Lindiwe Sibeko

Assistant Professor, Extension Faculty
204 Chenoweth Laboratory
413-545-1693

lsibeko@nutrition.umass.edu

Education: 

B.Sc., Mount Saint Vincent University; M.Sc., McGill University; PhD, McGill University; Postdoctoral Research Fellow: Transcultural Psychiatry; Dietitian; International Board Certified Lactation Consultant.

Area(s) of Specialization: 

Maternal and Child Health in racial/ethnic minorities and low-income populations (local, national & global settings), Breastfeeding & Lactation/Human Milk, Community-Based research, Prevention of Childhood Obesity

Research Description: 

My research interests are strongly influenced by my professional background in dietetics, lactation care/management and community health programming for at risk women and children, coupled with community-engaged research in the area of breastfeeding and human milk. I use a life-course framework that integrates research, education and extension outreach to improve health outcomes among women and children vulnerable to health disparities. Consequently, my research seeks to identify early risk factors at the individual, community and institutional levels in the population groups I work with; and to develop multilevel interventions that contribute to improved health outcomes, throughout the life course of vulnerable women, infants and children.

Current projects:

BCAC (Breastfeeding Community Action Coalition): Community based participatory research study that aims to identify, design & test interventions to increase breastfeeding initiation and duration rates among African American women, as a core strategy to reduce the infant mortality rate among African American newborns, and improve maternal health outcomes;

FAST (Food, Activity and Screen Time): Longitudinal cohort study that seeks to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of social influence on adolescent weight related behaviors that include diet, physical activity and screen time.

FAVE42 (Fruit and Vegetable Enhancement for Two): Formative study with the overall objective to determine the extent to which a high fruit & vegetable diet can moderate inflammatory signals associated with breast cancer risk, in diverse populations (study).

Key Publications: 

Doughty KN, Reeves KW, Ronnenberg AG, Qian J, Sibeko L.  Barriers to Exclusive  Breastfeeding among Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in the United States. J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2018 May;47(3):301-315. doi: 10.1016/j.jogn.2018.02.005.Epub 2018 Mar 3.

Essa AR, Browne EP, Punska EC, Perkins K, Boudreau E, Wiggins H, Anderton DL, Sibeko L, Sturgeon SR, Arcaro KF. Dietary intervention to increase fruit and vegetable consumption in breastfeeding women: A pilot randomized trial measuring inflammatory markers in breast milk. J Acad Nutr Diet 2018; S2212-2672. doi:10.1016/j.jand.2018.06.015.

Lindiwe Sibeko, Anna Coutsoudis, Sphindile Nzuza, Katherine Gray-Donald. Mothers’ Infant Feeding Experiences: constraints and supports for optimal feeding in an HIV-impacted urban community in South Africa. Public Health Nutrition; 2009;12(11),1983-1990.

Cordeiro LS, Sibeko L, Nelson-Peterman J. Healthful, Cultural Foods and Safety Net Use Among Cambodian and Brazilian Immigrant Communities in Massachusetts. J Immigr Minor Health. 2017 Jun 12. doi: 10.1007/s10903-017-0607-3. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 28608262.

Hsiao B, Sibeko L, Wicks K & Troy, L. Mobile produce market influences access to fruits and Vegetables in an urban environment. Public Health Nutrition. 1-13; epub Jan 2018 doi:10.1017/S1368980017003755

 L Sibeko, MA Dhansay, KE Charlton, T Johns, K Gray-Donald. Beliefs, Attitudes and Practices of Breastfeeding Mothers from a Periurban Community in South Africa. J Human Lactation; 2005; 21(1): 31-38.

L Sibeko, MA Dhansay, KE Charlton, T Johns, ME Van Stuijvenberg, K Gray-Donald. Full-term, peri-urban South African infants under 6 months of age are at risk for early-onset anaemia; Public Health Nutrition; 2004; 7(6):813-820.