# Title Instructor Time Gen
Ed
Philosophy Major
old new
100 Intro to Philosophy Graham MW 2:30 + disc AL
The goals of this course are two-fold: to develop and hone students' analytical skills and to look at a number of the central issues in philosophy. Crucial to doing and understanding philosophy is an ability to present, explain, and evaluate arguments; throughout the course we will refine these abilities. By way of an introduction to a number of core philosophical issues we will take an in-depth look at one of the greatest works of philosophy of all time, Descartes's Meditations on First Philosophy. In it we will encounter skeptical arguments, arguments for the existence of God, and an argument for mind-body dualism. We will grapple with these issues in addition to questions about free will and ethics.
100 Intro to Philosophy Antony TuTh 9:30 + disc AL

An introduction to the methods and subject matter of philosophy, through detailed examination of several important philosophical issues: personal identity and the possibility of immortality, the rationality of belief in God, and the nature of ethical obligation.  Readings will be drawn from historical and contemporary sources.

100H Honors Intro to Philosophy O'Neill TuTh 1:00 AL
This course provides a historical introduction to Western philosophy through the interpretation of early modern (16th-18th centuries) texts by canonical male, and recently rediscovered female, philosophers. Students are expected to utilize the reasoning skills that they acquire at the beginning of the course in their critical evaluations of these arguments.  For example, we will use our knowledge of valid argument forms to reconstruct some 17th-century arguments for the view that women ought to be educated (Schurman). Students will have ample opportunity to demonstrate their mastery of textual interpretation and argument analysis in the weekly at-home writing assignment, the take-home essay questions, quizzes and essay exams. The wide-ranging themes of the course have an underlying sub-theme: sceptical arguments.  For example, we will examine sceptical challenges to: the theses that "might makes right" and that "women are by nature intellectually inferior to men" (Gournay), our belief that the senses are a reliable guide to the truth (Descartes), and our belief that our inductive practices are rationally justifiable (Hume).  Given the importance and breadth of the texts and topics covered, the stress on critical evaluation of arguments, and the focus on written and verbal expression, this course meets the objectives of the General Education (Arts and Literature) curriculum. This is a 4-credit course.
110 Intro to Logic Hardegree TuTh 1:00 R2 Logic Logic
Introduction to symbolic logic, including sentential and predicate logic. Focus on translating English statements into symbolic notation, and evaluation of arguments for validity using formal proof techniques. Text: Hardegree, Symbolic Logic: A First Course, 3rd ed. Requirements: homework and exams. Prerequisites: none.
160A Intro to Ethics Meacham TuTh 4:00 + disc AT Ethics Value
In the first half of the class we'll discuss some of the main theories that have been offered for evaluating what one ought and ought not to do, such as Ethical Relativism, Ethical Skepticism, the Divine Command theory, Utilitarianism, Kantianism, and the Social Contract Theory. In the second half of the class we'll turn to look at some controversial issues in ethics, with possible topics including animal  rights, euthanasia, abortion, infanticide, parental responsibilities,  neonatal circumcision and children's rights.
160B Intro to Ethics   TuTh 9:30-10:45 AT Ethics Value

Open to RAP students only.

In the first half of the class we'll discuss some of the main theories that have been offered for evaluating what one ought and ought not to do, such as Ethical Relativism, Ethical Skepticism, the Divine Command theory, Utilitarianism, Kantianism, and the Social Contract Theory. In the second half of the class we'll turn to look at some controversial issues in ethics, with possible topics including animal  rights, euthanasia, abortion, infanticide, parental responsibilities,  neonatal circumcision and children's rights.

164a Medical Ethics Darin Harootunian MWF 11:15 AT Ethics Value
An introduction to ethics through issues of medicine and health care. Topics include abortion,  treatment of impaired infants, euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, truth-telling, medical experimentation on human beings and on animals, and the allocation of scarce medical resources.  (Gen.Ed. AT)
164b Medical Ethics Heidi Buetow MWF 12:20 AT Ethics Value
An introduction to ethics through issues of medicine and health care. Topics include abortion,  treatment of impaired infants, euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, truth-telling, medical experimentation on human beings and on animals, and the allocation of scarce medical resources.
164c Medical Ethics Miles Tucker TuTh 9:30-10:45 AT Ethics Value

Open to RAP students only.

An introduction to ethics through issues of medicine and health care. Topics include abortion,  treatment of impaired infants, euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, truth-telling, medical experimentation on human beings and on animals, and the allocation of scarce medical resources.

164d Medical Ethics James Patten TuTh 1:00-2:15 AT Ethics Value
Open to RAP students only.
An introduction to ethics through issues of medicine and health care. Topics include abortion,  treatment of impaired infants, euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, truth-telling, medical experimentation on human beings and on animals, and the allocation of scarce medical resources.
164e Medical Ethics Jesse Fitts TuTh 2:30-3:45 AT Ethics Value

Open to RAP students only.

An introduction to ethics through issues of medicine and health care. Topics include abortion,  treatment of impaired infants, euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, truth-telling, medical experimentation on human beings and on animals, and the allocation of scarce medical resources.

164f Medical Ethics Joshua Moulton TuTh 9:30-10:45 AT Ethics Value

Open to RAP students only.

An introduction to ethics through issues of medicine and health care. Topics include abortion,  treatment of impaired infants, euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, truth-telling, medical experimentation on human beings and on animals, and the allocation of scarce medical resources.

164g Medical Ethics James Johnson TuTh 8:00-9:15 AT Ethics Value
An introduction to ethics through issues of medicine and health care. Topics include abortion,  treatment of impaired infants, euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, truth-telling, medical experimentation on human beings and on animals, and the allocation of scarce medical resources.
164 H Honors Medical Ethics James Binkoski TuTh 2:30-3:45 AT Ethics Value
This class will provide a survey of some of the topics in medical ethics, with possible topics including cloning, distribution of medical resources, homosexuality, abortion, and animal experimentation.
164 H Honors Medical Ethics Casey Knight TuTh 11:15-12:30 AT Ethics Value
This class will provide a survey of some of the topics in medical ethics, with possible topics including cloning, distribution of medical resources, homosexuality, abortion, and animal experimentation.
170 Problems in Social Thought Brian Chase MWF 3:35-4:25 SB Value
This course is an introduction to modern Western political and social philosophy. We will focus on key works by Machiavelli, Locke, Rousseau, Mill, and Marx and on questions about the nature and limits of political power, rights, and liberty.
320 History of Ancient Philosophy Donovan Cox TuTh 1:00-2:15 HS Hist Hist(A)
This course is an introduction to the earliest Western philosophy, that is, the philosophy of ancient Greece. It will focus on the thought of the Presocratics, Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, and will include topics in metaphysics, ethics, philosophy of religion, and epistemology.
335 Contemporary Analytic Philosophy Klement MWF 2:30   Hist M&E
Consideration of the major trends in British and American philosophy in roughly the first half of the 20th century. Topics include philosophical analysis, logical atomism, logical positivism and "the linguistic turn" in philosophy. Texts: works by Russell, Wittgenstein, Ayer, Kripke and/or others. Requirements: Take-home essay exams, in-class quizzes. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy, or consent of instructor.
336.1 Existential Philosophy Brandy Burfield MWF 9:05 AL Hist
An introduction to the main themes of Existentialism through seminal writing by Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Sartre.
336.2 Existential Philosophy Jonathan Rosen MWF 12:20 AL Hist
An introduction to the main themes of Existentialism through seminal writing by Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Sartre.
341 Metaphysics Ed Ferrier MWF 1:25-2:15 M&E
A survey in analytic metaphysics with special emphasis on the following topics: (1) Identity and Change; (2) Necessity, Essence and Possible Worlds; (3) Causation and Conditionals; (4) Agents, Actions and Events; (5) Space and Time; (6) Universals and Particulars. Text: A Survey of Metaphysics by E. J. Lowe (2002: Oxford). Grade: class participation, homework, exams, final paper
342 Epistemology Matthew Gifford MWF 11:15 M&E
In this course, we will attempt to answer two major questions: 1) Can we know anything with certainty? And 2) Without certainty, what does knowledge amount to? In response to the first question, we will consider varieties of Skepticism, or the idea that we cannot know anything. In response to the second, we will consider contemporary theories of knowledge and justified belief. Toward the end of the semester, we will address a few specific topics according to student interest. Potential additional topics include: A Priori Knowledge, Feminist Epistemology, Other Minds, Naturalized Epistemology, Perception, Self-Knowledge, Testimony, and Virtue Epistemology. Class requirements will include two short papers and one term paper.
346 Philosophy of Language Levine TuTh 11:15-12:30   M&E
An introductory survey of traditional problems and theories in the philosophy of language, such as: what is meaning?  do proper names have meaning?  how do definite descriptions function?  what is the relation between thought and language?
353 Philosophy of Science Peter Marchetto MWF 1:25   M&E
An introduction to core topics in the philosophy of science.  The  first third of the course will focus on the logical empiricist  conception of science and some classic problems concerning the nature  of evidence and confirmation.  From there, we’ll turn to the views of  Karl Popper and Tom Kuhn, two thinkers who have had an enormous impact  on our understanding of how science works.  The final third of the  course will introduce the student to three big topics in the  philosophy of science: the nature of scientific explanation, the  status of theoretical entities (e.g., quarks and fields), and Bayesian  confirmation theory.
355 Philosophy of Mind Antony TuTh 4:00-5:15   M&E
Can mere matter think?  What is consciousness?  Can I exist without any body?  How can my intentions cause my body to move?  These are among the questions that constitute the “Mind-Body Problem;” this course will show you how philosophers have tried  solve it.  We’ll begin with a survey of the main theoretical frameworks philosophers have proposed for understanding the relation between mind and body: dualism, reductionism, behaviorism, and functionalism.   Then we’ll examine two or three more specific issues in some detail, drawing on work by contemporary philosophers.
383 Philosophy of Religion Benjamin Rancourt MWF 10:10   M&E
Consideration of issues that arise when one thinks philosophically about religion.  These include arguments for the existence of God, the need (or lack of need) for such arguments, the divine attributes, the problem of evil, the nature of religious experience, and the relation of religion to science.
391S Secularism and Religion Baker TuTh 2:30-3:45   Value

Secularism is both a social movement of “dechristianization” and an intellectual movement that judges religion by nonreligious standards (like science and history).  This course will focus on the intellectual movement:  What challenges do science and history present to religion?   Can orthodox theists and secularists make peace?

We’ll read Thomas Nagel’s “Secular Philosophy and the Religious Temperament,” Philip Kitcher’s Living With Darwin, John Polkinghorne’s Belief in God in an Age of Science, David Bentley Hart’s Atheist Delusions, John Dewey’s A Common Faith, and Philip Kitcher’s “Challenges for Secularism.”  Nagel, Kitcher and Dewey are secularists; Polkinghorne and Hart are Christians.

Prerequisites: Two or more philosophy courses or permission of the instructor.

Course requirements:  class attendance (mandatory), weekly short papers, term paper or take-home exam.

394T Philosophy of Time Bricker M 4:40-7:10   M&E
An examination of the classic problems and paradoxes of time, including Zeno’s paradoxes of time and motion, McTaggart’s argument for the unreality of time, theories explaining the passage of time and the direction of time, and the possibility of time travel.  The course will conclude with some puzzles about time in the theory of relativity.  Prerequisites.  Two previous philosophy courses; high school physics.
398W Junior Year Writing Donovan Cox by arrangement  
A 1-credit pass/fail course that must be taken in conjunction with Philosophy 320/321; it satisfies the University Junior Year Writing Requirement.
511 Modal Logic Hardegree TuTh 9:30-10:45   Logic Logic
This course is intended to follow Philosophy 310 (Intermediate Logic), and examines various modal logical systems including alethic modal logic, epistemic logic, deontic logic, tense logic, and the logic of propositional attitudes. Emphasis will be on quantification, identity, descriptions, scoped singular terms, and actuality. Text: Hardegree, Introduction to Modal Logic (available on-line). Prerequisite: Philosophy 310, or consent of the instructor. For more information, consult course website .
513 Math Logic 1 Klement MWF 11:15   Logic Logic
Elementary meta-mathematics and logical meta-theory. Topics include completeness and consistency proofs for first-order logic, model theory, elementary number theory (especially Peano arithmetic), and Gödel's incompleteness theorems and related results. Text: Mendelson, Introduction to Mathematical Logic, 4th ed. Requirements: problem sets and exams. Prerequisite: Philosophy 310, or consent of instructor.
541 Topics in Metaphysics Eddon W 4:40-7:10   M&E
In this course we will be reading Sider's forthcoming book, Writing the Book of the World.  Topics to be discussed will include various notions of fundamentality; methodology of metaphysics; the intertwined notions of dependence, truthmaking, reduction; as well as issues involving laws, reference magnetism, theories of time, etc.
563 Topics in Ethics Graham Tu 7:00-9:30   Ethics Value
In this course we will examine many of the factors moral theorists have thought to be relevant to the moral permissibility and impermissibility of behavior. Among the many questions we will discuss are the following: Are an action's consequences morally relevant to its permissibility? If so, in what ways are they relevant? Is there a moral prohibition against harming others, even in cases in which doing so would bring about the best outcome? If there is such a prohibition, what are its contours? In what ways is consent morally relevant, if at all, to the permissibility of a person's actions? To what extent are we morally obliged to help those in desperate need? Requirements: two take-home exams, no term paper. Prerequisite: two courses in philosophy.
591m Early Modern Philosophy O’Neill Th 4:00-6:30   Hist Hist(B)
Cartesianism and its Critics.
In this course, we will attempt to reconstruct some of Descartes? most central views in metaphysics, natural philosophy/physics, and philosophy of mind?-including the scope and limits of our knowledge in these areas.  We will attempt to reconstruct Descartes? views by reading both Descartes? own texts and letters, and those of his early modern sympathetic and adversarial critics, including Princess Elisabeth, Malebranche, Astell, Cavendish, Leibniz, Poullain de la Barre, and Lambert.
Among the doctrines that Descartes? early modern critics and sympathizers attributed to him are the following: (1) a metaphysics of substances (such as this mind, that portion of the material world, and God) and modes (such as this idea and that shape); (2) a dualism of finite mental and physical substances; (3) the ability of one finite substance or mode to cause (partially or fully) changes in the modes of another finite substance; and (4) the ability of God to create and sustain in existence all finite substances, as well as to play a causal role in the changes in the modes of finite substances.  We will see that those critics who sought to overturn Cartesianism, as well as some who sought to defend Descartes? views and to make them consistent, challenged at least one of the above doctrines.  Our aim will be to evaluate these challenges, and to see if these responses are well placed or if Descartes had resources to handle them.
In the final part of the course, we will examine the ways Descartes? metaphysics and philosophy of mind were used as the grounding for seventeenth-century social views.  Some of the issues at stake were: Who ought to receive formal education and who is fit for the pursuit of scientific knowledge (scientia)?