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Graduate Students

Our graduate students come to UMass from all over the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking world, including the US and Canada. They are an amazingly diverse and energetic cohort that collaborate with our faculty in many of the initiatives that take place in the Spanish and Portuguese program. Our doctoral students typically hold TOships / TAships for most, if not all, of their time in our Ph.D. program, and have the opportunity to grow as effective instructors of languages, literatures, and cultures. They regularly present their work at national and international academic conferences in their fields. We are also proud of their competitiveness as candidates to fellowships and grants from the Graduate School as well as from external funding sources (including the Fulbright Program and the National Science Foundation). Articles stemming from their research in Iberian Studies, Hispanic Linguistics, Latin American and Latino/a Studies, Portuguese and Brazilian studies, Catalan studies, and Translation are accepted for publication in peer-reviewed venues prior to graduation.


Ana D. Alonso Ortiz

aalonso@umass.edu

Ana D. Alonso Ortiz received a B.A. in Anthropology from the Universidad Autónoma ‘Benito Juárez’ de Oaxaca. She is a third-year Ph.D. student in Hispanic Linguistics at the University of Massachusetts. A speaker of Zapotec, and member of a Zapotec community, her work focuses on the linguistic description of the Zapotec language and the bilingual child’s acquisition of Zapotec and Spanish in Oaxaca, Mexico. She also documents the Zapotec language in order to create pedagogical materials. Ana works on language assessment, generally researching ways to evaluate populations with low literacy skills in their native language. As an anthropologist, her research includes the study of the relationship between language and culture across Zapotec borders.


Alexandre Alves Santos

alexandresan@umass.edu

Alexandre Alves Santos received his B.A. in English Language and Linguistics from the Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG) in Brazil. He is currently a Ph.D. student in Hispanic Linguistics at UMass Amherst. Alexandre is interested in second-language acquisition, language processing, and heritage language development. His research focuses on the morphosyntactic acquisition of Portuguese as a heritage language and the correlations between specific language forms and the age of onset. He has presented his work at academic conferences on second-language processing, second-language acquisition, sociolinguistics, and second-language intonation.


Marco T. Bittencourt

mbittencourt@umass.edu

Marco T. Bittencourt has been an instructor of TESOL since 1995. He holds a B.Sc. in Business Administration from the University of Southern California (Los Angeles, CA) and a B.A. in English Language and Literature from the Catholic University of Brasilia (Brasilia, Brazil). He holds a Master’s in Linguistics from the University of Brasilia (Brasilia, Brazil). In September 2017 Marco joined the doctoral program in Hispanic Linguistics at UMass. His major area of research is second-language acquisition of heritage speakers of Portuguese. He also works on sociolinguistics, specifically on variation theory of syntactic phenomena in heritage speakers of Portuguese. He has been an Adjunct Faculty of Portuguese and Instructor of Spanish at Texas A&M International University. He has also worked in English-teaching programs, as a Language Specialist of TESOL, at Texas A&M International University, University of Houston-Downtown, and Lone Star College in Houston.


Virginia Correia

vcorreia@umass.edu

Virginia Correia received a B.A. in Economics from Framingham State University. After working for ten years in the financial industry, she changed career paths into academia. She received her M.A. in Spanish from San Diego State University and in the fall of 2018 entered the Spanish and Portuguese doctoral program at UMass Amherst, where she is studying Golden Age drama. In addition to Spanish, she is also fluent in Portuguese and has translated Portuguese articles into English for the International Yearbook of Futurism Studies (De Gruyter, 2017).


Fiona Dixon

fddixon@spanport.umass.edu

Fiona Dixon is a Ph.D. student in Hispanic sociolinguistics and phonetics. Her dissertation examines language attitudes and phonetic accommodation of Dominican immigrants in Madrid. To date, her work focuses on dialects in contact, synchronic linguistic variation, phonetic accommodation, and diaspora/minority communities. She is currently interested in continuing work with minority communities, exploring the effects of migration on intonation, and linguistic variation within creole continua.


Sandra Galván

sgalvan@umass.edu

Sandra Galván is originally from Barcelona (Spain). She graduated with a B.A. in History from the Universitat de Girona. After obtaining an M.A. in both Cultural Heritage and Education and Culture from the Universitat de Girona, she joined the Spanish and Portuguese doctoral program in 2015. Sandra is interested in Spanish and Catalan Cinema, with an emphasis on gender studies, space studies, and videographic criticism. Sandra is also pursuing a Graduate Certificate in Film Studies.


Eduardo García-Fernández

egarciaferna@umass.edu

Eduardo García-Fernández graduated with a B.A. in Spanish Philology and a second B.A. in English Philology from the Universidad de Oviedo. He joined the Spanish and Portuguese program at UMass in 2013. After obtaining an M.A. in Hispanic Linguistics, Eduardo entered the Ph.D. program in 2015. His main research interests are the phonetics and phonology of Spanish and Asturian, with a focus on prosody and intonational meaning. Eduardo’s dissertation investigates the patterns of association between intonational form and pragmatic meaning in Asturian vocatives.


Karla Giorgio

kgiorgio@umass.edu

Karla Giorgio received an A.A. in Graphic Design from the Institute Toulouse Lautrec of Lima, an A.A. in Commercial Art from STCC, and a B.A. with a double major in Art History and Latin America Studies from Smith College. In 2017 she obtained an M.A. in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures from UMass, where she is currently a doctoral student in Latin American studies with an emphasis on contemporary Peruvian literature, the negotiations of national identity, and the different expressions of portable art. She has published the interview “Rostros del arte Kichwa: Eriberto Gualinga y sus documentales de la selva” in LatinoRebels. In addition to teaching at UMass, Karla has also been an instructor at Western New England University.


Maria Guarino

mguarino@umass.edu

Maria Guarino graduated with a B.A. in Spanish and Spanish Education from Roanoke College. There, she wrote an honors thesis on machismo and its social construction in Sandra Cisneros’s Caramelo. Maria then taught middle- and high-school Spanish for three years, and entered the Ph.D. program in the fall of 2017. She is interested in Latinx literature, disability studies, and feminism, and is currently pursuing graduate certificates in Advanced Feminism and Film Studies. In her time at UMass, Maria has co-organized two Catalan Film Festivals and coordinated publicity for a Latin American Film Festival, presented her research on the integration of social media in the classroom at the ACTFL conference, founded a Lean-in Circle for women and allies within the Spanish and Portuguese program, facilitated a departmental lecture series about masculinity and allyship in the #metoo movement, and is a Core Team Member of the Gynocine Project.


Odalis P. Hidalgo

ohidalgo@spanport.umass.edu

Odalis P. Hidalgo was born in Perú, and has lived in the United States for 19 years. In 2007 she graduated with a B.A. in Spanish and French, and a concentration in translation, from Montclair State University. She then went on to obtain an M.A. in Spanish with a focus on Latin American studies also from Montclair State in 2010. Odalis is currently working on her doctoral dissertation, which examines the work of Peruvian author Manuel González Prada (1844-1918). She is also pursuing a Graduate Certificate in Film Studies, through which she is investigating racial and social inequalities. She is currently teaching Spanish in a private immersion school in Greenfield, MA.


Irina Lifszyc

ilifszyc@umass.edu

Irina Lifszyc is originally from Rosario, Argentina. She graduated with a B.A. in Translation Studies and obtained an M.A. in Spanish from Ohio University. She is interested in Spanish language variation and historical linguistics. She is currently studying different sociolinguistic aspects of Spanish in Argentina.


Wilmar Lopez-Barrios

wlopezbarrio@umass.edu

Wilmar Lopez-Barrios is originally from Bogotá, Colombia. He is currently a Ph.D. student in Hispanic Linguistics. He graduated with a B.A. in Spanish and English from the Universidad Pedagógica Nacional de Colombia and obtained a M.A. in Linguistics from the Instituto Caro y Cuervo (Bogotá). Wilmar specializes in phonetics and phonology. He is currently studying the acquisition of prosody, in relation to language contact, in bilingual speakers. His research is focused on the acquisition of intonation patterns in Palenquero-Spanish bilingual speakers.


Gina Malagold

gmalagold@umass.edu

Gina Malagold is a Ph.D. candidate in the Spanish and Portuguese Program at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, where she is also pursuing a Graduate Certificate in Latin American Studies. She holds a B.A. in Spanish Language, Literature, and Culture (University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, 2011) and an M.A. in Latin American and Caribbean Studies (University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2013.) She has received national and international fellowships and grants, including a Fulbright Scholarship (Argentina, 2012), a Ronald E. McNair Scholarship, U.S. Department State Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship (Italy), and a Brandeis University Research Fellowship. She has lectured on language, literature, and culture studies at the Institute of Olga Cossettini (Argentina), Westfield State University (Massachusetts), University of Granada (Spain), and is currently a Visiting Researcher and Lecturer at Georgetown University (2018-2019.) Her work and research interests revolve around themes of Jews in the diaspora, US-Mexico cross-border networks, translation and interpretation, and racial and ethnic formations. Her dissertation project focuses on the life and work of transnational Mexican-Jewish anthropologist Anita Brenner. 


Claudia Matachana

cmatachanalo@umass.edu

Claudia Matachana is originally from Asturias (Spain). She graduated with a B.A. in Spanish Philology from the Universidad de Oviedo and obtained an M.A. in Teaching Spanish as a Foreign Language also from the Universidad de Oviedo. Claudia came to UMass as an exchange student in the fall of 2018. She is interested in first language acquisition, phonology, and language variation.


Isaac McAlister

imcalister@umass.edu

Isaac McAlister is from Hartford, CT. He graduated with a B.A. in French Language and Culture and Anthropology from Guilford College in 2010 and earned a M.A. in Hispanic Linguistics from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst in 2016. He began a Ph.D. in Hispanic Linguistics in Fall 2016 at UMass Amherst. Isaac’s research interests include language acquisition, multilingualism, first- and second-language semantic/pragmatic and morphosyntactic development, language-based discrimination, and Romance dialectology. Isaac’s ongoing doctoral research focuses on the development of temporal and aspectual knowledge in L2 and heritage Spanish and Portuguese.


Irene Melé-Ballesteros

imelebal@umaass.edu

Irene Melé-Ballesteros received a B.A. in English Philology from the Universitat de Barcelona and an M.A. in International Relations, Security and Development from the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. She joined the Spanish and Portuguese doctoral program in 2010, in which she has also obtained an M.A. in Hispanic literatures and cultures. Irene is interested in contemporary Iberian theatre and cinema, with a focus on feminist film theory, performance studies, and affect theory from a gender perspective. She has given papers at academic conferences on topics including the works of Angélica Liddell and female spectatorship. She has edited a special issue of Ámbitos feministas devoted to “Feminism and Gynocinema,” and has published articles on Elena Jordi’s pioneering pop culture in Barcelona and the relationship between Lluïsa Cunillé’s theater and the Spanish transition to democracy. Irene’s dissertation studies Spanish and Catalan women’s fiction in film and theatre, analyzing how different levels of fictionality translate across genres and navigate intersectionality in a multi-layered-media representation paradigm. 


Isaura de Los Santos Mendoza

idelossantos@umass.edu

Isaura de Los Santos Mendoza is a first-year Ph.D. student at UMass Amherst focusing on literacy and language revitalization. She is a native speaker of Chatino, an indigenous language spoken in Oaxaca, Mexico. She has been documenting and promoting the Chatino languages since 2011. She has taught Chatino reading and writing to children, and has developed pedagogical materials for acquiring literacy in the Chatino language, including children’s books. In her research she compares the two writing systems for this tonal language, evaluating the importance of tonal marking in the literacy process.


Daniela Narváez

mnarvaezburb@umass.edu

Daniela Narváez is originally from Quito, Ecuador. She graduated with a B.A. in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching from the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador (PUCE). Daniela is a member of the interdisciplinary linguistic research project Oralidad Modernidad that since 2009 aims to study indigenous languages in Ecuador. Daniela entered the Ph.D. program in the fall of 2017. She is interested in sociolinguistics, with an emphasis on language contact (especially between Kichwa and Spanish in Ecuador), dialectology, language identity, and language attitudes. Her current research focuses on morphosyntactic and intonational aspects of Andean Ecuadorian Spanish. She also works with minority groups from Cañar, in New Jersey and Northampton, and researches their linguistic diaspora.


Abril Navarro

dnavarro@umass.edu

Abril Navarro grew up in the Yucatán Peninsula in southern Mexico. She obtained a double degree in Linguistics and Spanish as an undergraduate, and a M.A. degree in Linguistics, from UMass Amherst. Her research has focused mostly on theoretical syntax, more specifically on the ergativity of Maya Yucatec. Abril entered the Ph.D. program in Hispanic Linguistics in 2015. She is interested in developing assessment tools for non-native speakers, linguistic attitudes towards speakers of indigenous languages, and language policy issues, including raising awareness against linguistic discrimination, and common misconceptions of heritage language speakers.


Paulina Ochoa Figueroa

pochoafigeur@umass.edu

Paulina Ochoa Figueroa is originally from Michoacán (Mexico). She received a B.A. in Spanish Literature and Culture from Manhattan College. Paulina joined the Spanish and Portuguese Ph.D. program as a graduate student in 2017. She is finishing her doctoral coursework. Her research interests include translation studies, travel writing in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and Latin@x Literature. She has presented papers at academic conferences on travel and translation, and on Pruebas de Nueva York by the Spanish author José Moreno Villa. Paulina intends to pursue a graduate certificate on Translation and Interpreting Studies. She teaches basic- and intermediate-level Spanish, and medical interpreting. She is also a freelance translator and interpreter.


Pilar Osorio

mdosorio@umass.edu

Pilar Osorio obtained a B.A. in Literature from the Pontificia Universidad Javeriana and an M.A. in Latin American Literature and Culture from the Instituto Caro y Cuervo. Before joining UMass, she worked for the Library Network of the Banco de la República in Colombia, where she coordinated literature programs. She also worked as a coordinator of the National Memory Program and the Publishing Promotion Program for the Colombian Ministry of Culture, and as a teacher of literature in high school. Pilar is currently a doctoral candidate in the Spanish and Portuguese program, where she works on the theory of emotions in Latin American women’s narratives. She is also pursuing a Graduate Certificate in Film Studies. Pilar currently serves as chief curator of the Latin American Film Festival at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.


Elisabet Pallàs

epallas@spanport.umass.edu

Elisabet Pallàs is a doctoral candidate in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. She holds a B.A. in Humanities from the Universitat Pompeu Fabra (Barcelona) as well as two master’s degrees in Publishing (from the Universitat de Barcelona, 2013) and Peninsular literatures and cultures (from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, 2015). Interested in visual cultures, her current work focuses on contemporary Iberian theatre and film. Her dissertation, tentatively entitled “Expropriating Affect: Displacement and Reoccupation in Barcelona’s Ciutat Vella District (1975-2010)” delves into the analysis of theater and film documentaries that illustrate the population’s forced displacement from Barcelona’s oldest district, Ciutat Vella. Grounded on a theoretical perspective that combines sociology and city studies, Elisabet’s project reflects on states’ mechanisms to enforce and legitimize territorial, cultural, and corporeal expropriations by deploying tactics that include, among other strategies, the criminalization of poverty and the passing of local laws restricting the use of public spaces.


Christian Puma Ninacuri

cpuma@umass.edu

Christian Puma Ninacuri is originally from Ambato (Ecuador). He graduated with a B.A. in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching from the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador (PUCE). Christian entered the Ph.D. program in the fall of 2017 and is interested in sociolinguistics, with an emphasis on language contact (especially between Kichwa and Spanish in Ecuador), dialectology, and language identity. Christian is also a member of the interdisciplinary linguistic research project Oralidad Modernidad that aims to study indigenous languages in Ecuador.


Aida Roldán

aroldangarci@spanport.umass.edu

Aida Roldán obtained a B.A. in English Philology and an M.A. in Construction and Representation of Cultural Identities from the Universitat de Barcelona, where she focused on ethnic, gender, and cultural studies. Aida entered the Spanish and Portuguese doctoral program in the fall of 2013. She is interested in U.S. Latino literatures and cultures, gender studies, and mass/pop culture. Currently she combines her academic interests and writing with a career in teaching. Aida has worked for a variety of institutions of higher learning, such as Universitat de Barcelona, University of Massachusetts, Universidad de Oviedo, and University of Missouri.


Camila C. Santiago

ccarvalho@umass.edu

Camila C. Santiago completed her B.A. in Portuguese at the Universidade Estadual de Montes Claros (Brazil) in 2009. She is currently an M.A. candidate in Lusophone Literatures and Cultures at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, where she also works as a Teaching Associate in Portuguese. Her master’s thesis studies the representation of religious women in the work of Portuguese author José Saramago from a feminist point of view. In 2017 Camila presented her paper “Female Representations in José Saramago: A Space for Oppositional Discourses from the Canonical Gospels to the Gospel According to Jesus Christ,” which she later elaborated into a book chapter published in the volume Saramago’s Philosophical Heritage (Palgrave-Macmillan, 2018).


Celia Sainz

csainz@umass.edu

Celia Sainz is originally from Madrid (Spain). She received a B.A. in Journalism and Media Studies from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Celia entered the Ph.D. program in Iberian studies in the fall of 2017, and is also pursuing a Graduate Certificate in Film Studies. Her research focuses on film and gender in the Iberian Peninsula. She is currently working on her master’s thesis on the poetic cinema of the Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona. Since 2018 she co-curates the Catalan Film Festival and the Latin American Film Festival at UMass. She has been collaborating in the Gynocine Project since 2017.


Christopher Schafenacker

cschafen@umass.edu

Christopher Schafenacker grew up in Edmonton (Canada). He received a B.A. with distinction in Philosophy and Spanish Language & Literature from the University of Alberta before embarking on extensive travels through Latin America and Europe. In 2012 he began coursework in the Comparative Literature program at UMass Amherst before finding his true home in the Spanish & Portuguese program. After earning his M.A., he progressed to the Ph.D. where he works on literary exchanges between Spain and North America. Specifically, he writes about the translation history of Federico García Lorca’s Poeta en Nueva York (1940) and the impact this work had on successive generations of North American poets.


Carla Suárez Vega

csuarezvega@umass.edu

Carla Suárez Vega holds a B.A. in English Studies from the Universidad de Oviedo, where she also obtained an M.A. in Gender and Diversity and an M.A. in Teaching Spanish as a Foreign Language. She joined the Spanish and Portuguese doctoral program in the fall of 2015. Carla is interested in contemporary Iberian studies, especially on graphic narratives and film, from a the perspective of gender studies and queer theory. She has given papers at academic conferences on historical memory in graphic novels of the Spanish Civil War, transvestism, performance, and counterculture during the Spanish Transición, and queer urban space in Nazario’s Anarcoma and Rodrigo’s Manuel. Her dissertation focuses on queer culture and the production of queer subjectivities within the counterculture movements of the Spanish transition to democracy.


Santiago Vidales

svidales@spanport.umass.edu

Santiago Vidales was born in Bogotá. He holds a B.A. in philosophy and an M.A. in Latin American Studies. His M.A. thesis focused on Latin American (re)interpretations of Shakespeare’s The Tempest and how these processes are anchored in revolutionary politics. Since 2014 Santi has been working towards his Ph.D. in Latin American and Latinx Cultural Studies with an emphasis in Chicano and Vanguard poetry from the twentieth century. His dissertation on Chicano poet and activist Raúl Salinas aims to place Chicano poetry within, and as part of, the literary traditions of Latin America. By placing these traditions in conversation, the project also aims to rethink how bilingual poetry challenges and reinvigorates the Spanish poetic tradition going back to sixteenth-century Imperial Spain. Other intellectual passions of his include Colombian historical novels, novels about dictatorships in the Americas, and Caribbean short stories. He has taught all Spanish language courses in SpanPort as well as content classes and literature classes in Comparative Literature.