# Title Instructor Time Gen
Ed
Philosophy Major
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100A Intro to Philosophy Garcia MW 11:15-12:05 AL
This course offers a basic survey of many important philosophical topics: skepticism, arguments for and against the existence of God, free will, the nature of moral rightness and wrongness, and the meaning of life.  Some of the philosophers we will discuss include Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, Kant, Mill, Nietzsche, and Camus.
100B Intro to Philosophy Antony TuTh 1:00-1:50 AL

An introduction to the methods and subject matter of philosophy, through detailed examination of several important philosophical issues: personal identity and the possibility of immortality, the rationality of belief in God, and the nature of ethical obligation.  Readings will be drawn from historical and contemporary sources.

100H Honors Intro to Philosophy Tucker TuTh 4:00-5:15 AL
This course will provide an introduction to some of the central issues in Western academic philosophy. We will discuss (i) puzzles about free will and moral responsibility; (ii) the philosophical nature of persons; and (iii) arguments for and against the existence of God. In each case, our focus will be on careful formulation of the relevant doctrines and arguments. Requirements: Participation and attendance, reading assignments, two exams and a short paper.
110 Intro to Logic Klement TuTh 1:00-2:15 R2 Logic Logic
Introduction to symbolic logic, including sentential and predicate logic. Focus on translating English statements into symbolic notation, and evaluation of arguments for validity using formal proof techniques. Text: Hardegree, Symbolic Logic: A First Course, 3rd ed. Requirements: homework and exams. Prerequisites: none.
160 Intro to Ethics Meacham MW 12:20-1:10 AT Ethics Value
In the first half of the class we'll discuss some of the main theories that have been offered for evaluating what one ought and ought not to do, such as Ethical Relativism, Ethical Skepticism, the Divine Command theory, Utilitarianism, Kantianism, and the Social Contract Theory. In the second half of the class we'll turn to look at some controversial issues in ethics, with possible topics including animal  rights, euthanasia, abortion, infanticide, parental responsibilities,  neonatal circumcision and children's rights.
160 Intro to Ethics Patten TuTh 1:00-2:15 AT Ethics Value

Open to Global Opportunities RAP students only.
This class meets in Northeast Residential Area

Consideration of some of the most important theories about right and wrong, good and evil, and virtue and vice.  In each case, one focus will be on clear and accurate formulation of the theory.  Another focus will be on understanding and evaluating classic objections to the theory.  Readings from Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Bentham, Mill, Kant, Ross, Moore, and others.

160H Honors Intro to Ethics Ferrier TuTh 2:30-3:45 AT Ethics Value
A survey of ethical debates with special focus on metaethics. Some of
the topics we will discuss are: (1) moral realism and its anti-realist alternatives, (2) the
reasons for being moral, (3) moral explanation, (4) moral supervenience. This class will be
time-consuming! Students should expect to spend AT LEAST two hours per reading
assignment. Text: Foundations of Ethics edited by Russ Shafer-Landau and Terence Cuneo
(2007: Blackwell). Grade: class participation, homework assignments, exams.
161 Intro to Social Thought Harootunian MWF 9:05-9:55 SB Value

Survey of theories of the ideal relation between citizens and states, focusing on classic defenses and critiques of the state, democracy, citizenship, civil disobedience, gender, and problems of globalization.

164 Medical Ethics Olsen MWF 10:10-11:00 AT Ethics Value
An introduction to ethics through issues of medicine and health care. Topics include abortion,  treatment of impaired infants, euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, truth-telling, medical experimentation on human beings and on animals, and the allocation of scarce medical resources.  (Gen.Ed. AT)
164 Medical Ethics Marchetto MWF 1:25-2:15 AT Ethics Value
An introduction to ethics through issues of medicine and health care. Topics include abortion,  treatment of impaired infants, euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, truth-telling, medical experimentation on human beings and on animals, and the allocation of scarce medical resources.
164 Medical Ethics Cox MWF 2:30-3:20 AT Ethics Value
An introduction to ethics through issues of medicine and health care. Topics include abortion,  treatment of impaired infants, euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, truth-telling, medical experimentation on human beings and on animals, and the allocation of scarce medical resources.
164 Medical Ethics Krakauer TuTh 11:15-12:30 AT Ethics Value

Open to students in any RAP program from the Southwest Residential Area.

An introduction to ethics through issues of medicine and health care. Topics include abortion,  treatment of impaired infants, euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, truth-telling, medical experimentation on human beings and on animals, and the allocation of scarce medical resources.

164H Honors Medical Ethics Eddon TuTh 11:15-12:30 AT Ethics Value

This class will provide a survey of some of the topics in medical ethics, with possible topics including cloning, distribution of medical resources, homosexuality, abortion, and animal experimentation.

310 Intermediate Logic Hardegree TuTh 1:00-2:15 R2 Logic Logic
Continuation of Philosophy 110.  Three logical systems are examined: (1) Function Logic, (2) Identity Logic, (3) Description Logic.  Work is equally divided between translating English sentences into symbolic notation, and constructing formal derivations.  Requirements: seven exams.  Prerequisite: Philosophy 110, or consent of the instructor.
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321 History of Modern Philosophy O’Neill TuTh 2:30-3:45 HS Hist Hist(B)

This course is a survey of texts from the early modern period (16th-18th centuries) by canonical male, and recently rediscovered female, European rationalist and empiricist philosophers.  Figures may include Descartes, Elisabeth of Bohemia, Malebranche, Astell, Cavendish, Berkeley, and Hume. Historical and literary interpretation will supplement philosophical analysis in reconstructing the arguments in these works.  Students are expected to utilize critical reasoning skills in their evaluations of these arguments.  Students will have ample opportunity to demonstrate their mastery of interpretive and analytical skills in the weekly at-home writing assignment, and in the essay exams.  The course will focus on central metaphysical, theological and epistemological themes, including scepticism, causation, mind-body problems, the mechanical account of bodies, the existence of God, the problem of induction, and a priori knowledge.  Given the importance and breadth of the texts and topics covered, the stress on critical evaluation of arguments, and the emphasis on written and verbal expression, this course meets the objectives of the General Education (Historical Studies) curriculum.  Prerequisites: two courses in philosophy. This course is not open to students who have taken Phil 330 with the instructor.

334 American Philosophy Burfield MWF 11:15-12:05 Hist
A study of American philosophy from the 18th c. through the 20th c. Beginning with Jonathan Edwards, the great Calvinist philosopher, and moving through the 19th c. philosophers influenced by Darwin, we will consider the influence of theology and of Darwinian theory on American thought. Since pragmatism is America's distinctive contribution to philosophy, we will pay special attention to the pragmatists - Peirce, James and Dewey - and to their successors (such as Quine, Davidson and Rorty). Prerequisite: one course in Philosophy.
336 Existential Philosophy Hill MWF 10:10-11:00 AL Hist
An introduction to the main themes of Existentialism through seminal writing by Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Sartre.
336 Existential Philosophy Robison MWF 9:05-9:55 AL Hist
An introduction to the main themes of Existentialism through seminal writing by Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Sartre.
341 Intro to Metaphysics Binkoski M 3:35-6:05 M&E

An introduction to topics concerning the nature of space and time.  The first third of the course will focus on questions concerning the nature of space and time in Newtonian mechanics.  From there, we transition from space and time to spacetime, and an introduction to the special and general theories of relativity.  The last third of the course will focus on questions concerning the metaphysics of time and the possibility of time travel.  Requirements: at least two courses in philosophy and a strong stomach for math and physics.

342 Intro to Epistemology Cushing TuTh 4:00-5:15 M&E
In this course, we will attempt to answer two major questions: 1) Can we know anything with certainty? And 2) Without certainty, what does knowledge amount to? In response to the first question, we will consider varieties of Skepticism, or the idea that we cannot know anything. In response to the second, we will consider contemporary theories of knowledge and justified belief. Toward the end of the semester, we will address a few specific topics according to student interest. Potential additional topics include: A Priori Knowledge, Feminist Epistemology, Other Minds, Naturalized Epistemology, Perception, Self-Knowledge, Testimony, and Virtue Epistemology. Class requirements will include two short papers and one term paper.
361 Philosophy of Art Buetow MWF 1:25-2:15 Value

The title of this course is “Matters of Taste”. We will discus various topics relating to both aesthetic and gustatory taste such as: What does it mean to say someone has good taste -- do some people have better tastes in art, literature, music, or food than others? What is the relationship between aesthetic taste and gustatory taste? What is the nature of beauty and what is its relationship to aesthetic taste? What is the importance of taste or beauty in life and in art? What is the relationship between pleasure and taste? What are the limits of taste -- can disturbing or revolting things be aesthetically valuable? Note: this is course in aesthetics and not a survey course on the philosophy of art (though we will cover many issues relating to taste in art.)

362 Approaches to Politics and Society Levine TuTh 11:15-12:30 Value
An investigation into foundational issues in political theory, such as the basis of state authority, the nature of property rights, balancing the values of individual autonomy and equality, and the question of nationalism.  Readings from Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Mill, Marx, Rawls, Nozick, and others.
383 Philosophy of Religion Rancourt MWF 12:20-1:10 M&E
Consideration of issues that arise when one thinks philosophically about religion.  These include arguments for the existence of God, the need (or lack of need) for such arguments, the divine attributes, the problem of evil, the nature of religious experience, and the relation of religion to science.
398W Junior Year Writing O'Neill by arrangement
A 1-credit pass/fail course that must be taken in conjunction with Philosophy 321; it satisfies the University Junior Year Writing Requirement.
550 Epistemology Kornblith M 12:45-3:15 M&E
This course will focus on the role of intuitions in theory construction in philosophy.  Many see the standard philosophical method as follows.  Intuitions about some subject are canvassed—the nature of knowledge, justified belief, the right, the good, etc.—and our intuitions are treated as data which philosophical theories should systematize and explain.  Our intuitions thus play much the same role that observation plays in scientific theory construction.  But there are worries about this methodology.  What reason is there to think that our intuitions about philosophical subjects have anything like the reliability that observation does?  If our intuitions are not reliable, then we have no reason at all to believe theories which systematize and explain them.  We will look at a number of authors who seek to defend the method of appeals to intuition, as well as recent challenges.  Readings will include work by Bealer, Cummins, Goldman, Kornblith, Stich, Weatherson, Weinberg, Williamson, and others.  A short paper and a longer term paper will be required.
582 Philosophy of Science Meacham Th 1:00-3:30 M&E
This class will provide a gentle introduction to Bayesianism. We'll  sketch the basic framework, look at some of the standard issues  regarding confirmation which Bayesianism is supposed to resolve,  explore some of the consequences of Bayesianism, and examine some of  the different ways the Bayesian framework can be developed. In the  latter part of the class we'll look at some of the criticisms that  have been raised against the Bayesian approach, and explore how they  might be answered.
591N Nicomachean Ethics Matthews W 12:45-3:15 Value

CANCELLED

This course will be a close reading of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics in tandem with important commentary literature, including  two or three published papers by authors who once took a similar course at UMass. Students will be expected to make one or two presentations on sections of Aristotle, plus one or two presentations on a commentary piece,  and then write a seminar paper at the end. Texts: Aristotle, The Nicomachean Ethicsm Oxford (Ross ranslation), and The Blackwell Guide to Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics, Richard Kraut, ed., Blackwell, 2006, plus two or three xeroxed papers.

592G Philosophy of gender in 17th & 18th C O'Neill W 3:35-6:05 Hist Hist(A)

We will begin with an examination of Aristotle’s metaphysical views about gender difference, as well as some key medieval and Renaissance texts on this issue. These works will give us the historical backdrop to the seventeenth- and eighteenth-century debates about gender equality and difference.  We will examine Gournay’s use of Pyrrhonean sceptical arguments, and Schurman’s use of Aristotelian views and his syllogistic logic, in addressing issues about women’s moral and cognitive abilities, and the social roles appropriate for women.  We will then turn to recent debates in the secondary literature about whether Descartes’ philosophical method and his doctrine of mind-body distinctness helped to pave the way for a post-Aristotelian, early modern picture of gender difference—one in which women would play little or no role in the search after scientific knowledge.   In order to have a better historical grasp of these issues, we will look at the strikingly different views about gender difference in the work of two of Descartes’ 17th-century followers, Poullain de la Barre and Malebranche, as well as Lambert’s 18th-century response to them. The end of the course will be devoted to Enlightenment debates on gender just prior to the French Revolution; we will focus on the work of Rousseau and Wollstonecraft, among others.  Prerequisites for undergraduates: two 300-level courses in philosophy. The course will be conducted as a seminar.

594S Semantics Hardegree TuTh 9:30-10:45
We usually understand novel sentences – e.g., this one – with little or no hesitation. How do we accomplish this? According to the received opinion, our linguistic knowledge divides into two modules – roughly, words and rules – which in turn correspond respectively to Lexical Grammar and Compositional Grammar. The present course concerns Compositional Grammar, more specifically Compositional Semantics – the study of how the meanings of compound expressions are derived from the meanings of their parts. We pursue this enterprise within the framework of Categorial Grammar – more specifically, within the framework of Type-Logical Grammar. Topics will include: set theory, type theory, lambda-calculus, categorial syntax and semantics, type-logical syntax and semantics. Prerequisite: Phil 511, or graduate status, or consent of the instructor. Requirements: homework assignments. Click here for website.