Undergraduate Program

Welcome to the Department of Resource Economics

B.S. Resource Economics

Resource Economics prepares students to assist in public and private decisions about environmental and natural resource issues. Population and income growth are increasing the pressure on our resources, making allocation, management, and protection decisions among our top priorities. Water quality and supply, land use, climate change, pesticide policy, recycling, waste disposal, and marine fisheries management are some of the issues studied. Students learn to apply decision making tools such as benefit-cost, risk-benefit, and cost-effectiveness analysis. They also engage in work related to environmental economics, natural resource economics, public policy, experimental economics, and behavioral economics.

B.S. Managerial Economics

Managerial economics applies microeconomic theory and data analysis to business decision making. Students develop expertise in accounting, finance, business strategies, and market demand analysis. They also engage in work related to industrial organization, public policy, experimental economics, and behavioral economics. Microeconomic models and case studies are incorporated into the curriculum to demonstrate how an individual can make wise choices to operate effectively within a complex economy of millions of businesses linked by thousands of markets.

The Experience

As a Resource Economics or Managerial Economics major, you’ll dive into a math-heavy curriculum that trains you to analyze data. You’ll gain a strong foundation in microeconomics and quantitative methods. Your professors will challenge you to think outside the box to creatively respond to society’s unanswered questions and unsolved problems. Our classes, which emphasize team-based learning, will provide you with real world skills that you’ll apply in your career or in graduate school.

What You’ll Learn

Resource Economics and Managerial Economics students complete twelve departmental core courses that focus on economic theory, quantitative methods, and communication skills.

Resource Economics students then complete five required courses related to environmental economics, natural resource economics, public policy, and cost-benefit analysis and five upper-level electives selected from a departmental list.

Managerial Economics students then complete six required courses related to accounting, management, finance, industrial organization, public policy, and managerial decision making and four upper-level electives selected from a departmental list.

Students can also:

  • Have opportunities for advanced study in microeconomics and econometrics, including both undergraduate and graduate courses.
  • Develop an Honors research project with one of our faculty members on an important current issue.
  • Assist with economic experiments as part of a faculty research project, or perhaps an Honors research project.
  •  Work as an undergraduate teaching assistant in one of our introductory or intermediate microeconomics or computing courses.
  • Apply for one (or more!) of our departmental scholarships each spring.
  • Be a member or Executive Officer of the Resource Economics Society, our department’s student organization.
  • Gain insights into private firm and government employment by meeting with Department of Resource Economics alumni through our career and professional development programs, including a yearly student-alumni networking event at the UMass Club in Boston.

What You’ll Do with Your Degree

Resource Economics prepares graduates for careers in research, planning, education, and administration with federal, state, or community governments, as well as in private businesses that provide services in various environmental and natural resource areas. It also prepares graduates to pursue graduate degrees in Resource Economics, Economics, and other fields.

Managerial Economics career opportunities include research, planning, marketing, and managerial positions in a wide range of firms and governmental agencies. Recent graduates hold positions in finance, insurance, banking, management, market research, merchandising, recruiting, consulting, and strategic planning as well as pursue graduate degrees in Resource Economics, Economics, and other fields.