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Spanish and Portuguese, Deparment of Languages, Literatures and Cultures

Courses

Upcoming Undergraduate Course Descriptions

For a complete list of undergraduate courses:
SpanPort Undergraduate Courses

Fall 2014 Courses

Spanish 197A - Elementary Catalan I
Instructor TBA

This course is conceived to enable students to acquire the basic notions of the Catalan language through task-based daily communicative situations. The teacher will provide the necessary tools to guarantee an autonomous learning process focused on the student’s individuality. The course’s practical nature will promote both the apprentice’s participation and interaction in order to facilitate communication in different socio-cultural contexts. This course will develop the student’s capacity in order to achieve a progressive mastery of the four main skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking.

Spanish 297C - Intermediate Catalan I
Guillem Molla

This course is conceived to enable students to acquire an intermediate command of the Catalan language through task-based daily communicative situations. The instructor will provide the necessary tools to guarantee an autonomous learning process focused on the student’s individuality. The course’s practical nature will promote both the apprentice’s participation and interaction in order to facilitate communication in different socio-cultural contexts. This course will develop the student’s capacity in order to achieve a progressive mastery of the four main skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking.

Spanish 297D - Intermediate Catalan II
Guillem Molla

Meant to be taken in conjunction with Catalan 297C, this course is meant to be an Intermediate Intensive of the Catalan Language for students who already have a solid understanding of Spanish. Please contact professor for more information.


Portuguese Language Program
Frank Fagundes

Developing communicative abilities in Portuguese and understanding the rich culture of the Portuguese-speaking world are the two primary objectives of the course. Consequently, the program combines content-based language instruction with an interactive task-based approach. This means that the material will be presented to you thematically and that the activities used to reinforce your language development will focus on real-life language situations. You will be expected to actively participate in a variety of interactive small and large-group activities. This course is not based on lectures, but rather on active learner participation in different tasks that require students to use Portuguese in various situations that reflect normal use of different varieties of Portuguese. The class will be conducted in Portuguese in order to provide you with maximum exposure to the language.

Portuguese 110 - Elementary Portuguese I
Portuguese 110 is the first course in a four-course sequence (110, 120, 230, 240) that leads to the fulfillment of the foreign language requirement.

Portuguese 120 - Intermediate Portuguese II
Portuguese 120 is the second ccourse in a four-course sequence (110, 120, 230, 240) that leads to the fulfillment of the foreign language requirement.

Portuguese 230 - Intermediate Portuguese I
Portuguese 240 is the third course in a four-course sequence (110, 120, 230, 240) which leads to the fulfillment of the foreign language requirement.

Portuguese 301 - Conversational Portuguese I
Frank Fagundes

Open to students who have completed Portuguese 240 or equivalent, and to heritage speakers with permission of instructor, this course’s main objective is to have students lose their fear of speaking Portuguese. No textbook is required. Students provide a list of topics, from which the instructor prepares a Temário which serves as the ‘textbook’ for the course. Each student has a chance to present one of his/her topics at least three times during the semester, although all students are expected to participate actively in all discussions in class. Topics range from student experiences on campus, travel abroad, Brazilian soap operas, racism and perhaps even to the legalization of marijuana. All topics are fair game – so long as the students come to class prepared to discuss them. Topics are announced ahead of time so that all students have a chance to prepare for the discussions. The Internet is our main source of topics as well as new vocabulary to go along with them. There are two exams: one midterm and one final on topics of the student’s own choosing.

Portuguese 312 - Advanced Composition
Frank Fagundes

This course is open to students who have completed Portuguese 240 or who are heritage speakers with permission of the instructor. Port 312 is a composition course where students read prose texts, review necessary rules of grammar and syntax, study basic modes of expression (narrative, descriptive, expository, dialogue) and review principles of stylistics, such as euphony/cacophony, and diction. We will also review the rules governing the New Orthography or Spelling of Portuguese. With the objective of enriching vocabulary, students will study prefixes and suffixes derived from Latin and Greek. A total of 12 compositions will be required, roughly one per week: one composition based on personal experiences and the others derived from texts discussed in class. A first correction will be made by the instructor, a second will be made in class with the collaboration of peers.

Portuguese 321 - Introduction to Portuguese Literature II
Frank Fagundes

Open to students who have taken Portuguese 240, its equivalent or permission of the instructor, this course is the second in a two-course series of Introduction to Portuguese Literature. Port 321, which can be taken out of sequence, focuses on a study of representative writers and texts from the 18th thru the 20th century. Literary movements surveyed will include Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism/Naturalism, Symbolism, Modernism(s), and Neo-Realism. The following genres will receive particular attention: poetry, short story, drama, and novella. Each student will read a novel on his/her own and do an oral presentation on that work in class. Necessary elements of literary theory and analysis will be discussed to prepare the students for an in-depth reading of texts, by men and women, covering a period of over two hundred years of Portuguese history.

Portuguese 597PW - Women Writers of Portugal
Jose Ornelas

This course, open to both graduate and undergraduate students, focuses on female voices of contemporary Portugal as they explore through new discursive strategies issues related to gender construction and the ever-changing socio-historical space. The influence of women writers in shaping Portuguese literary canon. Readings by Agustina Bessa Luis, Fernanda Botelho, Lidia Jorge, Olga Goncalves, Teolinda Geraso, Clara Pinto Correia, Maria Velho da Costa, Maria Gabriels Llansol. Requirements: undergraudates, two papers (7-8 pages); graduates, two papers (10-12 pages). Prerequisites: A reading k nowledge of Portuguese or consent of instructor.


Spanish Language Program
Carole Cloutier

The overall goal of these courses is developing proficiency in the four language skills —listening, reading, speaking, and writing—, as well as gaining cultural understanding and emphasizing diversity in the various regions of the Spanish-speaking world, essential to culturally-based interactive language learning. Our first-year program uses an input-to-output and task-based approach that engages students in working cooperatively as they complete a wide range of activities that are interactive in nature. One of the benefits of interactive instruction is that students are required to make active use of Spanish in the classroom as they negotiate meaning in contexts that resemble those they will encounter outside the classroom. Our approach to grammar instruction is to allow students to master essential structures while ensuring that valuable class time is devoted to meaningful, communicative use of the target language. Explanations provided in the textbook allow students to gain important information about the grammar, practice with these forms in the preparation manual, and get immediate feedback on their work. Consequently, the instructor’s in-class explanations of the grammar will be kept to a minimum and will be centered around specific questions and areas that may cause students problems.

Spanish 110 - Elementary Spanish I
This is the first in a four-course sequence of basic Spanish, and is designed or students with limited knowledge of Spanish.

Spanish 120 - Elementary Spanish II
This is the second in a four-course sequence of basic Spanish, is designed for students who have completed SPAN-110.

Spanish 230 - Intermediate Spanish I
This is the third in a four-course sequence of basic Spanish, is designed for students who have completed SPAN-120 (or the equivalent).

Spanish 240 - Intermediate II
This is the last in a four-course sequence of basic Spanish, is designed for students who have completed SPAN-230 (or the equivalent).

Spanish 246 - Intermediate Intensive Spanish
Instructor TBA

Intensive course covering contents of Spanish 230 and 240 in one semester. Greater focus in this course on development of reading and writing skills within area of academic/literary discourse. Not recommended for slow language learners. Prerequisite: SPANISH 120 or 126.

Spanish 285 - Thatcher Spanish Program
Jayne Reino

This two-credit conversational seminar explores the diverse cultures and societies of the Spanish-speaking world. Rather than focusing on language instruction itself (participants must have conversational fluency) the goal of the course is to increase social and cultural awareness and develop critical perspective through class discussions. The course accompanies the Thatcher Residential Academic Program (RAP) experience. Participants live in Thatcher Residence Hall with students engaged in one of our six living-learning language communities. The emphasis of the program is on building our Spanish language community; students can expect to gain confidence and comfort with social interactions in Spanish. Native speakers, heritage speakers, and students who plan to study-abroad, or who are returning from study-abroad programs are encouraged to apply. Honors Colloquium (SPANISH H285-01) available for an additional credit. Enrollment in the course requires prior acceptance to the program. Applications can be downloaded here.

Spanish 311 - Advanced Grammar
Patricia Gubitosi

Spanish 311 is an advanced course in Spanish grammar and writing for students minoring or majoring in Spanish. Spanish 311 is designed to give the student a thorough review of some of the major grammatical properties of the Spanish language. This course is designed to help students develop their writing proficiency, while providing them with tools to think critically about how to write in Spanish.

Spanish 312 - Oral and Written Expression
Ameal-Pérez

This course introduces basic techniques and stylistics to enable students to communicate (both oral and written) in Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 311.

Spanish 313 - Spanish Composition II/Junior Year Writing
Luis Marentes

This course introduces the elements of effective college-level composition, in Spanish and in English. Prerequisite: Spanish 311.

Spanish 320 - Literary Currents in Spain I
Instructor TBA

Introduction to the literature of Spain from the Middle Ages to 1700. Emphasis on literary currents and their relation to history and culture of the period. Representative poetry, narrative, drama. Prerequisite: Spanish 311 or consent of instructor. Taught in Spanish (Gen.Ed. AL).

Spanish 321 - Literary Currents in Spain II
Instructor TBA

Introduction to Spanish literature from 1700 to the present; emphasis on literary currents and their relation to culture and history of the period. Representative drama, poetry, and narrative. Prerequisite: Spanish 311 or consent of instructor. Taught in Spanish (Gen.Ed. AL).

Spanish 322 - Introduction to Spanish American Literature
Emma Rivera-Rábago

Introduction to the literature of Spanish America from the beginnings to the end of the Romantic period. Emphasis on literary currents and their relation to history and culture of the period. Representative poetry, narrative, drama. The class is taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 311 or consent of instructor.

Spanish 323 - Spanish American Literature II
Emma Rivera-Rábago

Introduction to the literature of Spanish America from the end of the Romantic period to the present. Emphasis on literary currents and their relation to history and culture of the period. Representative poetry, narrative, drama. The class is taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 311 or consent of instructor.

Spanish 354 - Spanish for Native Speakers I
Gloria Bernabe-Ramos

This course reviews Spanish grammar with an emphasis on the particular necessities of native Spanish speakers who have not studied the language extensively in an academic setting.  Particular attention is given to writing and reading.  Open only to native speakers of Spanish

Spanish 378 - Spanish Phonetics
Meghan Armstrong

This course introduces students to the phonetics and phonology of the Spanish language, focusing on how these differ from English. By better understanding the two sound systems, and through extensive practice, one goal of this course is for students to improve their pronunciation of Spanish. The phonological component of the course involves learning basic theoretical concepts of Spanish phonology, as well as developing the ability to successfully produce broad transcriptions of spoken Spanish. From a phonetic perspective, students will familiarize themselves with the Praat program for phonetic analysis using this as a tool 1.) to better stand the physical reality of Spanish sounds and 2.) to improve pronunciation. Finally, we will also explore dialectal variation in the Spanish-speaking world.

Spanish 390OW - Trips to the Other World
Albert Lloret

Peoples from all times have believed in an existence beyond death and have been representing the other world in literature and the arts. In this course students will read and interpret a selection of literature about travelers who crossed the border into the other world. The choice of texts will pay special attention to works originally written in Spanish during the Middle Ages and the Early Modern period, while we will see how otherworldly geography and demographics have been changing since ancient times.

Spanish 394PI - Spanish Speaking World
Luis Marentes

This is the first of a three part sequence that should help you reflect upon the way in which your education as Spanish and Portuguese majors relates to your life experiences and aspirations. The sequence’s second part will require you to either study abroad or engage in service learning or an internship in a Spanish or Portuguese- speaking context. The sequence’s third part will give you an opportunity to reflect upon the way in which your overall education prepares you to life after the University. Throughout this semester we will explore your personal and education experiences and examine opportunities in study abroad, service learning and internships, considering how these programs fit in with your other studies. By the time you finish this course you should be able to think critically about these and to make an informed decision about the type of program you would like to join as part of your Integrative Experience.

Spanish 397PP - Spanish Cinema
José Ornelas

Description TBA

Spanish 397R - Spanish in the US: Service Learning
Meghan Armstrong

In this course we will explore Spanish in the U.S. from a range of perspectives. We will apply what is known about the socio-linguistic situations of Spanish-speaking communities throughout the U.S. as we strive to learn about the Spanish-speaking community in Holyoke, Mass (a Spanish-speaking community that has not been described by linguists). The course includes a service-learning component such that students will work as tutors with Spanish-English bilinguals in Holyoke. We will examine the rise of Spanish-speaking communities across the US and will ask crucial questions such as: In what ways can varieties of US Spanish be deemed unacceptable? What Spanish varieties in Spain and Latin America, if any, can be considered linguistically pure or unmixed? What are the implications and repercussions of disallowing heritage languages in elementary schools? In what ways can bilingualism be an advantage or disadvantage? How does the bilingual situation in Holyoke compare to other bilingual situations in the U.S.? Throughout the course students will work together to create tutoring guidelines and best practices that can be made available to future tutors in the area.
All readings in this course are in ENGLISH and there is no Spanish language requirement for this course. Any of the following courses are recommended prior to taking this course, but not required: LING201, LING402, SPAN378 or SPAN470. All students will be required to attend the Five Colleges Holyoke Bound program.

Spanish 415 - Culture & Civilization of Spain
Barbara Zecchi

In this class we will examine the historical, political, social and cultural development of Spain from the Second Republic to the present. Through the study of several films we will tackle topics such as the role of women, censorship, immigration and terrorism, among others. The course is taught in Spanish.

Spanish 470 - General View of Hispanic Linguistics
Luiz Amaral

This course is an introduction to the principles and methods of linguistics, with a focus on Historical Linguistics and Syntax as they apply to Spanish. At the end of the course, not only will students be able to use the fundamental terminology and concepts of the main subfields of Spanish linguistics surveyed in this course, but they will also demonstrate the ability to analyze linguistic data. SPAN-470 seeks to prepare students for other courses in linguistics within the Spanish section of the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures. NOTE: SPAN-470 assumes a thorough understanding of phonological theory, materials that were covered in SPAN-378 (pre-requisite), which is essential in order to be successful in this course.

Spanish 494RI - Reflection Experience Abroad
Luis Marentes

The purpose of this course is to help students reconsider their experience abroad, in an internship or in community service learning, understanding this experience to include their preparation, travel, return and future possibilities. We will consider the relationship between these experiences and students daily lives, academic preparation and future professional plans. This course will be run as a seminar in which student participation is crucial. Students are expected to approach the readings and class discussions from a critical, yet self-reflexive perspective. By the end of the semester students will write two blog posts reflecting upon their major, their general education, their service, and/or study abroad, and the way this has prepared them to move on into the professional world. Students will also make a public presentation reflecting upon their experiences as Spanish and Portuguese majors.

Spanish 497SX - Spanish Syntax
Carole Cloutier

This course provides students with a preamble to the formal analysis of syntactic theory as applied to Spanish sentence structure. Syntactic Structure of Spanish presents a broad view of syntactic theory while exploring phenomena that are specific to the Spanish language, such as: null subject pronouns, clitic doubling, personal ?a?, postverbal subjects, preverbal adverbs, and seven different uses of the particle ?se?.

Spanish 597J - Foreign Language Teaching Methods
Carole Cloutier

The purpose of this course is to review current language acquisition theories, examine various recent trends that have influenced teaching practice, including task-based approaches, and extract from these resources those elements that seem most relevant to the construction of future models for language teaching.

Spanish 597CS - 20th Century Spanish Novel
Diogenes Costa Curras (Visiting Professor)

This seminar focuses on realist narratives in 20th century Spanish literature. A central question concerns how Spanish writers reacted to and commented upon political and social transformations and upheavals in their works throughout the 20th century. Furthermore, this course will examine to which extent the writers at hand, break with, transform or continue previous conceptualizations and manifestations of literary realism. Course materials include novels by Carmen Laforet, Miguel Delibes, Suso de Toro, and Belén Gorpegui and short stories by Méndez Ferrín, and Carmen Martín Gaite. While the main focus will be on literature, films by Icíar Bollaín and Guillermo del Toro will be considered as well. Our discussions throughout the semester will be guided by the following questions: How is reality represented differently across mediums at different historical moments? How do realist representations explore, reflect on and challenge Spanish—political and social—reality at the time? What is the significance of realism with regard to Spanish nationalism? In addition to the primary sources, course materials include theoretical key texts on conceptualizations of realism (Bertolt Brecht, Georg Lukács, André Bazin), nationalism (Benedict Anderson, Homi Bhabha), and history (Hayden White, Michel de Certeau). Discussion conducted in English/Spanish..

Spanish 597W - Latino/a Literature
Roberto Márquez (Visiting Professor)

The Hispanic Caribbean and its Diasporas will examin the emergence and articulation of a distinctly Latin@ consciousness in the United States and the literary expression in which , over time, it finds creative expression. Emphasis will be on the historical, communal, and Diaspora contexts of that expression, as well as its literary particularities, characteristic forms, settings, moods and signature concerns.


Spring 2015 Courses (Schedule Tentative)

Spanish 197C - Elementary Catalan II
Staff

This course is conceived to enable students to acquire the basic notions of the Catalan language through task-based daily communicative situations. The teacher will provide the necessary tools to guarantee an autonomous learning process focused on the student’s individuality. The course’s practical nature will promote both the apprentice’s participation and interaction in order to facilitate communication in different socio-cultural contexts. This course will develop the student’s capacity in order to achieve a progressive mastery of the four main skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking.

Spanish 397J - Introduction to Catalan Literature and Culture
Molla

This course is an overview of the Catalan Culture with a a focus on six central aspects: literature, cinema, art, music, gastronomy and traditions. Through this course you will be able to discover a rich, unique and very interesting culture that includes important characters such as: Mercè Rodoreda, Quim Monzó, Salvador Dalí, Picasso, Isabel Coixet, Cesc Gay... This course will be a good chance not only to enjoy some excellent novels, films and other works, but also to widen our perception and knowledge on Peninsular cultures.

Spanish 497 - Advanced Intermediate Catalan
Molla

Description

Spanish 597T - Catalan Cinema
Barbara Zechi & Guillem Molla

Spanish cinema started in Catalunya with two important schools: the realistic school led by Fructuós Gelabert; and the fantastic trend represented by Segundo de Chomán. After the silence forced upon Catalan cinema during Franco's dictatorship in the 40's and 50's, it started to regain an important role in the film industry with the Barcelona School in the mid 60's. Presently Catalan Cinema enjoys a strong recognition thanks to the works of well-known Catalan directors such as Bigas Luna, Ventura Pons and Isabel Coixet, among others. This class meets once a week for three hours and students are in charge of twenty minutes film introductions as well as discussion moderation; attendance is mandatory. Films are shown in the original language (Catalan or Castilian) w/ English subtitles.

Portuguese Language Program
Frank Fagundes

Developing communicative abilities in Portuguese and understanding the rich culture of the Portuguese-speaking world are the two primary objectives of the course. Consequently, the program combines content-based language instruction with an interactive task-based approach. This means that the material will be presented to you thematically and that the activities used to reinforce your language development will focus on real-life language situations. You will be expected to actively participate in a variety of interactive small and large-group activities. This course is not based on lectures, but rather on active learner participation in different tasks that require students to use Portuguese in various situations that reflect normal use of different varieties of Portuguese. The class will be conducted in Portuguese in order to provide you with maximum exposure to the language.

Portuguese 110 - Elementary Portuguese I
Portuguese 110 is the first course in a four-course sequence (110, 120, 230, 240) that leads to the fulfillment of the foreign language requirement.

Portuguese 120 - Intermediate Portuguese II
Portuguese 120 is the second ccourse in a four-course sequence (110, 120, 230, 240) that leads to the fulfillment of the foreign language requirement.

Portuguese 240 - Intermediate Portuguese II
Portuguese 240 is the fourth course in a four-course sequence (110, 120, 230, 240) which leads to the fulfillment of the foreign language requirement.

Portuguese 301 - Conversation
Staff

Open to students who have completed Portuguese 240 or equivalent, and to heritage speakers with permission of instructor, this course’s main objective is to have students lose their fear of speaking Portuguese. No textbook is required. Students provide a list of topics, from which the instructor prepares a Temário which serves as the ‘textbook’ for the course. Each student has a chance to present one of his/her topics at least three times during the semester, although all students are expected to participate actively in all discussions in class. Topics range from student experiences on campus, travel abroad, Brazilian soap operas, racism and perhaps even to the legalization of marijuana. All topics are fair game – so long as the students come to class prepared to discuss them. Topics are announced ahead of time so that all students have a chance to prepare for the discussions. The Internet is our main source of topics as well as new vocabulary to go along with them. There are two exams: one midterm and one final on topics of the student’s own choosing.

Portuguese 322 - Introduction to Portuguese Literature II
Frank Fagundes

Description

Portuguese 408 - Brazil in Film and Fiction
Daphne Patai

The principal aim of this course is to introduce students to Brazilian culture through selected films and readings (fiction and scholarly articles). By focusing on how filmmakers and writers represent key aspects of Brazilian society past and present, the following major themes will be explored: the colonization process; culture contact between Europeans and native Brazilians; slavery and the resistance to it; economic and political development; immigration and internal migration; life in the backlands; the dictatorship and its aftermath; urban problems. A second aim of the course is to study the development of Brazilian cinema through the past sixty years, especially the movement known as cinema novo. A third aim is to develop analytical skills and writing abilities.

Portuguese 496A - Intensive Portuguese for Native Speakers of Spanish
José Ornelas

Intensive course covering contents of Portuguese 110 to 240 in one semester. Greater focus in this course on development of reading and writing skills within area of academic/literary discourse. Prerequisite: Intermediate level of Spanish proficiency.

Portuguese 597 - Portuguese and Brazilian Modernism
Frank Fagundes

Description

Spanish Language Program
Carole Cloutier

The overall goal of these courses is developing proficiency in the four language skills —listening, reading, speaking, and writing—, as well as gaining cultural understanding and emphasizing diversity in the various regions of the Spanish-speaking world, essential to culturally-based interactive language learning. Our first-year program uses an input-to-output and task-based approach that engages students in working cooperatively as they complete a wide range of activities that are interactive in nature. One of the benefits of interactive instruction is that students are required to make active use of Spanish in the classroom as they negotiate meaning in contexts that resemble those they will encounter outside the classroom. Our approach to grammar instruction is to allow students to master essential structures while ensuring that valuable class time is devoted to meaningful, communicative use of the target language. Explanations provided in the textbook allow students to gain important information about the grammar, practice with these forms in the preparation manual, and get immediate feedback on their work. Consequently, the instructor’s in-class explanations of the grammar will be kept to a minimum and will be centered around specific questions and areas that may cause students problems.

Spanish 110 - Elementary Spanish I
This is the first in a four-course sequence of basic Spanish, and is designed or students with limited knowledge of Spanish.

Spanish 120 - Elementary Spanish II
This is the second in a four-course sequence of basic Spanish, is designed for students who have completed SPAN-110.

Spanish 230 - Intermediate Spanish I
This is the third in a four-course sequence of basic Spanish, is designed for students who have completed SPAN-120 (or the equivalent).

Spanish 240 - Intermediate II
This is the last in a four-course sequence of basic Spanish, is designed for students who have completed SPAN-230 (or the equivalent).

Spanish 311 - Advanced Grammar
Patricia Gubitosi

Spanish 311 is an advanced course in Spanish grammar and writing for students minoring or majoring in Spanish. Spanish 311 is designed to give the student a thorough review of some of the major grammatical properties of the Spanish language. This course is designed to help students develop their writing proficiency, while providing them with tools to think critically about how to write in Spanish.

Spanish 312 - Oral and Written Communication
Ameal-Pérez

This course introduces basic techniques and stylistics to enable students to write in Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 311.

Spanish 320 - Literary Currents in Spain I
Albert Lloret

Introduction to the literature of Spain from the Middle Ages to 1700. Emphasis on literary currents and their relation to history and culture of the period. Representative poetry, narrative, drama. Prerequisite: Spanish 311 or consent of instructor. Taught in Spanish (Gen.Ed. AL).

Spanish 321 - Literary Currents in Spain II
Staff

Introduction to Spanish literature from 1700 to the present; emphasis on literary currents and their relation to culture and history of the period. Representative drama, poetry, and narrative. Prerequisite: Spanish 311 or consent of instructor. Taught in Spanish (Gen.Ed. AL).

Spanish 322 - Spanish American Literature I
Rivera Rábago

Introduction to the literature of Spanish America from the beginnings to the end of the Romantic period. Emphasis on literary currents and their relation to history and culture of the period. Representative poetry, narrative, drama. The class is taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 311 or consent of instructor.

Spanish 323 - Spanish American Literature II
River Rábago

Introduction to the literature of Spanish America from the end of the Romantic period to the present. Emphasis on literary currents and their relation to history and culture of the period. Representative poetry, narrative, drama. The class is taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 311 or consent of instructor.

Spanish 378 - Spanish Phonetics
Armstrong

Spanish 378 is designed to provide students with a linguistic perspective of the sound system of Spanish, as well as basic phonological concepts such as phonemes and allophones. The main goals of the course are to improve students’ pronunciation and prepare them to become future teachers. We also explore the basic differences in the pronunciation of Spanish dialects from different regions of the Spanish-speaking world.

Spanish 397W - Latin American Cinema
Ornelas

The course is designed to introduce students to the cinematic productions of some of the most important Latin American directors from the sixties to the present. We will focus mainly on how these directors have portrayed Latin America. What can we learn from these directors’ depictions of Latin American reality and society? Through their films, we will critically analyze historical, political, social and cultural developments that have shaped Latin America and are fundamental to its understanding. Some of the topics that we will examine during the course of the semester are: racial, social, and gender construction; nation formation; national identity; revolution; emigration/immigration; repression; utopia; resistance; political violence; slavery and freedom; homosexuality; exile; machismo; political and social inquiry; urban violence, etc. Students will be expected to develop analytic filmic skills through an exploration of the connections between the technical composition of the films and the social, political, and cultural context underlying the film narrative.

Spanish 417 - Culture and Civilization of Latin America
Marentes

The historical development of Spanish American culture and civilization through its different manifestations. Historical periods and topics covered depend on the instructor and/or semester. Prerequisite: Spanish 320 or 321 or 322 or 323, or consent of instructor. This course is taught in Spanish. (Gen.Ed. AL, G)

Spanish 470 - General View of Hispanic Linguistics
Cloutier

This course is an introduction to basic aspects of Hispanic linguistics, where Students learn about the different components of language. The course starts with the introduction of concepts that help students understand the nature of language, such as prescriptive and descriptive grammar, grammaticality judgments, linguistic prejudice, and the nature and goals of linguistic inquiry. Six different areas of Hispanic linguistics are presented in the course: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, history of the Spanish language, and sociolinguistics. The general goal of the course is to present a broad view of the nature of human language using Spanish as an example.

Spanish 497 - Phonological Evolution from Latin to Spanish
Cloutier

Description

Spanish 497 - Las caribeñas:invención y subersión
Russotto

Description

Spanish 558 - The Spanish American Essay
Marentes

This class studies the different manifestation of the Spanish American essay, paying particular attention to the way this genre has been used to imagine an American identity.

Spanish 597 - Creative Writing
Russotto

Description