Center Members

Micheal Krezmien, Ph.D

Assistant Professor
Special Education Program
University of Massachusetts Amherst

Michael Krezmien is an assistant professor in special education. His research interests include understanding and solving the complex problems facing high risk and proven risk youth. He is currently directing three major research initiatives. The first is as the Holyoke / Chicopee Shannon Community Safety Initiative Research Partner. This project examines prevention and intervention strategies to prevent youth violence and gang involvement. The second is the Holyoke 21st Century Project. Dr. Krezmien leads a collaborative team who are designing and implementing project based learning activities with high school students in the Holyoke Public School Alternative Education programs. The third is an international collaboration to develop empirical research on inclusion in the U.S., Germany, Turkey, and now Italy. Additionally, Dr. Krezmien is an expert in juvenile justice and school disciplinary problems as well as reading interventions for diverse learners. Finally, Dr. Krezmien researches disproportionate representation of minority students in special education, and minority students and students with disabilities in school suspensions.

Amanda M. Marcotte, Ph.D

Assistant Professor
School Psychology Program
University of Massachusetts Amherst

Amanda Marcotte researches educational practices designed to prevent academic and behavioral problems in schools. She investigates prevention through the relationship of assessment and intervention, researching measures that are used to identify of students with risk factors and evaluation procedures to assess effective instructional programming. Dr. Marcotte’s research draws on academic and behavioral interventions, school-based prevention programs, formative assessment and curriculum-based measurement, Specific Learning Disabilities, and preventative reading instruction.

Sharon F. Rallis, Ed.D

Dwight W. Allen Distinguished Professor
Center for Education Policy, Director
Educational Leadership Program, Coordinator
University of Massachusetts Amherst

Sharon Rallis is the Dwight W. Allen Distinguished Professor of Educational Policy and Reform in the Department of Education Policy, Research and Administration where she teaches courses in inquiry, program evaluation, qualitative methodology, and organizational theory. She serves as director of the Center for Education Policy and is associated with the Center for International Education. Over her more than 40 years working in education, Sharon has taught and counseled in U.S. K-12 public schools, been a school principal, served on a local school board, directed a U.S. federal school reform initiative, and held faculty positions at Vanderbilt University, Harvard Graduate School of Education, and the University of Connecticut. With an aim to inform and contribute to program improvement, she is interested in applied research; as an evaluator, she connects theory, research, and practice through conducting evaluation. Sharon’s expertise lies in methodology (qualitative research and program evaluation), and organizational theory and change. The 2005 president of the American Evaluation Association, she has conducted research and evaluations of educational, medical, and social organizations, agencies, and programs. She has worked with governmental agencies, foundations, service organizations and other non-profits, and school districts. Her work in evaluation is internationally known due to invited work and publications in China, Canada, Afghanistan, Palestine, and Japan.

Craig S. Wells, Ph.D

Associate Professor
Research and Evaluation Methods Program
University of Massachusetts Amherst

Craig S. Wells is an Associate Professor at the University of Massachusetts Amherst in the Research and Evaluation Methods Program and also serves as Associate Director in the Center for Educational Assessment. Dr. Wells received his PhD from the University of Wisconsin at Madison in 2004 in Quantitative Methods in Educational Psychology. Professor Wells teaches courses in statistical methods and structural equation modeling. His research interests include the study of non-parametric item response models, detection of differential item functioning or item bias, and assessment of IRT model fit. He also has a keen interest in the philosophy of science and its applications.

Sara Whitcomb, Ph.D

Assistant Professor
School Psychology Program
University of Massachusetts Amherst

Sara Whitcomb is currently an Assistant Professor in the School Psychology program in the Department of Student Development at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst. She has taught courses pertaining to developmental psychopathology, psychology in the classroom, behavioral assessment, and school-based consultation. Sara also works in a clinical setting with children and families and provides advanced clinical training to students at the UMASS Psychological Services Center. Sara’s current research and practical interests include promoting preventative social and emotional learning, mental health, and positive behavioral support systems in schools and behavioral consultation. Prior to receiving her doctorate from the University of Oregon, Sara held positions as a teacher in special education, kindergarten, and first-grade settings and as a behavioral consultant.

Rebecca Woodland, Ph.D

Associate Professor
Educational Leadership Program
University of Massachusetts Amherst
http://people.umass.edu/woodland/Rebecca_Woodland/Home.html

Rebecca H. Woodland is Associate Professor of Educational Leadership in the Department of Educational Policy, Research and Administration. She is a recognized scholar in the areas of leadership for curriculum and instruction, school improvement, and social network analysis (SNA). She has published numerous refereed journal articles, two encyclopedia entries and a book. Her publication, “Communities of Practice as an Analytical Construct: Implications for Theory & Practice,” was the International Journal of Public Administration’s most widely read article for 2009. Her most recent articles are: “Social Network Analysis and the Evaluation of Teacher Collaboration: A District Case Study” in press with the Journal of School Leadership and “A Validation Study of the Teacher Collaboration Assessment Survey” (June 2013) in Educational Research and Evaluation. Dr. Woodland is a member of the Editorial Board for the American Journal of Evaluation, and the 2005 winner of AEA's prestigious Marcia Guttentag Award. In addition to research, Dr. Woodland actively works to build innovative and effective school-university partnerships and engage in state level policy making. From 2007-2010, she led the team that developed the Massachusetts' Standards and Indicators of Effective Administrative Leadership Practice, and she was recently appointed to the Design Team for the Performance Assessment for MA Leaders Project by the Office of Educator Policy, Preparation and Leadership at the MA Department of Elementary & Secondary Education. Dr. Woodland is a member of the Connecticut Valley Superintendents Roundtable and works closely with teams of school leaders in the northeast and mid-Atlantic regions of the US to build K-12 system capacity for high quality instruction and disciplined teacher collaboration that lead to increases in student engagement and achievement.

Ximena Zúñiga, Ph.D

Associate Professor
Social Justice Education Program, Coordinator
University of Massachusetts Amherst

Ximena Zúñiga, University of Michigan, a national leader of diversity, equity and social justice issues in education in higher education. Dr. Zúñiga's background is in critical philosophy and critical pedagogy, participatory education, and action research. Her initial work was in literacy work and popular education in non-formal adult education programs in her native Chile. Before joining the faculty at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Dr. Zúñiga directed the Program on Intergroup Relations at the University of Michigan where she participated in developing the intergroup dialogue educational model in higher education. She has served as PI and Co-PI on several international, national and local grants including the Inclusive University Initiative at Pune University in India (Obama Singh Grant, 2013-2016), Multi-University Intergroup Dialogue Research Project (W.T.Grant & Ford Foundation, 2005-2008) and Pluralism and Unity Initiative at UMASS Amherst (W. & F. Hewlett Foundation 1998-2002). She is co-editor of Multicultural Teaching in the University (1993), Readings for Diversity and Social Justice (2001; 2010; 2013; (Routledge); Intergroup Dialogue: Engaging Difference, Social Identities, and Social Justice (Routledge, 2014). She is co-author of Intergroup dialogue in higher education: Meaningful learning about social justice (2007;Jossey-Bass) and Dialogues across difference: Practice, theory and research on intergroup dialogues (2013; Russell Sage Foundation). She recently co-edited a special issue for the Journal of Equity and Excellence in Education on intergroup dialogues in k-12, higher education and communities (February 2012). Recent articles and book chapters address racism, immigration & globalization issues in anti-racist education, diversity and social justice education in higher education, and theory, practice, and research on dialogues across differences in higher education and communities. She teaches foundations courses in social justice education, theory, practice and research on intergroup dialogue in K-12 schools, colleges and universities, and communities, and a multi-section intergroup dialogue undergraduate course:http://people.umass.edu/educ202-xzuniga/index.html

Center Fellows

Elysia Clemens, Ph.D

Associate Professor
Department of Applied Psychology & Counselor Education
University of Northern Colorado

Elysia Clemens is an associate professor at the University of Northern Colorado. Current research projects are focused on educational outcomes for youth in the child welfare system. The goal of her research is to inform policy. She serving as the project director to design a system for Colorado Department of Education to measure the investments being made in the state related to dropout prevention and student engagement. She is also collaborating on the development of a software application “Apprentice-Counseling” to improve supervision of counseling students during practicum and internship.

Maru Gonzales, M.Ed

Doctoral Student
Social Justice Education Program
University of Massachusetts Amherst

Maru Gonzalez is a doctoral candidate in the Social Justice Education program at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, the co-founder of Georgia Safe Schools Coalition, a member of the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network's (GLSEN) National Advisory Council, a board member for Soulforce, and a former Georgia school counselor. Maru combines her applied experiences as a safe schools advocate and social justice educator to her related scholarly interests regarding school counselor advocacy, school climate, and LGBT students’ school experiences. An expert on educational policy and educational practice, she has worked with lobbyists and congressional representatives to change legislation at the local, state, and national levels and has appeared as a regular commentator on both CNN and CNN Español.

Megan M. Krell, Ph.D, NCC

Assistant Professor
Behavioral Sciences Program
Fitchburg State University

Megan Krell is an assistant professor and internship coordinator in human services and counseling at Fitchburg State University in Fitchburg, Massachusetts. Megan received her doctoral degree in Counselor Education and Counseling Psychology from the University of Connecticut. She has a Master of Arts in School Counseling from the University of Connecticut and she graduated from Northeastern University with a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and Human Services. Megan’s research interests include college and career readiness initiatives in school counseling, equitable college readiness counseling for students with disabilities, and using technology to enhance teaching.

Ian Martin, Ed.D

Assistant Professor
Counseling Program
University of San Diego

Ian Martin is an assistant professor at the University of San Diego within the Counseling program and teaches classes in school counseling and career development. Prior to coming to USD, he was a school counselor at the elementary and middle school levels. Ian completed his doctorate at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst and worked as a Research Assistant within CSCORE. He credits CSCORE with shaping his current research agenda and is honored to continue his relationship with CSCORE as a Center Fellow. Ian has published and presented on such topics as program development, evaluation and school counseling policy.

Timothy A. Poynton, Ed.D

Associate Professor
School Counseling Program, Director
Suffolk University

Tim Poynton is an associate professor and director of the school counseling program at Suffolk University in Boston, MA. A former school counselor in New York State, Dr. Poynton has shifted the focus of his work from practicing school counseling to school counselor education and research. He worked as a research fellow at the Center for School Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation in 2004-2005, and is the developer of EZAnalyze, a data analysis tool for school counselors. Dr. Poynton is a co-PI on a recently awarded $600,000 NSF S-STEM grant, and is engaged in research examining the postsecondary transitions of graduates of 16 Massachusetts high schools in 2012.

Brett Zyromski, Ph.D

Associate Professor
School Counseling Program, Director
Northern Kentucky University

Brett Zyromski is co-founder and co-chair of the national Evidence-Based School Counseling Conference. He is involved with the American School Counselor Association (ASCA) as one of fifteen Lead Recognized-ASCA-Model-Program Reviewers (LRR’s) nationwide, and has also serves as a trainer of the ASCA National Model for the American School Counselor Association. Recently, Dr. Zyromski was a writer and service provider for a 1.2 million dollar Elementary and Secondary School Counseling Grant received by the Northern Kentucky Cooperative for Educational Services. Dr. Zyromski has published over a dozen articles related to school counseling issues, and has delivered over 30 national, regional, and local presentations. He was the invited chair of the revision team for the Development Counseling Model for Illinois Schools and founded and coordinated the Southern Illinois School Counseling Interest Network. Dr. Zyromski has consulted with numerous school districts on evolving guidance programs to data-driven, comprehensive school counseling programs. He has provided workshops on crisis preparation and response in schools, supervision in counseling, using school counseling to change sundown town communities, and data-driven school counseling practices. Dr. Zyromski has served as a reviewer for the Professional School Counseling Journal and has been recognized for numerous awards and recognitions, including the 2010 North Central Association for Counselor Education and Supervision Professional Leadership Award, the 2010 Illinois School Counseling Association Presidential Award, and the 2008 North Central Association for Counselor Education and Supervision Outstanding Professional Teaching Award.

Jessica Bertolani, University of Verona Italy