100 - Introduction to Philosophy
TuTh 1:00-2:15
Casey Perin, 357 Bartlett
Two lectures, one discussion per week. An introductory survey of some basic problems in philosophy. Readings will include texts by Plato, Descartes, Berkeley, Hume, and others. Requirements: participation in weekly discussion sections, several papers and/or exams.

100 - Introduction to Philosophy
MW 2:30-3:20
Jonathan Schaffer, 359 Bartlett
In this course we will discuss philosophical issues that are historically important in the development of the Western philosophical tradition, and that continue to be important in the ongoing conversation of contemporary philosophy. These topics include: the nature and extent of human knowledge, the existence of god and the status of religious belief, the relationship between mind and body, and the nature and extent of human freedom. No prerequisites.

100 - Introduction to Philosophy
TuTh 1:00-2:15
Btrfld 7 (Residential College)
TBA

100 - Introduction to Philosophy
TuTh 1:00-2:15
TBA

100H - Introduction to Philosophy (Honors)
TuTh 2:30-3:45
Jean-Paul Vessel, Bartlett 361
This course provides an introduction to philosophy by way of a discussion of four central philosophical problems - the problem of free will and determinism; the problem of the nature of knowledge, the "mind-body" problem (including puzzles about personal identity); and the problem of the existence and nature of God.  In each case, the focus is on careful formulation of doctrines and arguments.  The goals are (i) to understand the doctrines and arguments; (ii) to develop the ability to evaluate the doctrines and arguments; and (iii) to begin to develop the ability to extract well-formulated, interesting arguments from philosophical texts including: Descartes, Meditations on First Philosophy; Plato, Theaetetus and Phaedo; Perry, A Dialogue on Personal Identity and Immortality; Course Packet. Requirements: 3 Exams, quizzes, a short term paper, and a presentation

110 - Introduction to Logic
MWF 12:20
Hilary Kornblith, 360 Bartlett
This course offers an introduction to sentential and predicate logic. Techniques for translating English into formal languages will be developed, as well as proof techniques within the formal languages. Requirements: In-class exams and a final exam.  Text: Hardegree, Symbolic Logic: A First Course, 3rd edition.

160 - Introduction to Ethics
MW 11:15
Fred Feldman, Bartlett 362
Two lectures, one discussion per week. Consideration of some of the most important theories about right and wrong, good and evil, and virtue and vice. In each case, one focus will be on clear and accurate formulation of the theory. Another focus will be on understanding and evaluating classic objections to the theory. Readings from Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Bentham, Mill, Kant, Ross, Moore, and others. Text: Feldman, Introduction to Ethics. Requirements: three quizzes; no papers, no final exam. Each student will be permitted to take one quiz over again at the end of the semester.

160 - Introduction To Ethics
TuTh 1:00-2:15
Grayson 104 (Residential College)
This course provides an introduction to three areas in moral philosophy: the normative ethics of behavior (theories about right and wrong actions), value theory (theories about good and evil), and applied ethics. Throughout the course of the semester students will become acquainted with some commonly discussed theories in ethics and will discuss various criticisms of these theories. There will be an emphasis on precise formulations of these theories and careful argumentation against them. In the last section of the course we will debate about moral questions that arise in the healthcare industry. Texts: Introduction to Ethics, ed. Fred Feldman; course packet. Requirements: three take-home exams and weekly quizzes.

160H - Introduction to Ethics (Honors)
MW 1:25-2:15
Jean-Paul Vessel, Bartlett 361
What makes an act right?  What makes someone's life good?  What is virtue?  These are some of the questions that we'll consider this semester.  This course provides an introduction to ethics by way of a discussion of doctrines and arguments in three central areas of moral philosophy--(a) the normative ethics of behavior (the theory of right and wrong action), (b) value theory (the theory of good and evil), and (c) virtue/vice theory (the theory of excellence of character).  Our focus will be on (i) careful study of the relevant texts and (ii) clear and precise formulation and evaluation of the most important theories and arguments. Text: Introduction to Ethics (anthology edited by Fred Feldman); Course Packet. Requirements: 3 Exams, quizzes, a short term paper, and a presentation.

161 - Problems in Social Thought
TuTh 11:15-12:30
Ann Ferguson
A survey of theories of the ideal relation between citizens and states, particularly focusing on theories of democracy, citizenship, and gender, and on problems of globalization.  We will consider classic defenses and critiques of the state (ancient, liberal, Marxist, anarchist) and views of civil disobedience.  Some contemporary feminist and critical race theories of the state and its relation to the family, civil society, and the emerging global economy will also be covered.  Texts: Somerville and Santoni (eds), Social and Political Philosophy; Lummis, Radical Democracy;  a xeroxed collection of readings.  Requirements: class participation, 3 short thought papers, a mid-term take-home exam, and a 5-8 page term paper.

164 - Medical Ethics
MWF 10:10
Chris Heathwood, Bartlett 361
The practice of medical and biological science raises certain distinctive ethical issues.  There are issues concerning abortion, euthanasia, human cloning, human and animal experimentation, resource allocation, organ donation, patient confidentiality, truth-telling, patient autonomy, and more.  The purpose of this course is to understand and appreciate the moral questions raised by some of these issues and to consider and critically evaluate some prominent positions and arguments concerning them.

161H - Problems in Social Thought (Honors)
TuTh 1:00-2:15
Jean-Paul Vessel, Bartlett 361
This course serves as an introduction to the history and philosophical foundations for some of the problems and their attempted solutions in classical Western political philosophy.  The course is divided into three sections.  In the first section we will examine contemporary game theory as a means to understanding the classical conception of the need for, and proper role of, government.  In the second section we will examine the origin of classical Western liberalism in Hobbes and Locke.  Finally, in the third section, we will focus on various conceptions of justice, contemplating upon which conception of justice should be used in assessing the values of political systems.  If time permits, we will, somewhere along the way, survey some of the historical justifications for revolutions and rebellions against the state. Text: Course Packet. Requirements: 3 Exams, quizzes, a short term paper, and a presentation

164 - Medical Ethics
TuTh 9:30-10:15
Marcy Lascano
The practice of medical and biological science raises certain distinctive ethical issues. There are issues concerning abortion, euthanasia, human cloning, human and animal experimentation, resource allocation, organ donation, patient confidentiality, patient autonomy, and more. The purpose of this course is to understand and appreciate the moral questions raised by some of these issues and to consider and critically evaluate some prominent positions and arguments concerning them. There will be several take-home exams and in class writing assignments.

164 - Medical Ethics
TuTh 9:30-10:15
Moore 108 (Residential College)
Jason Raibley
The practice of medical and biological science raises certain distinctive ethical issues. There are issues concerning abortion, euthanasia, human cloning, human and animal experimentation, resource allocation, organ donation, patient confidentiality, patient autonomy, and more. The purpose of this course is to understand and appreciate the moral questions raised by some of these issues and to consider and critically evaluate some prominent positions and arguments concerning them. There will be several take-home exams and in class writing assignments.

310 - Intermediate Logic
TuTh9:30-10:45
Gary Hardegree, 363 Bartlett
Continuation of Philosophy 110.  Three logical systems are examined: (1) Function Logic, (2) Identity Logic, (3) Description Logic.  Work is equally divided between translating English sentences into symbolic notation, and constructing formal derivations.  Requirements: seven exams.  Prerequisite: Philosophy 110, or consent of the instructor.
Web Site: http://www-unix.oit.umass.edu/~gmhwww/310/index.htm 

321 - The History of Modern Philosophy
TuTh 1:00-2:15
Eileen O'Neill,364 Bartlett Hall
A survey of important contributions to philosophy in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Texts will include Gournay's The Equality of Men and Women, selections from Descartes' Principles of Philosophy, selections from Malebranche's Search After Truth, Berkeley's Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous, selections from Hume's Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding, and (time permitting) selections from Kant's Prolegomena to Any Future Metaphysics. There will also be a small course packet containing additional primary source material. Discussions will focus on the topics of: skepticism, causation, mind-body problems, the nature of body, and a priori knowledge. Prerequisites: one course in philosophy. Requirements: several exams and quizzes, as well as a weekly writing assignment.

331 - British Empiricism
TuTh 1:00-2:15
Vere Chappell, Bartlett 380
Lecture and discussion. Close study of major works by Locke, Berkeley, and Hume. Class discussion will emphasize topics in epistemology, metaphysics, and moral psychology. Texts: Locke, Essay concerning Human Understanding, ed. Winkler; Berkeley, Treatise concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge, ed. Dancy; Hume, Enquiry concerning Human Understanding, ed. Beuachamp. Class attendance and participation, several quizzes and exams, final paper. Prerequisite: at least one course in philosophy.

332 - Kant's Critique of Pure Reason
TuTh 11:15-12:30
Kris McDaniel  Bartlett 382
In this course, we will focus on Kant's most famous work, Critique of Pure Reason.  In the Critique, Kant presents and defends interesting views about the nature of a priori and empirical knowledge, causation, cognition, knowledge of God and the soul, material objects, and space and time.  We will carefully read the Critique, extract arguments from the text, and then evaluate them. Text: Kant, Critique of Pure Reason (translated by Guyer and Wood); James van Cleve, Problems from Kant; articles in the library reserve room Course requirements: various pop-quizzes  (20% of the grade); short 1-2 page papers (40% of the grade); Take Home Final (40% of the grade). Prerequisites: two philosophy classes or permission of the instructor.

336 - Existential Phil
MWF 12:20
Michael Rubin
An examination of the main themes of Existentialism through a careful reading of selections from Kierkegaard's Fear and Trembling, Nietzsche's The Gay Science, Heidegger's Being and Time, and Sartre's Being and Nothingness. Topics will include the teleological suspension of the ethical, knowledge and morality after the death of God, authenticity, existence, the life world, intersubjectivity, and freedom. Text: Existentialism Basic Writings, edited by Charles Guignon and Derk Pereboom. Course requirements include 2 papers and in-class quizzes.

392M - The History of Metaphysics: Substance and Causation in the Seventeenth Century
Thu 3:35-18:00
Eileen O'Neill, 364 Bartlett Hall
The focus of this seminar is the metaphysics that underlies seventeenth-century explanations of a range of natural phenomena, including bodily motion, sense perception, and non-sensory thought. We will examine various early modern responses to the questions: Is body able to cause sense experience in a mind?; Are bodies capable of causing motion in other bodies?; Is the production of sense experience explainable by the science of mechanism?; Can matter think all by itself?; "Is God the sole cause of our sensations?" The metaphysical views about substance and causation that we will study include the dualistic interactionism of Descartes and Astell, the qualified dualistic interactionism of Locke and More, the occasionalist dualism of Malebranche and Norris, and the vitalist monisms of Conway and Cavendish. Texts include The Philosophical Writings of Descartes, Volumes I and II (Cambridge); Nicolas Malebranche: Philosophical Selections (Hackett); Anne Conway, The Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy (Cambridge), Margaret Cavendish, Observations upon Experimental Philosophy, as well as a course packet with photocopies of selections from Descartes' correspondence with Princess Elisabeth, Astell's Letters Concerning the Love of God and The Christian Religion, Locke's Essay and correspondence with Stillingfleet, and Cavendish's Philosophical Letters. Prerequisites: one course in philosophy. Requirements: This class will be conducted as a seminar. This means that the instructor will not typically give a lecture; instead all seminar members will meet once a week for 2 1/2 hours to discuss the readings. Each student will be asked to do several seminar presentations, and several short papers - some on assigned topics. When presenting material to the seminar, students should make copies for all class members of a handout outlining the structure of the arguments to be discussed, and the main questions and problems that the material raises.

394P - Seminar: Personal Identity
Wed 3:35-6:00
Lynne Baker, Bartlett 366.
This seminar will focus on recent work on personal identity: under what conditions is a person in a primary-school picture the same person as you years later? We shall read contemporary articles by philosophers such as Bernard Williams, Robert Nozick, Derek Parfit, David Lewis, Ernest Sosa, Peter Unger, John Perry, Sydney Shoemaker and others. Texts: Personal Identity, a collection of essays edited by Raymond Martin and John Barresi (2003) and other recent articles. Course requirements: Short paper, term paper, class presentation(s).Prerequisites: At least 3 courses in philosophy or permission of the instructor.

550 - Theory of Knowledge
MWF 1:25-2:15
Hilary Kornblith, 360 Bartlett
Some beliefs are justified; others are not.  What is it that marks the difference?  What conditions must be satisfied if a belief is to be justified?  The available views about justification may be divided into two types: internalist and externalist.  Roughly, internalists believe that the conditions which must be satisfied for a belief to be justified are, in some sense, internal to the agent: for example, on one such view, they must be available to introspection.  Externalists disagree: the factors which make a belief justified need not be entirely internal.  We will examine this debate in detail.  Required texts: BonJour and Sosa, Epistemic Justification: Internalism vs. Externalism, Foundations vs. Virtues; Kornblith, ed., Epistemology: Internalism and Externalism.  Additional readings will be made available. Prerequisites: Three courses in philosophy or permission of instructor. Requirements: One short (5-7 page) paper and one longer (12-15 page) paper.

594C - Consciousness
Tue 4:00-6:30
Joe Moore (Amherst College)
We will start by discussing various consciousness-based obstacles to physicalism, including Jackson's "knowledge argument" and Levine's "explanatory gap" considerations. This will lead us to an investigation of recent attempts to understand consciousness in terms of higher-order thought, and, more generally, to regard the phenomenal, qualitative features of conscious experience as thoroughly representational. Along the way we will consider whether we should distinguish different notions of consciousness, whether there is a "unity" of conscious experience, and whether we should regard introspection as a perceptual faculty like vision? Requirements: one short paper, a final term paper, and presentations. Prerequisites: 3 courses in philosophy or consent of instructor.

594O - Ontological Commitment
TuTh 2:30-4:00
Phillip Bricker, Bartlett 356
Ontology is that part of metaphysics that asks what fundamental sorts of thing exist: do mathematical objects such as numbers exist? Intensional objects such as meanings? Fictional objects? Merely possible objects? In this course, we will examine various criteria of ontological commitment, criteria meant to establish what sorts of thing we do, or should, believe exists. Authors will probably include Quine, Putnam, Field, Dummett, and Wright. Requirements: about five short papers, a term paper, and a class presentation. Prerequisites: two previous philosophy courses or consent of instructor.

594S - Formal Semantics
by arrangement
Gary Hardegree, Bartlett 363
We usually understand novel sentences - e.g., this one - with little or no hesitation. How do we accomplish this? According to the received opinion, our linguistic knowledge divides into two modules - roughly, words and rules - which in turn correspond respectively to Lexical Grammar and Compositional Grammar. The present course concerns Compositional Semantics - the study of how the meanings of compound expressions are derived from the meanings of their parts. We pursue this enterprise within the framework of Categorial Grammar - more specifically, within the framework of Type-Logical Grammar. Topics will include: set theory, type theory, lambda-calculus, categorial syntax and semantics, type-logical syntax and semantics. Prerequisite: graduate status, or consent of the instructor. Requirements: homework assignments.
Web Site: http://www-unix.oit.umass.edu/~gmhwww/595/index.htm