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Sephardi Mizrahi Studies Caucus Discussion List - October 8, 2006

Association for Jewish Studies Sephardi/Mizrahi Studies Caucus Discussion List

Editor/Moderator: Aviva Ben-Ur <aben-ur(at)judnea.umass.edu>

Week of Sunday, October 8, 2006 (16 Tishrei 5767)

NOTE: IN ORDER TO LIMIT SPAM SENT TO DICUSSION LIST CONTRIBUTORS, EMAIL ADDRESSES WILL NO LONGER INCLUDE THE @ SYMBOL. TO REPLY TO A CONTRIBUTOR, SIMPLEY REPLACE (at) WITH THE @ SYMBOL. FOR EXAMPLE, hsmith(at)sephardi.com SHOULD BE RENDERED: hsmith@sephardi

For archived issues please visit: http://www.umass.edu/sephardimizrahi/past_issues/index.html

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Index:

1. AJS Abstract: Ludwig Philippson as a modern Jewish intercessor and the case of Iberian-Sephardic history (Schapkow)

2. AJS Abstract: “The New Life ‘a la franca’—Some Remarks about the Ladino Novel of the Early 20th Century” (Cimeli)

3. AJS Abstract: "The Imagined Metamorphosis of the North African Jew" (Picard)

4. New Publication: _Fronteras e Interculturalidad Entre Los Sefardies Occidentales_ (Stern)

5.New in Paperback: _The Yiddish and Ladino Press in the Russian and Ottoman Empires_ (Stein)

6. Job Opportunities: Chair in Jewish Studies & Hebrew Language Instructor at Indiana University (Deckard)

7. Long-term Post-Doctoral Fellowships at the Library Company of Philadelphia for 2007-2008 (The Library Company)

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1. AJS Abstract: Ludwig Philippson as a modern Jewish intercessor and the case of Iberian-Sephardic history (Schapkow)

[Note from Editor/Moderator Aviva Ben-Ur: The Discussion List continues to accept abstracts on Sephardi/Mizrahi papers/panels slated for this December’s AJS]

From: cschapkow(at)ou.edu

Date: Tue, 03 Oct 2006

“Ludwig Philippson as a modern Jewish intercessor and the case of

Iberian-Sephardic History”

Carsten Schapkow, University of Oklahoma


During the course of the nineteenth-century German-speaking Jews turned to Iberian-Sephardic culture as a model for integration into a non-Jewish majority society.  Starting with the Science of Judaism the perception of Jewish participation in Spanish culture as equal partners during the Middle Ages became the most salient and distinctive feature in the elaboration of this “golden” past. 

By the mid-nineteenth century, topics on Iberian-Sephardic history had begun to attract a much wider audience.  Explorations were no longer confined to periodicals and monographs intended for a small educated Jewish reading public related to the Science of Judaism.  In particular the Jewish press played an important role in distributing wider knowledge on Iberian-Sephardic culture.  Most significant for that purpose was the General Journal of Judaism (Allgemeine Zeitung des Judentums) edited by Ludwig Philippson (1811-1889).  One goal of the Journal was to create a living awareness of contemporary Jewish history when dealing with popular topics for a broad audience. Besides, it was the main objective to comment on the emancipation of the Jews in different countries.

I shall focus on Ludwig Philippson’s initiative concerning the resettlement of the Jews to Spain in 1854 and 1855.  Furthermore, I will discuss the reaction in the German-Jewish press towards it.  Philippson saw the Sephardic Jews as the oldest nation on Spanish soil whom had been granted citizenship by the Romans; and under Christians monarchs they were tolerated which was for Philippson the basis argument for the integration in the state.  This understanding enabled him to plead the liberal Spanish government for the introduction of religious freedom and the abolition of the expulsion edict from 1492.  His intervention shows Philippson as a modern intercessor of German Jewry which was still far away from becoming emancipated in the German-speaking lands.  However, Philippson’s self-consciousness as a German Jews made it possible for him to ask Spain for the resettlement of the Jews – not only for those Jews who had been expelled in 1492. 

Dr. Carsten Schapkow

Assistant Professor of Modern JewishHistory

Department of History/ Judaic Studies Program

University of Oklahoma

455 W. Lindsey, DAHT 403A

Norman, Oklahoma 73019-2004

Phone: (405) 325-6356/6508 FAX: (405) 325-6521

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2. AJS Abstract: “The New Life ‘a la franca’—Some Remarks about the Ladino Novel of the Early 20th Century” (Cimeli)

Date: Tue, 3 Oct 2006 15:02:04 +0200

From: Manuela.Cimeli(at)unibas.ch

Panel on Ladino litterature

Manuela Cimeli, University of Basel (Switzerland)

The New Life "a la franca" – Some Remarks about the Ladino Novel of the Early 20th Century

During the first decades of the 20th century, the European influence became omnipresent in the Ladino literature. The intellectual Sephardi class having been educated in the schools of the foreign European states, represented the modern generation. They spoke French and their behaviour reflected entirely the Western culture. Many of them were involved with journalism and thus were responsable for the distribution of the Ladino novels which were firstly published in the press.

The novel established a direct connection to the modern European world. The texts reflect the sociological aspect of modernization and explain the significance of this concept for the Sephardi Jews of the early 20th century. It meant not only external distinguishing marks like the french jacket or the use of the 'otomobil' - the changes were much more profound and influenced the entire social structure by raising topics like the role of women, mixed marriages or the problematic dilemmas connected with assimilation or integration in a non-Jewish environment.

Using some original texts from the second decade of the 20th century, I would like to illustrate some characteristical examples of the trivial, entertaining and yet 'modern' Sephardi novel.

Manuela Cimeli

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3. AJS Abstract: "The Imagined Metamorphosis of the North African Jew" (Picard)

Date: Wed, 4 Oct 2006 13:06:47 -0400

From: Avi Picard <picard(at)bgu.ac.il>

"The Imagined Metamorphosis of the North African Jew;" part of session 10.6, “Cultural Clashes and Israeli Social Policy.”

One of the goals of the Zionist movement in the fifties was to transform the commonly held image of the North African Jewish peddler into an image of a proud, independent, Israeli farmer.

In classical Zionist thought, the Jew of the Diaspora suffered from negative stereotypes.  One contributing factor was his way of earning his living.  As a peddler, he resorted to the use of flattery and pleading.  In addition, despite the special place given to the imaginary vision of the Orient, the Zionist had a different view of Oriental people as a part of Europe’s colonial heritage.

In this context, the images of the North African peddler suffered from a double inferiority. They were Diaspora Jews (merchants, dependents, groveling) and they were Oriental Jews.

During the fifties, when “Aliya” from North Africa was beginning, emissaries and fundraisers saw in these Jews potential candidates for transformation.  They would become farmers living on nationally-owned land and working as a part of a collective – the ultimate Zionist model.

The emissaries describe the present situation of the North African peasant and add that they believe that those Jews can become modern Israeli agriculturists. This attitude was prevalent in many movies produced by the Jewish Agency in the fifties.  (One of those movies will be screened during the lecture, if possible). Those movies were designed for raising money for the absorption of North African Jews into Israeli villages (Moshavim).  They presented images that integrated the present with the future, reality with expectation, actual situation with desired outcome.

Dr. Avi Picard

University of Maryland

Email: picard(at)umd.edu; picard(at)bgu.ac.il

Home address: 1116 Bromley Ave., Teaneck, NJ 07666

Phone number: 1-201-836-1860; Cell: 1-201-893-8674; office: 301-405-1062

[ed.: very slight edit]

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4. New Publication: _Fronteras e Interculturalidad Entre Los Sefardies Occidentales_ (Stern)

Date: Fri, 22 Sep 2006 11:03:43 -0400

From: GobiMessage(at)ybp.com

via: pstern(at)library.umass.edu

Announcing the publication of PALOMA DIAZ-MAS, ed., _Fronteras e Interculturalidad Entre Los Sefardies Occidentales_ (Rodopi, 2006).

ISBN: 9042018992        

Series Title: FORO HISPANICO; Volume: 28        

US List: $39.00 USD

Peter Stern         

[ed.: very slight edit]                

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5.New in Paperback: _The Yiddish and Ladino Press in the Russian and Ottoman Empires_ (Stein)

Indiana University Press is pleased to announce the recent publication of:

Now in paperback

Making Jews Modern

The Yiddish and Ladino Press in the Russian and Ottoman Empires

Sarah Abrevaya Stein

“An engaging and thought-provoking analysis, . . . a pioneering foray into a new field of study, ‘Jews and Empires in History.’” —Slavic Review

On the eve of the 20th century, Jews in the Russian and Ottoman empires were caught up in the major cultural and social transformations that constituted modernity for Ashkenazi and Sephardi Jewries. What did it mean to be Jewish and Russian, Jewish and Ottoman, Jewish and modern? To answer these questions, Sarah Abrevaya Stein explores the texts most widely consumed by Jewish readers: popular newspapers in Yiddish and Ladino. This skillful comparative study yields new perspectives on the role of print culture in imagining national and transnational communities and the diverse ways in which modernity was envisioned under the rule of empire.

http://www.iupress.indiana.edu/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=40965

328 pages, 48 b&w photos

0-253-21893-4, paper $24.95

For Instructors

If you are interested in adopting this book for course use, please see our exam copy policy: http://www.iupress.indiana.edu/catalog/information.php?info_id=122&meid=122

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6. Job Opportunities: Chair in Jewish Studies & Hebrew Language Instructor at Indiana University (Deckard)

From: "Deckard, Melissa J" <mdeckard(at)indiana.edu> via: judaic(at)judnea.umass.edu

Date: Fri, 22 Sep 2006 11:46:35 -0400

Dear Colleagues,

 The Robert A. and Sandra S. Borns Jewish Studies Program at Indiana University is looking to fill the following faculty positions.  We would appreciate your help in getting the word out by circulating this message to interested scholars.

Thank you,

Professor Steven Weitzman, Director

Borns Jewish Studies Program

Indiana University

Goodbody Hall 326

1011 East Third Street

Bloomington, IN 47405-7005

Alvin H. Rosenfeld Chair in Jewish Studies

Indiana University, Bloomington is pleased to announce a search to fill the Alvin H. Rosenfeld Chair in Jewish Studies, an endowed position established to honor the founding director of the Robert A. and Sandra S. Borns Jewish Studies Program. The search committee welcomes applications from scholars in any field or discipline focused on Jewish culture, society, politics, history, art, literature or thought (the position will be jointly appointed with the appropriate department). The ideal candidate will be an outstanding scholar at the associate or full professor rank. The search committee will also consider applications from exceptionally promising scholars at the assistant professor rank.

 Applications received by November 3, 2006 will be assured of consideration.  Applications should include a cover letter, C.V., and a writing sample, and applicants should arrange to have three letters of recommendation sent to us by the deadline.  Please send all materials to Professor Steven Weitzman, Borns Jewish Studies Program, Indiana University, Goodbody Hall 326, 1011 East Third Street, Bloomington, Indiana 47405-7005.

  Indiana University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer that encourages applications from under represented minorities and women.

 Hebrew Lecturer and Visiting Hebrew Lecturer

 The Robert A. and Sandra S. Borns Jewish Studies Program at Indiana University invites applications for two positions, beginning fall semester 2007: (1) Lecturer in modern Hebrew; this position is non-tenure track but commitment to a multi-year contract is available for the ideal candidate and (2) a one-year appointment as a Visiting Lecturer in modern Hebrew.  Proficiency in native modern Hebrew is required for both positions, and previous experience in teaching modern Hebrew to American students at an institution of higher learning is advantageous.

 Each Lecturer will teach three classes per semester at one or more levels of modern Hebrew following a curriculum and texts in use in the Jewish Studies Program.  Salary will be competitive and commensurate with experience.

 Applications should include a letter of interest spelling out the candidate's teaching philosophy and goals, a curriculum vitae, and three letters of recommendation.  Applications received by November 3, 2006 will be assured of consideration.

 Send all materials to:  Professor Steven Weitzman, Director, Borns Jewish Studies Program, Indiana University, Goodbody Hall 326, 1011 E. Third Street, Bloomington, IN 47405-7005.

  Indiana University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer that encourages applications from under represented minorities and women.

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7. Long-term Post-Doctoral Fellowships at the Library Company of Philadelphia for 2007-2008 (The Library Company)

Date: Fri, 22 Sep 2006 11:23:00 -0400

From: jmcclyme <jmcclyme(at)ASSUMPTION.EDU>

 Long-term Post-Doctoral Fellowships at the Library Company of Philadelphia for 2007-2008

 Deadline: November 1, 2006

The Library Company of Philadelphia supports two long-term post-doctoral fellowships for which there is a November 1, 2006 deadline:

The NEH Post-Doctoral Fellowships support research in residence at the Library Company on any subject relevant to its collections, which are capable of supporting research in a variety of fields relating to the history of America and the Atlantic world from the 17th through the 19th centuries.

The Program in Early American Economy and Society (PEAES) Post-Doctoral Fellowships support research into the origins and development of the early American economy, broadly conceived, to roughly 1850, in the collections of the Library Company and other research institutions in the Philadelphia region.

THE DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF POST-DOCTORAL

APPLICATIONS IS NOVEMBER 1, 2006, with a decision to be made by December 15.

 To apply send six copies each of a brief resume, a short description of the proposed research, two letters of reference, and a writing sample on a relevant subject of no more than 25 pages to:

 Fellowships,

 Library Company,

 1314 Locust Street,

 Philadelphia,

 PA 19107.

 Visit our website for more detailed information! -

http://rs6.net/tn.jsp?t=nrivpybab.0.zb5iw9n6.ucra9yn6.716&ts=S0208&p=http%3A

 %2F%2Fwww.librarycompany.org

If you wish to apply for both fellowships, please send twelve copies of all materials.

 Applicants should also submit an online cover sheet available at www.librarycompany.org

 <http://www.librarycompany.org/>.

 For more information email jgreen(at)librarycompany.org

<mailto:jgreen(at)librarycompany.org> (NEH) or

cmatson(at)udel.edu <mailto:cmatson(at)udel.edu> (PEAES)

The Library Company

1314 Locust Street

Philadelphia, PA

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