Open Classroom Experience

View an overview of course listings during the week of OCX.

You can filter the OCX classes by date, thread (e.g., large class, clickers, flipped classroom), or by college or school.

After viewing the descriptions of the 2017 OCX courses, click on the Register for Open Classroom Experience button (located at the top and bottom of the web page) to begin the registration process.

Monday, November 06

9:25AM to 10:40AM
PHYSICS 131: Introductory Physics for Life Sciences
Brokk Toggerson
What you will see:

This week’s objective is for students to develop a coherent picture of energy across the disciplines of biology, chemistry, and physics, and at the same time across different distance scales from the microscopic world of atoms to the macroscopic world of people. This course is taught using a flipped-classroom model. Students will have already completed a quiz on the material related to energy on the microscopic scale before coming to class. 

10:10AM to 11:00AM
CHEM 475: Physical Chemistry I: Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy
Scott Auerbach
What you will see:

Quantum chemistry represents one particular synthesis of chemistry, physics, mathematics, and philosophy. Prior to this week of class, students have developed quantum theory up to the "2 body problem" and are attempting to apply their ideas to the hydrogen atom, the foundation of chemistry. Specifically, students will be able to compare different chemical systems, different energy level diagrams, predict the sizes and shapes of atoms via quantum waves, and extend one electron systems to many electron systems.

10:10AM to 11:00AM
COMP-LIT 335: Comic Art in North America
N.C. Christopher Couch
What you will see:

This course weaves art, historical analyses, popular culture, society, and the technology of artistic reproduction. Prior to this week of class, students have discussed the comic strip as an artistic medium and social phenomenon. We are now beginning to think about future media, the comic book, and the graphic novel, and students will start to understand that comics have both social impact and aesthetic value, and to learn about the creative community of comic artists.

10:10AM to 11:00AM
WGSS 187: Gender, Sexuality and Culture
Laura Briggs
What you will see:

This course weaves together history, literature, sociology, feminist science, cultural and media studies, and politics. Prior to this week of class, students have been exploring how interpersonal interactions; relationships; social, educational, and employment experiences; and local and international politics are affected by gender, race, disability, class, nationality. In this class, students will examine the Google memo and its scientific claims about gendered brains, and to evaluate claims about the effect of hostile workplace climate.

12:20PM to 1:10PM
POLISCI 291M: American Politics through Music
Jesse Rhodes
What you will see:

The course is primarily grounded in political science and political theory, but uses popular songs to illustrate and investigate themes in classic readings. In the course, students will learn about democracy in the United States, critically evaluate alternative perspectives on major issues in American politics, draw on multiple perspectives to develop their own informed views, and appreciate how different musical genres contribute to Americans’ understanding of the “American project.”

2:30PM to 3:45PM
SOCIOL 322: Sociology of Education
Melissa Wooten
What you will see:

This class investigates why students have different educational outcomes based on class, race, gender, and sexuality. By the OCX week, students will have focused on how class and race affect educational outcomes and experiences. Students should be able to debate various sociological theories of education, identify the strengths and weaknesses of these theories and apply these theories to education related data for Massachusetts public schools.

2:40PM to 3:55PM
PHYSICS 131: Introductory Physics for Life Sciences
Brokk Toggerson
What you will see:

This week’s objective is for students to develop a coherent picture of energy across the disciplines of biology, chemistry, and physics, and at the same time across different distance scales from the microscopic world of atoms to the macroscopic world of people. This course is taught using a flipped-classroom model. Students will have already completed a quiz on the material related to energy on the microscopic scale before coming to class. 

Tuesday, November 07

8:30AM to 9:45AM
COMM-DIS 301: Speech and Language Development
Gwyneth Rost
What you will see:

This course has its base in two fields: cognitive development and linguistics. Prior to this week’s class, students will have discussed the development of gesture, speech perception and production, learning words, learning morphology, and we will be in the middle of a unit on learning syntax. The course is taught in a "flipped" format, so students watch lectures online and complete problem sets in groups during the class. In class, students will be working in teams on identifying sentence structures and what about those structures makes them easier or harder to acquire.

10:00AM to 11:15AM
BIOLOGY 190H: Quantitative Biology of the Cell
Laura Francis
What you will see:

This course weaves together fundamental principles in molecular and cellular biology with scientific skills such as hypothesis-driven problem-solving, scientific written and oral communication, and working and collaborating in groups. Students have been working all semester in learning content outside of class through Perusall reading assignments, and using class time to either work on problem sets or on case studies associated with the content.

10:00AM to 11:15AM
CLASSICS 250: The Classical Origins of Western Medicine and Medical Terminology
Debbie Felton
What you will see:

This course combines material from different humanities fields (literature, history, linguistics) and aspects of the biological sciences (anatomy, physiology, taxonomy).  Students learn the Greek and Latin roots of scientific and medical terms via a linguistic approach as well as via historical and mythological context. By this point in the semester, students will already have learned several hundred "combining forms," such as those relevant to the cardiovascular, respiratory, and digestive systems and many terms relevant to diagnosing diseases. For class this week, students will become familiar with the combining forms relevant to the optic and hematopoietic/lymphatic systems, including anatomical terminology and some of the basic diseases of these systems (e.g. glaucoma; leukemia) along with the symptoms of those diseases. Students will also become familiar with the Greek myths behind some of the relevant terms. 

10:00AM to 11:15AM
COMM 335: Media & Education
Allison Butler
What you will see:

This course brings in theories from education, pedagogy, media studies, and media analysis. Students begin with contemporary understandings of childhood/adolescence, in order to situate the "student" part of education, before moving into classic theories, philosophies, and moments on education. Throughout it all, we review how the media, particularly film and television, depicts education. At this point in the semester, we are discussing particular topics per class, so each class is unique. In this class, students will develop an understanding of how to make sense of big data on education and educational attainment, as well as how high-stakes testing came to be a part of the majority of students’ school experiences.

10:00AM to 11:15AM
ENGLISH 494MI: Fictions and Fantasies of the Middle Ages
Jenny Adams
What you will see:

This course combines literature, history, popular culture, among many other disciplines. Prior to class this week, students will have used the University Archives to research a building on campus and worked as a team to produce a podcast about it, linking the building itself to a medieval structure. In class, students will be presenting their podcasts of buildings on campus.

10:00AM to 12:00PM
JOURNAL 497J: Social Justice Journalism
Razvan Sibii
What you will see:

This course focuses on the issue of mass incarceration, social justice, community journalism, and the issues, organizations and individuals related to the criminal justice process. Prior to this week’s class, students will have learned about story structure, media representations of incarceration, prison systems, physical and mental health while in prison, and prison reform. In this class, we are examining writing about life after prison.

*NOTE: Because this class runs for two hours, faculty visitors are not expected to stay for the full class, particularly if their schedules cannot accommodate the time period. Visitors should feel free to leave when they need to depart.

11:30AM to 12:45PM
BIOLOGY 580: Developmental Biology
Madelaine Bartlett
What you will see:

This course covers the basics of developmental biology, with a focus on the molecular genetics of development in animals and plants. Prior to this week, students will have learned about fundamental concepts in the field. They will also have been introduced to concepts like stem cells, early development in Drosophila (fruit flies), and the development of limbs and digits. In this class, students will be discussing a scientific paper in teams, and working on a problem set associated with the paper.

11:30AM to 12:45PM
JOURNAL 397DJ: Data-Driven Storytelling
Rodrigo Zamith
What you will see:

This course blends data science with journalism, thereby bridging skills from statistical computing with fact-based storytelling. Prior to OCX, students will have learned how to use R for data analysis using practice data. Additionally, students will have finished, or be finishing, covering ideas pertaining to journalistic storytelling. During the OCX week, we will be practicing how to visualize data, and in particular, how to match form and function. Students should be able to articulate aims for visualizing information, identify different forms of visualizations, and describe pleasant visual aesthetics.

1:00PM to 2:15PM
COMM-DIS 301: Speech and Language Development
Gwyneth Rost
What you will see:

This course has its base in two fields: cognitive development and linguistics. Prior to this week’s class, students will have discussed the development of gesture, speech perception and production, learning words, learning morphology, and we will be in the middle of a unit on learning syntax. The course is taught in a "flipped" format, so students watch lectures online and complete problem sets in groups during the class. In class, students will be working in teams on identifying sentence structures and what about those structures makes them easier or harder to acquire.

4:00PM to 6:30PM
EDUC 497I: Tutoring in Schools
Robert Maloy
What you will see:

This course is a service learning and community engagement course whose goal is to promote improved learning for students, through various tutoring strategies, in K-12 schools and alternative education programs using a flipped course structure in which students do online readings and viewings before coming to the weekly class meeting. This week’s class is called "Whose History/Whose Science," and explores how history and science are traditionally taught in K-12 schools along with ideas and strategies for how to improve the learning of public school students in both disciplines.

Wednesday, November 08

9:25AM to 10:40AM
PHYSICS 131: Introductory Physics for Life Sciences
Brokk Toggerson
What you will see:

This week’s objective is for students to develop a coherent picture of energy across the disciplines of biology, chemistry, and physics, and at the same time across different distance scales from the microscopic world of atoms to the macroscopic world of people. This course is taught using a flipped-classroom model. Students will have already completed a quiz on the material related to energy on the microscopic scale before coming to class. 

10:10AM to 11:00AM
CHEM 475: Physical Chemistry I: Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy
Scott Auerbach
What you will see:

Quantum chemistry represents one particular synthesis of chemistry, physics, mathematics, and philosophy. Prior to this week of class, students have developed quantum theory up to the "2 body problem" and are attempting to apply their ideas to the hydrogen atom, the foundation of chemistry. Specifically, students will be able to compare different chemical systems, different energy level diagrams, predict the sizes and shapes of atoms via quantum waves, and extend one electron systems to many electron systems.

10:10AM to 11:00AM
COMP-LIT 335: Comic Art in North America
N.C. Christopher Couch
What you will see:

This course weaves art, historical analyses, popular culture, society, and the technology of artistic reproduction. Prior to this week of class, students have discussed the comic strip as an artistic medium and social phenomenon. We are now beginning to think about future media, the comic book, and the graphic novel, and students will start to understand that comics have both social impact and aesthetic value, and to learn about the creative community of comic artists.

10:10AM to 11:00AM
WGSS 187: Gender, Sexuality and Culture
Laura Briggs
What you will see:

This course weaves together history, literature, sociology, feminist science, cultural and media studies, and politics. Prior to this week of class, students have been exploring how interpersonal interactions; relationships; social, educational, and employment experiences; and local and international politics are affected by gender, race, disability, class, nationality. In this class, students will think about why Middlebury students tried to "no-platform" Charles Murray; to evaluate the scientific value and history of claims about race and IQ; and to think about how claims of racial difference and IQ affect educational and workplace climate for white folks and people of color.

12:20PM to 1:10PM
POLISCI 291M: American Politics through MusicPOLISCI 291M: American Politics through Music
Jesse Rhodes
What you will see:

The course is primarily grounded in political science and political theory, but uses popular songs to illustrate and investigate themes in classic readings. In the course, students will learn about democracy in the United States, critically evaluate alternative perspectives on major issues in American politics, draw on multiple perspectives to develop their own informed views, and appreciate how different musical genres contribute to Americans’ understanding of the “American project.”

2:30PM to 3:45PM
SOCIOL 322: Sociology of Education
Melissa Wooten
What you will see:

This class investigates why students have different educational outcomes based on class, race, gender, and sexuality. By the OCX week, students will have focused on how class and race affect educational outcomes and experiences. Students should be able to debate various sociological theories of education, identify the strengths and weaknesses of these theories and apply these theories to education related data for Massachusetts public schools.

2:40PM to 3:55PM
PHYSICS 131: Introductory Physics for Life Sciences
Brokk Toggerson
What you will see:

This week’s objective is for students to develop a coherent picture of energy across the disciplines of biology, chemistry, and physics, and at the same time across different distance scales from the microscopic world of atoms to the macroscopic world of people. This course is taught using a flipped-classroom model. Students will have already completed a quiz on the material related to energy on the microscopic scale before coming to class. 

Thursday, November 09

8:30AM to 9:45AM
COMM-DIS 301: Speech and Language Development
Gwyneth Rost
What you will see:

This course has its base in two fields: cognitive development and linguistics. Prior to this week’s class, students will have discussed the development of gesture, speech perception and production, learning words, learning morphology, and we will be in the middle of a unit on learning syntax. The course is taught in a "flipped" format, so students watch lectures online and complete problem sets in groups during the class. In class, students will be analyzing a sample of language from a child to identify structures and processes the child uses.

10:00AM to 11:15AM
BIOLOGY 190H: Quantitative Biology of the Cell
Laura Francis
What you will see:

This course weaves together fundamental principles in molecular and cellular biology with scientific skills such as hypothesis-driven problem-solving, scientific written and oral communication, and working and collaborating in groups. Students have been working all semester in learning content outside of class through Perusall reading assignments, and using class time to either work on problem sets or on case studies associated with the content.

10:00AM to 11:15AM
CLASSICS 250: The Classical Origins of Western Medicine and Medical Terminology
Debbie Felton
What you will see:

This course combines material from different humanities fields (literature, history, linguistics) and aspects of the biological sciences (anatomy, physiology, taxonomy).  Students learn the Greek and Latin roots of scientific and medical terms via a linguistic approach as well as via historical and mythological context. By this point in the semester, students will already have learned several hundred "combining forms," such as those relevant to the cardiovascular, respiratory, and digestive systems and many terms relevant to diagnosing diseases. For class this week, students will become familiar with the combining forms relevant to the optic and hematopoietic/lymphatic systems, including anatomical terminology and some of the basic diseases of these systems (e.g. glaucoma; leukemia) along with the symptoms of those diseases. Students will also become familiar with the Greek myths behind some of the relevant terms. 

10:00AM to 11:15AM
COMM 335: Media & Education
Allison Butler
What you will see:

This course brings in theories from education, pedagogy, media studies, and media analysis. Students begin with contemporary understandings of childhood/adolescence, in order to situate the "student" part of education, before moving into classic theories, philosophies, and moments on education. Throughout it all, we review how the media, particularly film and television, depicts education. At this point in the semester, we are discussing particular topics per class, so each class is unique. In this class, students will apply their pedagogical knowledge as well as their media analysis skills to deconstructing selections from a film titled "How to Eat Fried Worms," which represents a middle school experience.

10:00AM to 11:15AM
KIN 394AI: Applying Concepts of Kinesiology to Real-World Concepts
Eliza Frechette
What you will see:

This course is designed to bridge introductory courses with upper-division classes, and provide opportunities for students to apply their knowledge to real-world situations using research to drive a group project. Students will be discussing one of the interdisciplinary books—Born to Run—during class. Specifically, students will discuss the value of "non-scientific" texts and evidence-based decision making, the connection made with kinesiology and other disciplines, and how reading it has shaped their thinking. 

10:00AM to 11:15AM
OIM 320: Quality Management
Shirley Shmerling
What you will see:

This course examines statistics and data analysis methods to manage and improve the quality of products and services in for-profit and not-for-profit organizations. Students will learn how to leverage data and analytics tools to make managerial decisions about improving quality of products or services. At the conclusion for this particular OCX class, students will understand sampling and determine acceptable intervals for meeting customers' expectations.

11:30AM to 12:45PM
NRC100: Environment and Society
Lena Fletcher
What you will see:

This course incorporates ecology, geology, sociology, civic engagement, contemplative practices, and has a significant focus on developing professional skills. The students will just be starting their third class project, a jaguar conservation proposal in which the students must articulate how a $5 million investment will assist in continued broad-scale jaguar habitat and corridor conservation. The teams will need to justify their proposed prioritized areas for conservation using real datasets and maps provided, their research into jaguar life strategies, and other reasoning, thereby engaging in the practices of wildlife ecologists: using data, knowledge of a species and system to inform their decisions around priorities related to wildlife and environmental conservation.

1:00PM to 2:15PM
ART-HIST 354: Art of Buddhism
Christine Ho
What you will see:

The course considers transcultural perspectives, text-image relationships, and combines religious studies with art historical methods. Prior to the OCX class, students will have already read a Buddhist text/primary source in preparation for discussion.

1:00PM to 2:15PM
COMM-DIS 301: Speech and Language Development
Gwyneth Rost
What you will see:

This course has its base in two fields: cognitive development and linguistics. Prior to this week’s class, students will have discussed the development of gesture, speech perception and production, learning words, learning morphology, and we will be in the middle of a unit on learning syntax. The course is taught in a "flipped" format, so students watch lectures online and complete problem sets in groups during the class. In class, students will be analyzing a sample of language from a child to identify structures and processes the child uses.

1:10PM to 2:15PM
MUSICAPP 116: Saxophone Studio Class
Jonathan Hulting-Cohen
What you will see:

This course weaves contemplative practices in action with musical performance. Prior to this class, students have been developing their skills in playing the saxophone, reflecting, planning, self-motivating, and performing.

2:30PM to 3:45PM
BIOLOGY 582: DNA to Diversity
Craig Albertson
What you will see:

The focus of the course is on the nascent field of evo-devo, which brings together many sub-disciplines of biology including evolutionary morphology, developmental biology, genetics, and genomics. The general goals of the field are two-fold: 1) How does genotype unfold over development to produce phenotype?; and 2) How does natural selection act on the developmental program to produce adaptive variation in form? 

Friday, November 10

10:10AM to 11:00AM
CHEM 475: Physical Chemistry I: Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy
Scott Auerbach
What you will see:

Quantum chemistry represents one particular synthesis of chemistry, physics, mathematics, and philosophy. Prior to this week of class, students have developed quantum theory up to the "2 body problem" and are attempting to apply their ideas to the hydrogen atom, the foundation of chemistry. Specifically, students will be able to compare different chemical systems, different energy level diagrams, predict the sizes and shapes of atoms via quantum waves, and extend one electron systems to many electron systems.