University of Massachusetts Amherst

Department of Sociology

 

 

 

Joohee Han

joohee@soc.umass.edu

Bio

JooHee Han's research interests are social inequality, life course, cumulative advantage and disadvantage, occupation and career, immigration, and labor market policy. Especially he is focusing on the process of reinforcement of social inequality over one’s life course across various social groups such as gender, ethnic or migrant groups etc.

Education

2007 M.A. Sociology Yonsei University
2002 B.A. Sociology Yonsei University

Research

M.A. thesis
"Social Career Trajectory of Highly Skilled Migrants: Professionals in Korean Finance Service Industry"

In his M.A. thesis, applying a longitudinal concept to migrants' career-migration history, he classified migration and career trajectories of highly-skilled migrants, professionals in the Korean finance market, into four types based on geographic mobility patterns and migration motives. From the classifications, he discovered that the universality of knowledge the highly skilled migrants possess influences their migration-career paths. Migrants with universal knowledge applicable to the global finance market have the "Global Cities" migration-career tracks whereas those with localized knowledge specific to the Korean finance market have Asia-Pacific migration-career tracks. The findings led him further to think about the effect of prior life sequences on one's posterior career tracks.

"Factors on Skill Transferability of Immigrants: Job Continuity of U.S. Employment-Based Immigrants." Presented at the 2007 Annual Meeting of ASA, Section on Sociology of Population / Societal Implications of International Migration.

"State and Immigration Policy: A Study on Immigration Laws of U.S." with Seong-soo Choi, Journal of American Studies (Korea). Vol.38 No.2, pp.203-233, Oct. 2006.

"Experiences as Transnational Identity Formation Processes: Denizens' Migration Experiences and Transnational Identity Formation." Yonsei Book of Academic Articles (Korea), Vol. 43, pp. 102-121, Feb. 2006.

Teaching

 

 

Department of Sociology • Thompson Hall • University of Massachusetts–Amherst, MA 01003

http://www.umass.edu/sociol/