineers to be employed in emerging technologies such as biochemical engineering and advanced materials.

The Major

The Chemical Engineering undergraduate program is focused on the achievement of a set of educational objectives: a) to prepare B.S. graduates for careers in the professional practice of chemical engineering and allied professions; b) to prepare qualified students interested in further study for graduate and professional schools; and c) to maintain and develop a faculty with active, high-quality research programs linked to the undergraduate curriculum for its continued improvement. The curriculum is organized around a set of expected program outcomes. Graduates are expected to be able to: apply knowledge of mathematics, science (particularly chemistry), and chemical engineering; design and conduct experiments, and analyze and interpret data; synthesize, design, and optimize systems, components, and processes; function on multidisciplinary teams; identify, formulate, and solve chemical engineering problems; communicate effectively in writing and orally, and use the techniques, skills, and modern science and engineering tools necessary for chemical engineering practice. Students acquire a broad education necessary to understand the impact of chemical engineering systems in a global and societal context; an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility; a knowledge of contemporary issues in chemical engineering; and a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in, lifelong learning.

Admission to the major is contingent upon completing the Engineering Freshman year with an average of C (2.5) with passing grades in the following courses: CHEM 111, CHEM 112, MATH 131, MATH 132, ENGIN 110 (or 111 or 112), PHYSICS 151 and PHYSICS 153. A student must maintain a cumulative average of C (2.000) in the core Chemical Engineering courses to remain in good standing, and to graduate.

The curriculum is designed to afford flexibility in the senior year for elective courses and the opportunity to do an internship. The courses of the last two semesters may be taken interchangeably.

Freshmen
Fall
ENGLWRIT 112 College Writing
MATH 131 Calculus I
CHEM 111 General Chemistry I
ENGIN 110 or 111 or 112 or 113
Social World Elective #1

Spring
MATH 132 Calculus II
CHEM 112 General Chemistry
PHYSICS 151 General Physics I
PHYSICS 153 General Physics Lab
CHEM-ENG 120 or CE-ENGIN 121 or E&C-ENG 122 or M&I-ENG 124 (CHEM-ENG 120 is strongly recommended for the major. It is not required for admission to the major but it is required for graduation.)

Sophomores
Fall
PHYSICS 152 General Physics II
CHEM 261 Organic Chemistry for Non-majors I
CHEM-ENG 291A Professional Development Seminar
BIOLOGY 100 Introductory Biology I
MATH 233 Multivariable Calculus 1
Social World Elective #2

Spring
CHEM-ENG 226 Thermodynamics I
CHEM 262 Organic Chemistry II for Non- majors
CHEM 269 Organic Lab for Non-majors
MATH 331 Ordinary Differential Equations
Social World Elective #3
Social World Elective #4

Juniors
Fall Semester
CHEM-ENG 325 Thermodynamics II
CHEM-ENG 330 Fluid Mechanics
CHEM 475 Physical Chemistry
CHEM-ENG 391A Professional Development Seminar
CHEM-ENG 320 Kinetics and Reactor Design
ENGIN 351 Writing in Engineering

Spring Semester
Technical Elective
CHEM-ENG 333 Heat and Mass Transfer CHEM-ENG 338 Separations
Advanced Chemistry Elective
CHEM-ENG 361 Mathematical Modeling

Seniors
Fall Semester
CHEM-ENG 401 Chemical Engineering Lab I
CHEM-ENG 444 Chemical Process Design I
CHEM-ENG 446 Chemical Process Control
Technical Elective
Social World Elective #5
CHEM-ENG 491A Professional Development Seminar

Spring Semester
CHEM-ENG 402 Chemical Engineering
Lab II or 590A Bioprocessing Engineering Lab
Two Technical Electives
Social World Elective #6

In addition to fulfilling course requirements, all seniors must complete a survey, before graduation, that assesses their undergraduate education.

Notes
1. Mathematics sequence
MATH 131, 132, 233, 331 may be replaced by MATH 135, 136, 245, 246.

2. Chemistry sequence
CHEM 111 and 112 may be replaced by CHEM 121 and 122. CHEM 261, 262 and 269 may be replaced by CHEM 265, 266, 267, and 268.

3. POLYMER 501 or any 3-4 credit Chemistry or Biochemistry course at the 200 level or above.Exceptions: CHEM 250, CHEM 391A, CHEM 471A, and BIOCHEM 471.

Writing Requirement

The successful completion of the Writing requirement will require: Completion of ENGLWRIT 112 with a C or better, Junior Year status in the Chemical Engineering (completion of all requirements up to the Spring Semester Junior Year), and completion of ENGIN 351 with a C or better.

Concentration in Biochemical Engineering

The concentration in Biochemical Engineering is open to students majoring in Chemical Engineering. It provides students with specialized coursework and training to better prepare them for engineering careers in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. The courses for this program fit into the required Advanced Chemistry Elective and Technical Electives that all Chemical Engineering students are required to take. Students must take a total of 15 credits. The following nine credits are required:

BIOCHEM 285 Cellular and Molecular Biology
CHEM 490A Biochemistry for Chemists
CHEM-ENG 592 Introduction to Biochemical Engineering

Students must also take an additional six credits of advanced coursework or research in special topics in bioengineering. These six credits must be engineering courses. Approved CHEM-ENG courses are:
597B Soft Materials and Biomaterials
597C Introduction to Biomolecular Engineering
597D Nanostructured Biomaterials
296, 396, 496 Independent Study in bioengineering
296H, 396H, 496H Honors Independent Study in bioengineering
499Y, 499T Honors Senior Thesis in bioengineering
697A Special Topics: Molecular and Systems Biotechnology
Additional courses may be used to meet this requirement, but advance approval of the Undergraduate Program Director (UPD) is required. Students wishing to fulfill this requirement with an independent study or thesis must gain approval of the topic by the UPD before enrolling for credit. Only three-credit independent study courses may be used to fulfil this requirement.

A typical sequence of courses for students in the program is listed below. Students are strongly encouraged to take BIOCHEM 285 during a spring semester.

Freshman
Fall
ENGLWP 112 College Writing
ENGIN 110 Introduction to Chemical Engineering
MATH 131 Calculus I
CHEM 111 General Chemistry I
Social World Elective

Spring
CHEM-ENG 120 Chemical Engineering Fundamentals
PHYSICS 151 General Physics I
PHYSICS 153 General Physics Lab
MATH 132 Calculus II
CHEM 112 General Chemistry

Sophomore
Fall
PHYSICS 152 General Physics II
CHEM-ENG 291A Professional Development Seminar
BIOLOGY 100 Introductory Biology I
MATH 233 Multivariate Calculus
CHEM 261 Organic Chemistry I
Social World Elective

Spring
CHEM-ENG 266 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics I
MATH 331 Ordinary Differential Equations for Scientists and Engineers
CHEM 262 Organic Chemistry II
CHEM 269 Organic Chemistry Lab for Nonmajors
BIOCHEM 285 Cell and Molecular Biology
Social World Elective

Junior
Fall

ENGIN 351 Writing in Engineering
CHEM-ENG 325 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics II
CHEM-ENG 330 Chemical Engineering Fluid Mechanics
CHEM-ENG 391A Professional Development Seminar
CHEM 475 Physical Chemistry
CHEM-ENG 320 Kinetics and Reactor Design

Spring
Social World Elective
CHEM-ENG 333 Heat and Mass Transfer
CHEM-ENG 338 Separations
CHEM-ENG 361 Mathematical Modeling
CHEM 490A Biochemistry for Chemists

Senior
Fall
CHEM-ENG 401 Chemical Engineering Laboratory I
CHEM-ENG 444 Chemical Process Design I
CHEM-ENG 446 Process and Control Dynamics
CHEM-ENG 491A Professional Development Seminar
Bioengineering Special Topic

Spring
CHEM-ENG 402 Chemical Engineering Laboratory II or Bioprocessing Engineering Lab
CHEM-ENG 592 Introduction to Biochemical Engineering
Bioengineering Special Topic
Social World Elective
Social World Elective

Education Abroad

The Chemical Engineering Department has a formal exchange agreement with University College, London (UK). Students are encouraged to consider participating in the many other exchange opportunities: the Universities of Queensland and Adelaide (Australia), McGill University in Montreal, Universities of Karlsruhe and Stuttgart in Germany, The Indian Institute of Technology in New Delhi, ITESM (Monterey, Mexico), and three universities in the United Kingdom, Kent, Leeds, and Wales/ Swansea. Early inquiry at International Programs, tel. (413) 545-2710, is recommended.

Cooperative Experience

Internships in an industrial setting provide significant advantages to students in their education and in the opportunities available to them upon graduation. The Chemical Engineering curriculum was recently reorganized to minimize the delay in graduation for those students who opt for longer internship experience in the senior year. The University supports internship programs through Career Services.

Chemical Engineering | Courses | Faculty