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Undergraduate FAQ

FAQ

Is auditioning a part of the application process?
No. If you are admitted to the University of Massachusetts Amherst, you do not have to audition to become a major. However, once you declare your major, we do require you to keep up a minimum GPA in theater classes and to complete required classes. See the PDF of our degree checklist in our Useful Links at left for details on required classes.

I'm interested in performance. Why are you making me take lighting design (and dramaturgy classes, and tech crew credits, and...)?
We are proud to offer a BA program, and as such, we take a broad, "liberal arts" view of theater. We think that in order to be effective theater artists, people need to be aware of the many different sides of the theater world. Theater is a collaborative art that improves when all the members of a production speak the same language and work toward the same goal. We also believe that whatever an individual's focus might be, he or she will be stronger in that area for having a knowledge of all the related areas. An actor, for example, might be able to make stronger acting choices based on an understanding of why a lighting designer is choosing certain effects and how they influence the way the audience perceives what's happening on stage. Besides, you might discover a passion for a side of theater you didn’t even know about before!

See our Major page to learn about different areas of theater you can study here.

UMass is HUGE. I'm a little freaked out about getting lost in the shuffle.
We hear you — everyone's a little overwhelmed at first. The Department of Theater will make it easy for you to feel at home, though. In the first week of classes, you'll be paired with a peer advisor, which is a fellow student, likely someone in your area of interest. He or she will be happy, nay, EAGER, to answer your questions about the major, help you find your way around the building, and generally assist you as you learn your way around the department and the University. We also recommend checking on this website and joining our Facebook group to learn about all the getting-to-know you stuff we do at the beginning of the year to help new folks get situated. (For example, keep your eyes peeled for news about a Department Meet and Greet at the start of the fall.)

I am thinking about double-majoring. Can I do that and still finish on time?
We have a lot of double-majors, and many of them do finish in four years. The key is to be goal-oriented and to start working on getting your general education and other required classes completed as soon as possible. You should also be in close communication with your faculty advisor (well, you should do that anyway, really!) to figure out the most efficient and effective way to plan your courses.

What about shows? Do I have to audition for those? And do I stand a chance at getting cast as a freshman? And what if I don't want to major, but I want to act in one of your shows?
Yes! You must audition if you want to be in one of our productions. And yes, you do have a chance at being cast as a freshman or non-major. That said, we don’t want to create an expectation that you’ll get the lead role your first time out. A strong work ethic, a willingness to learn, and a commitment to working supportively with the rest of the cast and creative team are really important to us. If you approach this discipline seriously, and we see that you’re ready to take on the challenge of a particular part, you will be cast.

Department mainstage auditions are posted in the department and on our audition page; we often host pre-audition workshops and recommend attending those, especially if you're new to the department. Being part of our productions is a key part of majoring in Theater, and acting in a show is credited through our 210 course. If you aren't cast in a mainstage show, there are also opportunities in Cabaret 204, independent productions, and end-of-semester class projects.

Musical Theater: I lovelovelove it. Do you offer it?
Yes! This is an area in which we are growing year by year. We offer a course in musical theater that is collaboratively taught with faculty from Theater, Music, and Dance. Every mainstage season includes a musical or a play with strong music and/or movement elements, and students frequently get the chance to put on their own musical theater works under the auspices of the Cabaret 204 season. Music and Dance folks are frequent collaborators on our mainstage productions, and we are actively building creative partnerships with those disciplines as a whole and with individual faculty, staff and students. The recently-announced Stephen Driscoll Musical Theater Endowment will allow us to ramp up this work to an even greater degree.

How can I participate in theater if I am not a major?
Non-majors are welcome to be part of our department in a variety of ways. Many take our introductory performance course, Theater 140, and artists find value in the cross disciplinary challenges offered by our design classes. Many of our classes are open to non-majors, although majors are prioritized in some upper-level courses. Non-majors are invited to audition for our shows; if you’re committed to doing the collaborative work a successful production requires, we’d love to see you try out for a role!

Finally, we offer a Multicultural Theater Certificate, which is open to all majors and offers students an opportunity to look at the theater history, theory, and practice of people of color.

I’m already enrolled at UMass and would like to switch into or add the theater major — what do I need to do?
If you are a UMass student thinking about switching into the major, welcome! We are thrilled to have you! Please make an appointment with the Undergraduate Program Director, Milan Dragicevich to complete the paperwork, discuss your progress toward the degree, and sign up for an advisor.


Planning Your Visit

Where to go
The Department of Theater is located in the Fine Arts Center. We share the Fine Arts Center with the Music and Dance Department, the Art Department, and the Fine Arts Center Concert Hall. (After you get done admiring us, you should check them out, too.)

Where to stay
The Hotel UMass, the official sponsor of accommodations for UMass Theater guest artists, is right on campus which is pretty darn convenient, so we encourage you to check it out.

Tours of campus
We highly recommend visiting UMass Amherst as part of your decision-making process. Visits are best made during the year, on a day when class is in session, so that you can get a true sense of what the campus in general and the Department of Theater, specifically, are like when they’re humming with activity.

Tours of campus are offered Monday through Saturday (but please note, the Department only offers tours Monday-Friday). These tours do not include an in-depth look at the Department of Theater; we recommend contacting us directly (read on for more).

Click here for the campus tour schedule.

Experience the department in action
We're repeating ourselves, aren't we? But it cannot be said enough: we really, really want you to see us in action. Try to do at least one of these three things:

  1. Take a tour: We offer them on weekdays and we prefer to have 3 days’ notice if at all possible. We recommend visiting during the schoolyear. However, if summer is your only time for visiting, please email us with information about when you might be available for a tour and we will try to arrange one.
  2. Ask to sit in on a class or talk to a student who is concentrating in that area — we’d love to give you a chance to experience what your work in the department will be like. Please check the schedule for a class that interests you and contact the faculty member teaching the class. (And again, three days’ notice is great if at all possible.)
  3. We would love to get you complimentary tickets to one of our productions, whether it's a mainstage show, a cabaret piece, or an independent project. We will be happy to arrange tickets (our disclaimer: we do sell out some shows) in advance or once you arrive. We can also often accommodate students who are interested in seeing a dress rehearsal.