Stephanie Jones

Professional Title: 
Research Assistant Professor
Department: 
Kinesiology
Telephone: 
413-545-4959
Campus Address: 
155 Totman Building
Education: 

B.Sc., University of Guelph; M.S., University of Massachusetts Amherst; Ph.D., McGill University

Area(s) of Specialization: 

Postural Control, Multiple Sclerosis, Low Back Pain, Somatosensory Function

Research Description: 

Current research interests include:

  1. Determinants of balance and gait impairment in individuals with Multiple Sclerosis.
  2. Relationship between somatosensory function and balance impairment in individuals with Multiple Sclerosis.
  3. Rehabilitative strategies to improve sensorimotor coordination in those with neurological or musculoskeletal dysfunction.
Key Publications: 

Van Emmerik, R.E.A., Jones, S.L., Busa, M.A., Baird, J.L. A systems perspective on postural and gait stability: Implications for Physical Activity and Disease. Kinesiology Review. 2013 Feb: 2(1), pp. 17-28.

Jones, S.L., Henry, S.M., Raasch, C.C., Hitt, J.R., Bunn, J.Y. Individuals with non-specific low back pain use a trunk stiffening strategy to maintain upright posture. Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology. 2012 Feb: 22(1), pp. 13-20.

Remelius, J.G., Jones, S.L.¸House, J.D., Busa, M.A., Eve, J., Sugumaran, K., Kent-Braun, J., Van Emmerik, R.E.A. Gait impairments in Persons with Multiple Sclerosis Across Preferred and Fixed walking speeds. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 2012 Sep: 93(9), pp. 1637-42.

Jones, S.L., Henry, S.M., Raasch, C.C., Hitt, J.R., Bunn, J.Y. Individuals with non-specific low back pain in an active episode demonstrate temporally altered torque responses and direction-specific enhanced muscle activity following unexpected balance perturbations. Experimental Brain Research. 2012 Sep: 221(4), pp. 413-26.

Jones, S.L., Henry, S.M., Raasch, C.C., Hitt, J.R., Bunn, J.Y. Responses to multi-directional surface translations result in re-weighting of proximal versus distal strategies to maintain upright posture. Experimental Brain Research. 2008: 187, pp. 407-17.