# Title Instructor Time Gen
Ed
Philosophy
Major
old new
100A Intro to Philosophy Garcia MW 11:15-12:05 AL

This course offers a survey of many central philosophical topics: skepticism, personal identity, free will, arguments for and against the existence of God, the nature of moral right and wrong, and the meaning of life.  Some of the philosophers we will discuss include Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, Kant, Mill, Nietzsche, and Camus.

100B

Intro to Philosophy

Bricker

MW 12:20 + disc

AL
Topics include:  the existence of God, skepticism about the external world, the problem of induction, the mind-body problem, minds and machines, consciousness, free will, and personal identity.
Textbook:  Introduction to Philosophy, 5th ed., edited by John Perry, Michael Bratman, and John Fischer.

100H

Honors Intro to Philosophy

Garcia

TuTh 2:30-3:45

AL
forthcoming

110

Intro to Logic

Klement

TuTh 1:00-2:15

R2 Logic Logic
Introduction to symbolic logic, including sentential and predicate logic. Focus on translating English statements into symbolic notation, and evaluation of arguments for validity using formal proof techniques. Text: Hardegree, Symbolic Logic: A First Course, 3rd ed. Requirements: homework and exams. Prerequisites: none.

160

Intro to Ethics

Meacham

TuTh 1:00 + disc

AT Ethics Value
In the first half of the class we'll discuss some of the main theories that have been offered for evaluating what one ought and ought not to do, such as Ethical Relativism, Ethical Skepticism, the Divine Command theory, Utilitarianism, Kantianism, and the Social Contract Theory. In the second half of the class we'll turn to look at some controversial issues in ethics, with possible topics including animal  rights, euthanasia, abortion, infanticide, parental responsibilities,  neonatal circumcision and children's rights.

160H

Honors Intro to Ethics

Kristian Olsen

TuTh 4:00-5:15

AT Ethics Value
forthcoming

164.1

Medical Ethics

Scott Hill

MWF 1:25 AT Ethics Value
This class will provide a survey of some of the topics in medical ethics, with possible topics including cloning, distribution of medical resources, homosexuality, abortion, and animal experimentation.

164.2

Medical Ethics

Matt Gifford

MWF 10:10 AT Ethics Value
This class will provide a survey of some of the topics in medical ethics, with possible topics including cloning, distribution of medical resources, homosexuality, abortion, and animal experimentation.

164.3

Medical Ethics

James Patten

MWF 2:30 AT Ethics Value
This class will provide a survey of some of the topics in medical ethics, with possible topics including cloning, distribution of medical resources, homosexuality, abortion, and animal experimentation.

164.4

Medical Ethics

Jayme Johnson

MWF 11:15 AT Ethics Value
RAP COURSE.
This class will provide a survey of some of the topics in medical ethics, with possible topics including cloning, distribution of medical resources, homosexuality, abortion, and animal experimentation.

164.5

Medical Ethics

Jim Binkoski

TuTh 1:00-2:15 AT Ethics Value
RAP COURSE.
This class will provide a survey of some of the topics in medical ethics, with possible topics including cloning, distribution of medical resources, homosexuality, abortion, and animal experimentation.

164.6

Medical Ethics

Jesse Fitts

TuTh 8:00-9:15 AT Ethics Value
This class will provide a survey of some of the topics in medical ethics, with possible topics including cloning, distribution of medical resources, homosexuality, abortion, and animal experimentation.

164.7

Medical Ethics

Joshua DiPaolo

TuTh 8:00-9:15 AT Ethics Value
This class will provide a survey of some of the topics in medical ethics, with possible topics including cloning, distribution of medical resources, homosexuality, abortion, and animal experimentation.

164H

Honors Medical Ethics

Peter Marchetto

TuTh 11:15-12:30

AT Ethics Value
This class will provide a survey of some of the topics in medical ethics, with possible topics including cloning, distribution of medical resources, homosexuality, abortion, and animal experimentation.

170

Problems in Social Thought

Ed Ferrier

MWF 9:05

SB Value
This course is an introduction to modern Western political and social philosophy. We will focus on key works by Machiavelli, Locke, Rousseau, Mill, and Marx and on questions about the nature and limits of political power, rights, and liberty.

310

Intermediate Logic

Hardegree

TuTh 1:00-2:15

R2 Logic Logic
Continuation of Philosophy 110.  Three logical systems are examined: (1) Function Logic, (2) Identity Logic, (3) Description Logic.  Work is equally divided between translating English sentences into symbolic notation, and constructing formal derivations.  Requirements: seven exams.  Prerequisite: Philosophy 110, or consent of the instructor.
Click here for WebSite.

321

History of Modern Philosophy

O’Neill

TuTh 2:30-3:45

HS Hist Hist(A)

This course is a survey of texts from the early modern period (16th-18th centuries) by canonical male, and recently rediscovered female, European rationalist and empiricist philosophers.  Figures may include Descartes, Elisabeth of Bohemia, Malebranche, Astell, Cavendish, Berkeley, and Hume. Historical and literary interpretation will supplement philosophical analysis in reconstructing the arguments in these works.  Students are expected to utilize critical reasoning skills in their evaluations of these arguments.  Students will have ample opportunity to demonstrate their mastery of interpretive and analytical skills in the weekly at-home writing assignment, and in the essay exams.  The course will focus on central metaphysical, theological and epistemological themes, including scepticism, causation, mind-body problems, the mechanical account of bodies, the existence of God, the problem of induction, and a priori knowledge.  Given the importance and breadth of the texts and topics covered, the stress on critical evaluation of arguments, and the emphasis on written and verbal expression, this course meets the objectives of the General Education (Historical Studies) curriculum.  Prerequisites: two courses in philosophy. This course is not open to students who have taken Phil 330 with the instructor.

334

American Philosophy

Josh Moulton

MWF 11:15

Hist
A study of American philosophy from the 18th c. through the 20th c. Beginning with Jonathan Edwards, the great Calvinist philosopher, and moving through the 19th c. philosophers influenced by Darwin, we will consider the influence of theology and of Darwinian theory on American thought. Since pragmatism is America's distinctive contribution to philosophy, we will pay special attention to the pragmatists - Peirce, James and Dewey - and to their successors (such as Quine, Davidson and Rorty). Prerequisite: one course in Philosophy.

336

Existential Philosophy

Ben Rancourt

MWF 10:10

AL Hist
An introduction to the main themes of Existentialism through seminal writing by Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Sartre.

336

Existential Philosophy

Brandy Burfield

MWF 9:05

AL Hist
An introduction to the main themes of Existentialism through seminal writing by Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Sartre.

341

Intro to Metaphysics

Miles Tucker

TuTh 11:15-12:30

M&E

This course will provide an introduction to analytic metaphysics by way of fundamental problems in ontology. In particular, we will examine contemporary views about (i) universals and particulars (ii) propositions and facts and (iii) possible worlds and individuals. In each case our focus will be on careful formulation of the relevant doctrines and arguments. Requirements: participation and attendance, two exams, a short presentation and a term paper. Text: M. Loux, Metaphysics: A Contemporary Introduction, 3rd Edition (Routledge: 2006).

342

Intro to Epistemology

Darin Harootunian

MWF 2:30

M&E

In this course, we will attempt to answer two major questions: 1) Can we know anything with certainty? And 2) Without certainty, what does knowledge amount to? In response to the first question, we will consider varieties of Skepticism, or the idea that we cannot know anything. In response to the second, we will consider contemporary theories of knowledge and justified belief. Toward the end of the semester, we will address a few specific topics according to student interest. Potential additional topics include: A Priori Knowledge, Feminist Epistemology, Other Minds, Naturalized Epistemology, Perception, Self-Knowledge, Testimony, and Virtue Epistemology. Class requirements will include two short papers and one term paper.

343

Intro to Philosophy of Art

Heidi Buetow

MWF 1:25

Value
What is art? This class will begin by pursuing this question and will proceed through several more specific questions about the meaning and value of art. Readings will be contemporary and from the analytic tradition. Students will write a mid term paper and a term paper. At least one prior class in philosophy is strongly recommended.

383

Intro to Philosophy of Religion

Casey Knight

MWF 12:20

M&E
Consideration of issues that arise when one thinks philosophically about religion. These include the question of the nature of God, the question whether there is a God, the question of how, and whether, one might come to know about God, and the question whether religion and science are compatible. Requirements: two exams and a final paper.
398W Junior Year Writing O'Neill by arrangement JYW
A 1-credit pass/fail course that must be taken in conjunction with Philosophy 321; it satisfies the University Junior Year Writing Requirement.

500

Contemporary Problems
(Senior-Seminar)

O’Neill

W 3:35-6:05

Our focus will be contemporary debates about early modern causation. Seventeenth- and eighteenth-century philosophers, such as Descartes, Malebranche, Princess Elisabeth, Astell, Cavendish and Leibniz, struggled to make their metaphysical commitments about substance and causation compatible with their theological views, as well as with the tenets of the new mechanical science.   Twenty-first century historians of philosophy have heated debates about the proper way to interpret the views of these important philosophers and their arguments for these views.

Each week, we will read selections from the early modern texts and one article by a leading contemporary historian of philosophy. We will critically evaluate the historian’s reconstruction of the arguments in these texts. This course could be entitled “How To Do Philosophy Historically.”  We will compare the techniques and tools that individual historians use, and engage in the practice of the history of philosophy ourselves, while developing our own strategies of interpretation.  Some of the specific issues we will treat will be causal principles; mechanical causation; mind-body causal interaction; divine causation and whether that leaves any room for creaturely causation; occasionalism and occasional causation; and causal harmonies.  We will trace how problems with Cartesian efficient causation ultimately lead to Hume’s regularity account of causation. 

Requirements: seminar presentations, an outline and bibliography for a paper at midterm time, and a term paper that is developed from the midterm outline.

514

Math Logic 2

Klement

MWF 11:15-12:05

  Logic Logic
Introduction to and comparative study of various logical foundations of mathematics, including classical set-theoretical foundations (ZF, NBG), Quine’s “New Foundations” and related systems, higher-order logic and type theory, Frege arithmetic, and others, as well as related logical meta-theory and philosophical issues concerning mathematical and logical entities. Text: William S. Hatcher The Logical Foundations of Mathematics and various shorter pieces. Prerequisites: Phil 310 Intermediate Logic or consent of instructor.

553

Philosophy of Science

Meacham

M 12:30-3:00

M&E

This class will focus on puzzles in decision theory. The class will begin by covering the basics of decision theory, and then move on to look at various puzzles, and the variants of decision theory they've resulted in. Topics are will include: (i) Newcomb's Case and related puzzles (and a discussion of causal vs. evidential decision theory), (ii) the Death in Damascus Case and related puzzles (and a discussion of decision instability), (iii) the Pasadena Case/Two-Envelope Paradox and related puzzles (and a discussion of infinitary extensions of decision theory), (iv) the Satan's Apple Case (and a discussion of binding).

571

Philosophy and Feminist Thought

Antony

TuTh 1:00-2:15

This term we’ll focus on issues at the intersection of feminist theory and the philosophy of language.  We’ll begin by looking at speech act theory, and the speech act analysis of pornography, developed by Rae Langton as an elaboration of Catherine MacKinnon’s claim that pornography does not merely cause the subordination of women, but is itself a form of subordination.  We’ll next look at recent work within philosophy, linguistics and psychology on generic constructions (e.g., “ticks carry Lyme disease”), work that is uncovering mechanisms by which pernicious stereotyping might be inculcated and perpetuated.  After that, we’ll turn to the issue of hateful epithets, utilizing some recent work of Mark Richard: how do we characterize the semantic properties of such expressions?  Is the hatefulness they express part of the meanings of such terms, or merely a pragmatic effect?  Does the existence of such terms challenge the adequacy of conventional views of meaning?  Finally, if time permits, we will consider briefly questions about “feminist philosophy of language”: is there/could there be/need there be any such thing?

592d

Death

Graham

Tu 7:00-9:30p

Death confronts us all. And to most of us, it is a terrifying prospect. But just a little thought about death reveals a host of interesting and difficult philosophical questions. Among the many that we'll discuss in this course are: What is death? Is it possible to survive death and if so, what might such survival consist in? If surviving death is not possible and death marks the permanent end of our existence, is it a bad thing to die? And even if it is often a bad thing to die, might it ever be a good thing to die, and in what way could this be true? Whether death is bad for the one who dies, is death something that it is rational to fear? Is the wrongness of killing explicable in terms of the badness of the death of its victim? If not, how else might it be explicable? Pre-requisites: three courses in philosophy, at least one of which at the 300 level or higher.

595S

Formal Semantics

Hardegree

TuTh 9:30-10:45

We usually understand novel sentences – e.g., this one – with little or no hesitation. How do we accomplish this? According to the received opinion, our linguistic knowledge divides into two modules – roughly, words and rules – which in turn correspond respectively to Lexical Grammar and Compositional Grammar. The present course concerns Compositional Grammar, more specifically Compositional Semantics – the study of how the meanings of compound expressions are derived from the meanings of their parts. We pursue this enterprise within the framework of Categorial Grammar – more specifically, within the framework of Type-Logical Grammar. Topics will include: set theory, type theory, lambda-calculus, categorial syntax and semantics, type-logical syntax and semantics. Prerequisite: Phil 511, or graduate status, or consent of the instructor. Requirements: homework assignments. Click here for website.