100 A- Introduction to Philosophy (AL)
MW 2:30-3:20
Chappell, 380 Bartlett
Two lectures, one discussion per week. An introduction to philosophical thinking, stressing the formulation and evaluation of logical arguments. Readings include traditional as well as contemporary works. Discussion of such topics as the nature of knowledge, the human mind, death and immortality, the existence of God, and the problem of evil. Texts: Plato, Apology, Crito, Meno, and Phaedo; Descartes, Meditations; two recent dialogues by John Perry. Requirements: several quizzes and exams, final exam.

100 B - Introduction to Philosophy (AL)
TuTh 1:00-1:50
Perin, 357 Bartlett
Two lectures, one discussion per week. An introductory survey of some basic problems in philosophy. Readings will include texts by Plato, Descartes, Berkeley, Hume, and others. Requirements: participation in weekly discussion sections, several papers and/or exams.

100 C - Introduction to Philosophy (AL)
TuTh 1:00-2:15
Doviak
This course provides an introduction to some of the major themes in the Western philosophical tradition as well as methods for analyzing and evaluating philosophical arguments. We will focus primarily on four topics: the nature of knowledge, the mind/body problem, personal identity, and free will. Text: Elliott Sober, Core Questions in Philosophy: a Text with Readings.

100 D - Introduction to Philosophy (AL)
TuTh 1:00-2:15
Kristen Hine, 379 Bartlett
This introductory course will be divided into three sections: Plato; arguments for the existence of God; the problem of personal identity. In each section there will be an emphasis on precise formulation of views and logical argumentation. Course requirements: several quizzes and three exams. Texts: Plato , Apology, Crito, and Meno; John Perry, A Dialogue on Personal Identity and Immortality; John Perry; Dialogue on Good, Evil, and the Existence of God.

100 E - Introduction to Philosophy (AL)
TuTh 1:00-2:15
Brandt van der Gaast
Description forthcoming.

100H - Introduction to Philosophy (Honors) (AL)
MWF 11:15-12:05
Ty Barnes
This course provides an introduction to philosophy by way of a discussion of four central philosophical problems - the problem of free will and determinism; the problem of the nature of knowledge, the "mind-body" problem (including puzzles about personal identity); and the problem of the existence and nature of God.  In each case, the focus is on careful formulation of doctrines and arguments.  The goals are (i) to understand the doctrines and arguments; (ii) to develop the ability to evaluate the doctrines and arguments; and (iii) to begin to develop the ability to extract well-formulated, interesting arguments from philosophical texts including: Descartes, Meditations on First Philosophy; Plato, Theaetetus and Phaedo; Perry, A Dialogue on Personal Identity and Immortality; Course Packet. Requirements: 3 Exams, quizzes, a short term paper, and a presentation

110 - Introduction to Logic (R2)
MWF 12:20
Kornblith
This course offers an introduction to sentential and predicate logic. Techniques for translating English into formal languages will be developed, as well as proof techniques within the formal languages. Requirements: In-class exams and a final exam.  Text: Hardegree, Symbolic Logic: A First Course, 3rd edition.

160 A - Introduction to Ethics (AT)
MWF 11:15
Feldman
Two lectures, one discussion per week. Consideration of some of the most important theories about right and wrong, good and evil, and virtue and vice. In each case, one focus will be on clear and accurate formulation of the theory. Another focus will be on understanding and evaluating classic objections to the theory. Readings from Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Bentham, Mill, Kant, Ross, Moore, and others. Text: Feldman, Introduction to Ethics. Requirements: three quizzes; no papers, no final exam. Each student will be permitted to take one quiz over again at the end of the semester.

160 B - Introduction to Ethics
TuTh 1:00-2:15
Justin Klockseim
This class provides an introduction to ethics by way of a discussion of doctrines and arguments in two central areas of  moral philosophy -- (a) the normative ethics of behavior (the  theory of right and wrong action) and (b) value theory (the theory  of good and evil). Along the way, other important topics in moral philosophy will be discussed. In each case, the focus is on careful formulation of doctrines and arguments.  The goals are (i) to understand the doctrines and arguments; (ii) to develop the ability to evaluate the doctrines and arguments; and (iii) to begin to develop the ability to extract well-formulated, interesting arguments from philosophical texts.

160 C - Introduction to Ethics
TuTh 1-2:15
Andrew Platt, Bartlett 351
Start thinking critically about ethics, and start understanding the ethical theories that influence the modern world.  In this course, we’ll do some philosophy, and learn about philosophy, by discussing the core concepts of ethics – rightness, goodness, duty and virtue.  We’ll approach these topics from a historical perspective, studying texts by Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Kant, Mill and Ross, with additional readings by contemporary thinkers.  Our study of the ethical theories in these works will be supplemented with discussions of how they can be applied to concrete cases – particularly cases in biomedical and business ethics.  Introduction to Ethics (edited by Fred Feldman) is the only required text. Requirements: a weekly, short writing assignment; homework assignments; four exams.

160 H - Introduction to Ethics (Honors)
MWF 1:25-2:15
Ty Barnes
What makes an act right?  What makes someone's life good?  What is virtue?  These are some of the questions that we'll consider this semester.  This course provides an introduction to ethics by way of a discussion of doctrines and arguments in three central areas of moral philosophy--(a) the normative ethics of behavior (the theory of right and wrong action), (b) value theory (the theory of good and evil), and (c) virtue/vice theory (the theory of excellence of character).  Our focus will be on (i) careful study of the relevant texts and (ii) clear and precise formulation and evaluation of the most important theories and arguments. Text: Introduction to Ethics (anthology edited by Fred Feldman); Course Packet. Requirements: 3 Exams, quizzes, a short term paper, and a presentation.

164, Lecture 1 - Medical Ethics (AT)
MWF 10:10-11:00
Jason Raibley
The practice of medical and biological science raises certain distinctive ethical issues. There are issues concerning abortion, euthanasia, human and animal experimentation, patient autonomy, human cloning, resource allocation, organ donation, patient confidentiality, truth-telling, and more. The purpose of this course is to understand and appreciate the moral questions raised by some of these topics and to consider and critically evaluate some prominent positions and arguments concerning them. Throughout the semester, we will read and discuss reports of real-life cases, as well as several influential essays on these topics, and we will try to assess whether, and to what extent, the application of any overarching ethical principle can guide us in making real-life ethical decisions.

164, Lecture 2 - Medical Ethics (AT)
TuTh 9:30-10:45
Michael Rubin
This course provides an introduction to applied ethics through issues of medicine and health care. Topics include abortion, cloning, euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, medical experimentation on humans and animals, and the allocation of scarce medical resources.

164, Lecture 3 - Medical Ethics (AT)
TuTh 9:30-10:45
Uri Leibowitz
The practice of medical and biological science raises certain distinctive ethical issues. There are issues concerning abortion, euthanasia, human and animal experimentation, patient autonomy, human cloning, resource allocation, organ donation, patient confidentiality, truth-telling, and more. The purpose of this course is to understand and appreciate the moral questions raised by some of these topics and to consider and critically evaluate some prominent positions and arguments concerning them. Throughout the semester, we will read and discuss reports of real-life cases, as well as several influential essays on these topics, and we will try to assess whether, and to what extent, the application of any overarching ethical principle can guide us in making real-life ethical decisions.

161H - Problems in Social Thought (Honors)
TuTh 9:30-10:45
Ty Barnes
This course serves as an introduction to the history and philosophical foundations for some of the problems and their attempted solutions in classical Western political philosophy.  The course is divided into three sections.  In the first section we will examine contemporary game theory as a means to understanding the classical conception of the need for, and proper role of, government.  In the second section we will examine the origin of classical Western liberalism in Hobbes and Locke.  Finally, in the third section, we will focus on various conceptions of justice, contemplating upon which conception of justice should be used in assessing the values of political systems.  If time permits, we will, somewhere along the way, survey some of the historical justifications for revolutions and rebellions against the state. Text: Course Packet. Requirements: 3 Exams, quizzes, a short term paper, and a presentation

310 - Intermediate Logic
TuTh, 9:30-10:45
Hardegree
Continuation of Philosophy 110.  Three logical systems are examined: (1) Function Logic, (2) Identity Logic, (3) Description Logic.  Work is equally divided between translating English sentences into symbolic notation, and constructing formal derivations.  Requirements: seven exams.  Prerequisite: Philosophy 110, or consent of the instructor.
Web Site: http://www-unix.oit.umass.edu/~gmhwww/310/index.htm

321 - History of Modern Philosophy (HS)
TuTh 1:00-2:15
Brad Chynoweth
This course will be a survey of 17 th and 18 th century philosophy. We will carefully and critically read Descartes’ Meditations, Leibniz’s Discourse on Metaphysics, portions of Locke’s Essay Concerning Human Understanding, and Hume’s Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding. The goals of the course will be to understand and evaluate the central arguments in these texts as well as trace the development of certain controversial topics of particular interest to early modern philosophers. Among these topics will be the existence of innate ideas, the limits of knowledge, skepticism, the mind-body problem, and free will.
Note: This course, when taken in conjunction with Philosophy 398W, satisfies the Junior Year Writing Requirement for Philosophy Majors.

329 - Medieval Philosophy
TuTh 11:15-12:30
Matthews
Survey of medieval philosophy, focusing on such puzzling questions as (1) Is human freedom compatible with God’s foreknowledge of all that will ever happen? (2) Are there good arguments for the existence of God? (3) Is the idea of an omnipotent being coherent? (3) Could morality be adequately based on the mere fact that God wants us to do something, rather than on the reason God has for wanting us to do it? (4) Can there be a thing that is a universal thing? Text: Hyman and Walsh (eds.), Philosophy in the Middle Ages Mid-term exam, term paper, and take-home final exam. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy, or consent of the instructor.

330 - Continental Rationalism
TuTh 1:00-2:15
Marcy Lascano
This course will be a critical study of selected works in metaphysics, epistemology, philosophical theology, and philosophy of science by17th-century rationalists on the continent. We will focus on the works of Descartes, Spinoza, Malebranche, and Leibniz. Requirements: several short papers and class presentations. Prerequisites: one course in philosophy.

334 - American Philosophy
MWF 12:20-1:10
Brian Kiniry
This course is a survey of American Pragmatism and its influences on 19th and 20th century philosophy in the United States. We will begin our survey with a careful reading of essays by the founders of Pragmatism, Charles Sanders Pierce, William James, and John Dewey. Next, we will read a number of classic essays by C. I. Lewis, Wilfrid Sellars, and W. V. O. Quine, all of which exhibit strong Pragmatic influences. We will conclude with an examination of Neo-Pragmatism as espoused in a couple of recent papers by Hillary Putnam and Richard Rorty.

335 - Contemporary Analytic Philosophy
MWF 11:15-12-05
Jacob Bridge
A survey of some of the most important works and themes of 20th century analytic philosophy. We will be reading books by Bertrand Russell, A.J. Ayer, Ludwig Wittgenstein, and Saul Kripke. Themes include the logical structure of the world, meaning, and the nature of analytic truth and a priori knowledge. Requirements: several short papers and one longer term paper.

383 - Philosophical Approaches to Religion
MWF 1:25-2:15
Stephan Torre
The first section of the course will be devoted to arguments for and against the existence of God.  We will examine the cosmological argument, the teleological argument, the ontological argument and the problem of evil. The second section will concern the divine attributes: omnipotence, omniscience, and God's temporality.  In the third section we will consider the role of evidence in religious belief and the rationality of belief in God.

394D - Seminar: Death
W 3:35-6:00
Chris Heathwood
Epicurus claimed that it is irrational to fear death, since death does not harm the living (it does not touch them while they live), and it does not harm the dead (nothing can harm them, since they no longer exist).  This argument gives rise to many questions about the nature and value of death.  One of the most prominent is, What is death?  Another concerns the possibility of surviving death: What must human persons be like if "life after death" is to be possible?  The central questions about the value of death are, Is death an evil?, and, If so, how?  How is it possible for death to harm someone if he or she doesn't exist when dead?  Other evaluative questions that we may study concern the rationality of the fear of death, the asymmetry in our attitudes about postmortem and prenatal nonexistence, the desirability of immortality, and the morality of killing.
Texts (these are tentative): Feldman, Confrontations with the Reaper; Fischer, The Metaphysics of Death; Perry, A Dialogue on Personal Identity and Immortality; plus a course packet.
Requirements: two to three short papers; one term paper.

394M - Seminar - Metaphysics
Tu 4:00-6:30
Schaffer
Metaphysics, according to Aristotle, is the study of being qua being. We will investigate the structure of being, focusing on questions concerning properties, possibilities, and persistence. For instance, we will consider what aspect of reality grounds truths about what is and is not possible. Prerequisite: at least two courses in philosophy.

398W - Junior Year Writing Course
Chappell
One-credit practicum: must be taken in conjunction with PHIL 321. Satisfies the Junior Year Writing Requirement in Philosophy. Weekly discussion sections. Text: Strunk & White, The Elements of Style. Requirments: several short papers, some of which must be rewritten in the light of the insturctor's comments. Pass/Fail only. Prerequisite: English 112 or the equivalent, and Junior class status

513 - Mathematical Logic I
MWF 12:20
Klement
Elementary meta-mathematics and logical meta-theory. Topics include completness and consistency proofs for first-order logic, model theory, elementary number theory (especially Peano arithmetic), and Gödel's incompleteness theorems and related results. Text: Mendelson, Introduction to Mathematical Logic, 4th ed. Requirements: problem sets and exams. Prerequisite: Philosophy 310, or consent of instructor.

594K - Seminar - Knowledge of Self and Other Minds
M 3:35-6:00
Kornblith
We seem to have a great deal of knowledge about our own mental states and about the mental states of other people.  From a Cartesian perspective, knowledge of our current mental states is entirely unproblematic, while knowledge of the mental states of others (and, of course, knowledge of the external world) cry out for explanation.  But how is self-knowledge possible, and how, if at all, does it differ from knowledge of the mental states of others and of the physical world?  We will examine a variety of views on these matters in both the philosophical and the psychological literature.  We will read Shaun Nichols and Stephen Stich's book Mindreading, as well as a selection of material by a variety of other authors.

594M - Seminar - Mind and Meaning
Tu 7:30-10:00
Jay Garfield
This seminar will be an exploration of the philosophy of Wilfrid Sellars. We will focus on his epistemology and philosophy of mind.  After considering Sellars' approach to the Kantian problematic and the context this sets for his own work, we will turn to his account of meaning.  The center of the course will be a close reading of Sellars' influential essay "Empiricism and the Philosophy of Mind."  Following this we will read some his later essays on the philosophy of mind, meaning and epistemology.  We will consider the many dimensions of Sellars' influence on 20th and 21st Century philosophy of mind, epistemology and philosophy of language. Syllabus.

594S - Formal Semantics
time and place by arrangement
Hardegree
We usually understand novel sentences – e.g., this one – with little or no hesitation. How do we accomplish this? According to the received opinion, our linguistic knowledge divides into two modules – roughly, words and rules – which in turn correspond respectively to Lexical Grammar and Compositional Grammar. The present course concerns Compositional Semantics – the study of how the meanings of compound expressions are derived from the meanings of their parts. We pursue this enterprise within the framework of Categorial Grammar – more specifically, within the framework of Type-Logical Grammar. Topics will include: set theory, type theory, lambda-calculus, categorial syntax and semantics, type-logical syntax and semantics. Prerequisite: graduate status, or consent of the instructor. Requirements: homework assignments.
Web Site: http://www-unix.oit.umass.edu/~gmhwww/595/index.htm