# Title Instructor Time Gen
Ed
Philosophy
Major
old new
100A Intro to Philosophy Feldman MW 2:30 + disc AL

This course provides an introduction to philosophy by way of a discussion of three central philosophical problems – the problem of free will and determinism; the "mind-body problem"; and the problem of the existence and nature of God.  In each case, the focus is on careful formulation of doctrines and arguments.  The goals are (i) to understand the doctrines and arguments; (ii) to develop the ability to evaluate the doctrines and arguments; and (iii) to begin to develop the ability to extract interesting arguments from philosophical texts. There will be three regularly scheduled quizzes.  Each student will be permitted to take (or take over) one quiz during final exam week. There will also be three written homework assignments.  There is no term paper or final exam in this course.

100B

Intro to Philosophy

Graham

TuTh 9:30 + disc

AL
The goals of this course are two-fold: to develop and hone students' analytical skills and to look at a number of the central issues in philosophy. Crucial to doing and understanding philosophy is an ability to present, explain, and evaluate arguments; throughout the course we will refine these abilities. By way of an introduction to a number of core philosophical issues we will take an in-depth look at one of the greatest works of philosophy of all time, Descartes's Meditations on First Philosophy. In it we will encounter skeptical arguments, arguments for the existence of God, and an argument for mind-body dualism. We will grapple with these issues in addition to questions about free will and ethics.

100H

Honors Intro to Philosophy

O'Neill

TuTh 1:00-2:15

AL

This course will be a very general introduction to the discipline of philosophy.  I will introduce you to some core questions that philosophy tries to answer, and we will examine some of the more prominent historical attempts to answer these questions. After looking at some introductory material, the course will be divided into four units: Ethics, God and Religious Belief, and Theory of Knowledge.  If time permits, we may also examine some topics on the nature of mind.  This will be a reading- and writing-intensive course.  In addition to learning the content of certain philosophical views, we will also be learning a certain skill set.  We will be learning how to identify, appreciate, and evaluate arguments and lines of reasoning.  This is a four-credit course.

110

Intro to Logic

Hardegree

TuTh 1:00-2:15

R2 Logic Logic
Introduction to symbolic logic, including sentential and predicate logic. Focus on translating English statements into symbolic notation, and evaluation of arguments for validity using formal proof techniques. Text: Hardegree, Symbolic Logic: A First Course, 4th ed. Requirements: homework and exams. Prerequisites: none.

160

Intro to Ethics

Meacham

TuTh 4:00 + disc

AT Ethics Value
In the first half of the class we'll discuss some of the main theories that have been offered for evaluating what one ought and ought not to do, such as Ethical Relativism, Ethical Skepticism, the Divine Command theory, Utilitarianism, Kantianism, and the Social Contract Theory. In the second half of the class we'll turn to look at some controversial issues in ethics, with possible topics including animal  rights, euthanasia, abortion, infanticide, parental responsibilities,  neonatal circumcision and children's rights.

164A

Medical Ethics

tba MWF 11:15 AT Ethics Value
This class will provide a survey of some of the topics in medical ethics, with possible topics including cloning, distribution of medical resources, homosexuality, abortion, and animal experimentation.

164B

Medical Ethics

tba MWF 12:20 AT Ethics Value
This class will provide a survey of some of the topics in medical ethics, with possible topics including cloning, distribution of medical resources, homosexuality, abortion, and animal experimentation.

164C

Medical Ethics

tba MWF 9:05 AT Ethics Value
This class will provide a survey of some of the topics in medical ethics, with possible topics including cloning, distribution of medical resources, homosexuality, abortion, and animal experimentation.

164D

Medical Ethics

tba TuTh 1:00-2:15 AT Ethics Value
RAP COURSE.
This class will provide a survey of some of the topics in medical ethics, with possible topics including cloning, distribution of medical resources, homosexuality, abortion, and animal experimentation.

164E

Medical Ethics

tba TuTh 2:30-3:45 AT Ethics Value
RAP COURSE.
This course provides an introduction to philosophical reasoning and argumentation through issues in the ethics of medicine and healthcare.  Topics include abortion, euthanasia, advance directives and living wills, smoking bans, experimentation on humans and on animals, genetic engineering, and sex-selection.  Our focus will be on clear and careful formulation of the relevant doctrines and arguments.  The goals of the course are (i) to understand the doctrines and arguments; (ii) to develop the ability to evaluate the doctrines and arguments; and (iii) to begin to develop the ability to extract arguments from philosophical texts.

164F

Medical Ethics

tba TuTh 11:15-12:30 AT Ethics Value
RAP COURSE.
This class will provide a survey of some of the topics in medical ethics, with possible topics including cloning, distribution of medical resources, homosexuality, abortion, and animal experimentation.

164G

Medical Ethics

tba TBA AT Ethics Value
RAP COURSE.
This class will provide a survey of some of the topics in medical ethics, with possible topics including cloning, distribution of medical resources, homosexuality, abortion, and animal experimentation.

164H

Honors Medical Ethics

tba TuTh 11:15-12:30 AT Ethics Value
This class will provide a survey of some of the topics in medical ethics, with possible topics including cloning, distribution of medical resources, homosexuality, abortion, and animal experimentation.

164H

Honors Medical Ethics

tba TuTh 2:30-3:45 AT Ethics Value
This class will provide a survey of some of the topics in medical ethics, with possible topics including cloning, distribution of medical resources, homosexuality, abortion, and animal experimentation.

170

Problems in Social Thought

tba MWF 9:05 SB Value
This course is an introduction to modern Western political and social philosophy. We will focus on key works by Machiavelli, Locke, Rousseau, Mill, and Marx and on questions about the nature and limits of political power, rights, and liberty.

321

History of Modern Philosophy

Garcia

TuTh 2:30-3:45

HS Hist Hist(B)

This course offers an introductory survey of early modern philosophy.  We will discuss the scholastic background and the rise of the so-called new “mechanical philosophy”, focusing on such issues as skepticism, mind-body dualism, the existence of God, primary/secondary qualities, innate knowledge,  personal identity, causality, and a priori vs. a posteriori knowledge. Thinkers to be discussed include Aquinas, Descartes, Bacon, Galileo, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant.

Course requirements: midterm exam, final exam, and term paper, as well as posts on Moodle. Required textbooks: Descartes’ Meditations, Objections and Replies, ed. by Ariew and Cress (Hackett Press, 2006), The Empiricists, ed. by Taylor (Anchor Press), and Kant’s Prolegomena to All Future Metaphysics (Hackett Press, 2002). Please purchase these editions, all of which are very affordable. 

[Note: When taken in conjunction with Philosophy 398W, this course satisfies the Junior Year Writing Requirement for Philosophy Majors.]

328

Plato and Aristotle

de Harven

TuTh 4:00-5:15

Hist Hist(A)
Plato and Aristotle are widely considered the founders of Western philosophy, and this course will explore how this is so—both how their inquiries set the agenda for the ensuing tradition, and how their answers remain live philosophical currency.  In particular, we will compare and contrast Plato and Aristotle on the topics of form and the problem of universals (metaphysics), knowledge and explanation (epistemology), soul and psychology, virtue, and happiness.  Works covered will include, for Plato:  Euthyphro, Meno, Phaedo, Parmenides, and Republic; and for Aristotle:  Physics, De Anima, Prior and Posterior Analytics, Nicomachean Ethics, and Politics.
335 20th Century Analytic Philosophy Klement MWF 1:25   Hist M&E
Consideration of the major trends in British and American philosophy in roughly the first half of the 20th century. Topics include philosophical analysis, logical atomism, logical positivism and "the linguistic turn" in philosophy. Texts: works by Russell, Wittgenstein, Ayer, Kripke and/or others. Requirements: Take-home essay exams, in-class quizzes. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy, or consent of instructor.

336

Existential Philosophy

tba MWF 9:05 AL Hist
An introduction to the main themes of Existentialism through seminal writing by Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Sartre.

336

Existential Philosophy

tba MWF 12:20 AL Hist
An introduction to the main themes of Existentialism through seminal writing by Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Sartre.

341

Intro to Metaphysics

Eddon TuTh 11:15-12:30 M&E

The focus of this class is material objects. Do they have parts? Can they overlap? How do they persist through time and change? We will also look at related questions about time, identity, and ontology.

342

Intro to Epistemology

tba MWF 11:15 M&E

In this course, we will attempt to answer two major questions: 1) Can we know anything with certainty? And 2) Without certainty, what does knowledge amount to? In response to the first question, we will consider varieties of Skepticism, or the idea that we cannot know anything. In response to the second, we will consider contemporary theories of knowledge and justified belief. Toward the end of the semester, we will address a few specific topics according to student interest. Potential additional topics include: A Priori Knowledge, Feminist Epistemology, Other Minds, Naturalized Epistemology, Perception, Self-Knowledge, Testimony, and Virtue Epistemology. Class requirements will include two short papers and one term paper.

353

Intro to Philosophy of Science

tba MWF 2:30 M&E
What is there?  This is the most basic of questions about our world, and both metaphysics and physics are attempts at an answer.  But the pictures of reality that come from these two disciplines are quite different in many ways, and, in some cases, even antagonistic to one another.  The dominant theme of this course will be the brokerage of a peace treaty between metaphysics and physics, but we will approach this issue by studying some of the most fascinating issues in the philosophy of physics.  We will study some of the disputes over the nature of spacetime, philosophical issues in quantum mechanics, and issues in the philosophy of cosmology.  We will ask questions about the shape and size of space, the number of actual universes, the strange behavior of fundamental particles, and more!
371 Philosophical Approaches to Gender Antony TuTh 9:30-10:45 SB,U

This course will offer systematic examination of a variety of philosophical issues raised by the existence of gender roles in human society: Is the existence or content of such roles determined by nature?  Are they inherently oppressive?  How does the category gender interact with other socially significant categories, like race, class, and sexual orientation?  What would gender equality look like?  How do differences among women complicate attempts to generalize about gender?  In the last part of the course, we will bring our theoretical insights to bear on some topical issue related to gender, chosen by the class, such as: Is affirmative action morally justifiable?  Should pornography be regulated?  Is abortion morally permissible?  Reading will be drawn from historical and contemporary sources.  Methods of analytical philosophy, particularly the construction and critical evaluation of arguments, will be emphasized throughout.

383

Intro to Philosophy of Religion

tba MWF 10:10 M&E
Consideration of issues that arise when one thinks philosophically about religion. These include the question of the nature of God, the question whether there is a God, the question of how, and whether, one might come to know about God, and the question whether religion and science are compatible. Requirements: two exams and a final paper.
 
391M Philosophy of Math Bricker TuTh 4:00-5:15 M&E

This course is a survey.  First we will look at traditional positions in the philosophy of mathematics:  logicism, formalism, and intuitionism.  Reading will include Frege, Russell, Hilbert, and Heyting.  Then we will look (informally) at Godel’s Incompleteness Theorems; and discuss their philosophical relevance.  Finally, we will look more closely at the practice of mathematics, using Lakatos’ book Proofs and Refutations.  Requirements:  Two short papers, a midterm, and a final.

398W Junior Year Writing Garcia by arrangement JYW
A 1-credit pass/fail course that must be taken in conjunction with Philosophy 321.
It satisfies the University Junior Year Writing Requirement.

500

Contemporary Problems

Baker

M 3:30-6:00

IE

INTEGRATIVE EXPERIENCE

Religion, Science, Naturalism. 

This course will explore the intersection of religion, science and naturalism, with Christianity as our example of religion.  We'll start with a brief intellectual history on religion and science, then turn to a book on whether a Darwinian can be a Christian, and finally read a new book (2011) by Alvin Plantinga, Where the Conflict Really Lies.  We'll assess the arguments sympathetically but critically. The aim is to get a handle on just what the issues are and ways that they may (or may not) be resolved.

512 Philosophy and Logic Klement MWF 11:15
 
541 Topics in Metaphysics Eddon Th 1:00-3:30 M&E

It is often taken for granted that there are certain distinctions among properties: intrinsic/extrinsic, qualitative/haecceitistic, categorical/dispositional, physical/mental, natural/non-natural, Humean/unHumean, moral/non-moral, etc.  These distinctions play an important role in many philosophical theses.  What is the status of these distinctions?  Can some of them be “reduced” to or “analyzed” in terms of others?   In this class we will look carefully at a few of these distinctions (guided by class interest).  Although different considerations arise in each case, our investigations will reveal some common themes.

542 Topics in Epistemology Kornblith Tu 1:00-3:30 M&E

This course will involve a close reading of Peter Carruthers’s new book, The Opacity of Mind: An Integrative Theory of Self-Knowledge.  Carruthers has an extraordinarily interesting view, and he presents a wide range of argument and evidence in its favor.  Following Carruthers, we will discuss a good deal of psychological evidence about the nature of introspection, as well as its significance for a wide range of issues in epistemology and philosophy of mind.

591A Topics in Ancient Philosophy de Harven W 3:30-6:00 Hist Hist(A)
What motivates action?  Can we ever act against what we judge to be best?  If error is always a case of ignorance, how can people be held responsible for their actions?  We will explore answers to this and other paradoxes, the unity of the virtues and the counterintuitive thesis that it’s better to suffer than to do harm, which are at the heart of Socratic intellectualism.  Readings will include Plato’s dialogues Euthyphro, Laches, Apology, Crito, Protagoras, Euthydemus, Gorgias, and Republic; as well as Aristotle’s treatment of these Socratic themes in Nicomachean Ethics and, finally, the Stoics’ renewal of the Socratic commitment to virtue as sufficient for happiness.  In addition to the original ancient texts we will read some secondary literature; and, as a contrast to the intellectualist position, we will consider Plato, David Hume and Bernard Williams. 
592A Philosophy of Action Garcia TuTh 11:15-12:30

This course focuses on the nature of action and of rational agency.  In the first half of the course, we will discuss both defenders and critics of what is widely known as the “standard story of action”, viz., the Causal Theory of Action (CTA). According to CTA, actions are causally explained in part by the agent’s reasons understood in terms of various psychological and mental items, e.g., a desire for y, a belief that doing x will bring about y, some relevant intention, etc.  Various non-causalists argue that this approach leaves no room for the agent – as opposed to just mental or psychological states occurring within her – in the explanation of action. Some of the main topics include: the nature of intentional action, practical self-knowledge, the belief/desire model of motivation, wayward causal chains, practical reasoning, and weakness of will.  In the second half of the course, we will look at different accounts of rational agency, including recent constitutivist approaches (Korsgaard/Velleman/Raz) and group agency (Gilbert/Bratman)).

Some of the thinkers to be discussed include Aristotle, Anscombe, Davidson, Mele, Goldman, Audi, Smith, Ginet, Hornsby, von Wright, Schueler, Sehon, and Alvarez.  Required textbooks: Anscombe’s Intention and Davidson’s Essays on Actions and Events

595T Set Theory Hardegree TuTh 9:30-10:45
Elementary introduction to the theory of sets (specifically Zermelo-Fraenkel Set Theory). Sets, relations, functions, natural numbers, proof by induction, cardinal numbers. Comparison with other theories of plurality. Pre-requisite: Phil 310 (Intermediate Logic).