Kinesiology

The Department of Kinesiology in the University of Massachusetts School of Public Health and Health Sciences offers an interdisciplinary approach to the study of human movement, investigating the mechanical, neurological, biochemical, physiological, and behavior components of human movement. The Department offers a wide range of academic programs including:

Kinesiology majors use tools from molecular biology, neuroscience, engineering, medicine, and computer science to work on unique problems in a diverse array of settings that include laboratories, hospitals, health and wellness centers, and field environments. They are prominent in the health and fitness industry, in the health care system, and in the growing biotechnology industry, particularly in areas related to cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, and metabolic health.

In the Spotlight

UMass Amherst Associate Professor of Kinesiology Katherine Boyer

Katherine Boyer, Associate Professor of Kinesiology, recently received a National Institutes of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Trailblazer Award to support a collaboration with Sunghoon “Ivan” Lee of the College of Information and Computing Sciences. The pair will develop and validate an integrated mobile health (mHealth) system for assessing the biomechanics of movement associated with knee osteoarthritis symptoms.

A recent pilot study by kinesiologists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst found that pedaling while conducting work tasks improved insulin responses to a test meal. Investigators led by Research Professor Stuart Chipkin found that insulin levels following the meal were lower when sedentary workers used a pedal desk compared to a standard desk. In addition, work skills were not decreased in the pedaling condition.

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The Department of Kinesiology at the University of Massachusetts School of Public Health and Health Sciences offers an interdisciplinary approach to the study of human movement, investigating the mechanical, neurological, biochemical, physiological, and behavior components of human movement.