Laura N. Vandenberg

Professional Title: 
Assistant Professor
Department: 
Environmental Health Sciences
Telephone: 
413-577-7405
Campus Address: 
149B Goessman
Education: 

B.S., Cornell University, 2003; Ph.D., Tufts University School of Medicine, 2007; Postdoctoral Fellow & Research Associate, The Forsyth Institute Center for Regenerative & Developmental Biology and Harvard University School of Dental Medicine, 2007-2008; Postdoctoral Fellow, Tufts University, Department of Biology and Center for Regenerative & Developmental Biology, 2008-2013

Area(s) of Specialization: 

endocrine disruptors, hazard assessment, developmental biology, endocrinology

Research Description: 

My research explores how early life exposures to chemicals and chemical mixtures can predispose individuals to diseases that manifest later in life. Classical toxicology often focuses on how fetal chemical exposures can produce birth defects, an important part of chemical safety. My work instead addresses how low doses of chemicals during critical windows of development can alter gene expression, cell differentiation, and tissue organization in subtle ways that can lead to adult diseases such as cancer, obesity, and infertility. I am specifically interested in the class of chemicals termed ‘endocrine disruptors’ and have worked extensively with one chemical, bisphenol A (BPA). My work also focuses on how traditional toxicology assays have failed to identify a number of ubiquitous endocrine disruptors, and how current risk assessment practices can be improved in the study and regulation of this class of chemicals.

Key Publications: 

Vandenberg LN, Colborn T, Hayes T, Heindel JJ, Jacobs D, Lee DH, Myers JP, Shioda T, Soto AM, vom Saal FS, Welshons WV, Zoeller RT. 2013. Regulatory decisions on endocrine disrupting chemicals should be based on the principles of endocrinology. Reproductive Toxicology. 38: 1-15.

Vandenberg LN, Colborn T, Hayes T, Heindel JJ, Jacobs D, Lee DH, Shioda T, Soto AM, vom Saal FS, Welshons WV, Zoeller RT, Myers JP. 2012. Hormones and endocrine disrupting chemicals: low dose effects and non-monotonic dose responses. Endocrine Reviews. 33(3): 378-455

Vandenberg LN, Chahoud I, Heindel JJ, Padmanabhan V, Paumgartten F, Schoenfelder G. 2010. Urinary, circulating, and tissue biomonitoring studies indicate widespread exposure to bisphenol A. Environmental Health Perspectives 118: 1055-70.

Vandenberg LN, Maffini MV, Schaeberle CM, Ucci AA, Sonnenschein C, Rubin BS, Soto AM. 2008. Perinatal exposure to the xenoestrogen bisphenol-A induces mammary intraductal hyperplasias in adult CD-1 mice. Reproductive Toxicology 26: 210-9.

Vandenberg LN, Maffini MV, Wadia PR, Sonnenschein C, Rubin BS, Soto AM. 2007. Exposure to environmentally relevant doses of the xenoestrogen bisphenol-A alters development of the fetal mouse mammary gland. Endocrinology 148: 116-27.

Laura N. Vandenberg Curriculum Vitae