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School Matinees and Resources

$5. A fiver. A five-spot. That's how much it will cost your students to attend one of our shows. 

We think students benefit immeasurably from the chance to see live performing arts, and we're especially proud of the two matinees we're offering, with their impactful combination of artistry and social justice subject matter. But we also know that it's important to be sensitive to the financial realities of lower-income students and cash-strapped school systems. Therefore, we're dropping student ticket prices for everyone this year. All students, no matter how big or small your group, get into our student matinees for only $5 a ticket. And all chaperones, no matter how many you bring, get in FREE.

In addition, we continue to offer all our matinee-related resources at no cost. Study guides, pre-show workshops, post-show Q&As, backstage tours — everything is free to student groups.

If you'd like to bring a group, you can contact our PR director for more information about reserving tickets and planning a pre-show workshop.

Our student matinee shows during the 2017-2018 season:

Runaways 
Music, lyrics and book by Elizabeth Swados
Directed by Lou Moreno, Artistic Director of New York City’s INTAR Theatre
School Matinee: Nov. 8 at 10 a.m.
The Rand Theater, UMass Fine Arts Center 

The jittery, desperate energy of youth fuels Runaways, a gut-punch of a musical that deftly blends different musical styles from pop to hip-hop, jazz to reggae. Creator Elizabeth Swados interviewed young addicts, con artists, and victims of sex trafficking —all homeless runaways and orphans— to craft a portrait of what it’s like to be a kid on the edges of society. Their stories — angry, joyful, both childish and grown beyond their years — will stay with you long after the last brilliant note has faded. 

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Infants of the Spring 
Adapted by Ifa Bayeza from the 1932 novel by Wallace Thurman 
Directed by Ifa Bayeza
School Matinee: March 30 at 10 a.m.
The Rand Theater, UMass Fine Arts Center 

Imagine living in a boarding house during the Harlem Renaissance, elbow to elbow with a vibrant collective of African-American thinkers, writers, artists, musicians, and poets. All of that creative energy births brilliant work about race, gender, sex, class, and gentrification — but can it truly effect social change? And how do these artists balance the calling of their creative muses, their need to support themselves, and their belief in social justice? Ifa Bayeza’s vibrant adaptation of Thurman’s satirical roman a clef challenges us to consider the power of art to effect social change today. 

Both shows are recommended for students age 14 and up.