# Title Instructor Time Gen
Ed
Philosophy Major
old new
100a Intro to Philosophy Feldman MW 2:30
+disc
AL
This course provides an introduction to philosophy by way of a discussion of three central philosophical problems -- the problem of free will and determinism; the "mind-body problem"; and the problem of the existence and nature of God.  In each case, the focus is on careful formulation of doctrines and arguments.  The goals are (i) to understand the doctrines and arguments; (ii) to develop the ability to evaluate the doctrines and arguments; and (iii) to begin to develop the ability to extract interesting arguments from philosophical texts. There will be three regularly scheduled quizzes.  Each student will be permitted to take (or take over) one quiz during final exam week. There will also be three written homework assignments.  There is no term paper or final exam in this course.
100b Intro to Philosophy Levine TuTh 9:30-10:20
+disc
AL
An introduction to philosophy through a survey of fundamental philosophical problems, such as: the existence of God, the basis of morality, the mind-body problem, and the nature of knowledge.
100H Honors Intro to Philosophy O'Neill TuTh 1:00 AL
This course provides a historical introduction to Western philosophy through the interpretation of early modern (16th-18th centuries) texts by canonical male, and recently rediscovered female, philosophers. Historical and literary interpretation will be pressed in the service of providing the best reconstruction of the arguments in these works.  Students are expected to utilize the critical reasoning tools that they acquire at the beginning of the course in their evaluations of these arguments.  Students will have ample opportunity to demonstrate their mastery of textual interpretation and argument analysis in the weekly at-home writing assignment, the take-home essay, quizzes and essay exams. The wide-ranging themes of the course have an underlying sub-theme: sceptical arguments.  For example, we’ll examine sceptical challenges to: the theses that “might makes right” and that “women are by nature intellectually inferior to men” (Gournay), our belief that the senses reveal the true nature of body (Descartes), and our belief in the existence of mind-independent matter. (Berkeley).
110 Intro to Logic Hardegree TuTh 1:00 R2 Logic Logic
Introduction to Symbolic Logic. Two logical systems are examined: (1) Sentential Logic, (2) Predicate Logic. Work is equally divided between: (a) translating English sentences into symbolic notation, and (b) constructing formal derivations. Text: Hardegree, Symbolic Logic: A First Course, 3rd ed. Requirements: In-class exams. For more information, consult course website.
160
A
Intro to Ethics Graham TuTh 4:00-4:40
+disc
AT Ethics Value
Description forthcoming.
160
B*
Intro to Ethics James Patten TuTh 9:30 AT Ethics Value
*RAP course.
Description forthcoming.
160H Honors Intro to Ethics Scott Hill TuTh 2:30 AT Ethics Value
How ought I to act?  What kind of person should I be? What is the good life for human beings?  This course offers an introduction to some fundamental debates in ethics. In the first half of the course, we look at the three major ethical schools of thought defended by Aristotle, Kant, and Mill, and address broad themes related to cultural relativism, egoism, and the relationship between God and morality.  In the second half of the course, we look at several contemporary debates in applied ethics regarding affirmative action, abortion, animal rights, familial obligations, and world poverty.
161 Intro to Social Thought Brandy Burfield MWF 10:10 SB Value
Description forthcoming.
164
A
Medical Ethics Benjamin Rancourt MWF 11:15 AT Ethics Value
Description forthcoming.
164
B
Medical Ethics Kristian Olsen TuTh 1:00 AT Ethics Value
Description forthcoming.
164
C*
Medical Ethics Donovan Cox TuTh 9:30 AT Ethics Value
*RAP course.
Description forthcoming.
164
D*
Medical Ethics Edward Ferrier TuTh 1:00 AT Ethics Value
*RAP course.

We begin with a brief discussion of logical form and a survey of several major ethical views, including Utilitarianism, Social Contract Theory and Virtue Ethics. The bulk of the semester is dedicated to particular issues in the field of medicine. Among the topics we will discuss are: Paternalism/Autonomy; Abortion; Genetic Enhancement; Euthanasia; Distribution of Health Care. Grade: homework assignments and exams.

164
E*
Medical Ethics Jeremy Cushing TuTh 2:30 AT Ethics Value
*RAP course.
This class is a survey of topics in medical ethics. In this class students will learn to approach complicated material analytically and to express ideas clearly in writing. Topics of discussion will include abortion, euthanasia, and allocation of healthcare resources, among others.
164
F*
Medical Ethics Peter Marchetto TuTh 9:30 AT Ethics Value
*RAP course.
Description forthcoming.
164H Honors Medical Ethics Heidi Buetow TuTh 11:15 AT Ethics Value
Description forthcoming.
320 Ancient Philosophy Matthews TuTh 11:15 HS Hist Hist(A)

This course is an introduction to the earliest Western philosophy, that is, the philosophy of ancient Greece. It will focus on the thought of the Presocratics, Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, and will include topics in metaphysics, ethics, philosophy of religion, and epistemology.

TEXT: Readings in Ancient Greek Philosophy, S.M. Cohen, P. Curd, and C.D.C. Reeve, eds.,
3rd edition, Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing Co. ISBN 0-87220-769-2 paperback.

335 Analytic Philosophy Klement MWF 2:30   Hist M&E
Consideration of the major trends in British and American philosophy in roughly the first half of the 20th century. Topics include philosophical analysis, logical atomism, logical positivism and "the linguistic turn" in philosophy. Texts: works by Russell, Wittgenstein, Ayer, Kripke and/or others. Requirements: Take-home essay exams, in-class quizzes. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy, or consent of instructor.
336
01
Existential Philosophy Barak Krakauer MWF 12:20 AL Hist
Description forthcoming.
336
02
Existential Philosophy Rachel Robison MWF 9:05 AL Hist
Description forthcoming.
381 Philosophy of Women Antony TuTh 9:30 SBU Value
Philosophical Perspectives on Gender. This course will offer systematic examination of a variety of philosophical issues raised by the existence of gender roles in human society:  Is the existence or content of such roles determined by nature?   Are they inherently oppressive?  How does the category gender interact with other socially significant categories, like race, class, and sexual orientation?  What would gender equality look like?  How do differences among women complicate attempts to generalize about gender?
In the last part of the course, we will bring our theoretical insights to bear on some topical issue related to gender, chosen by the class, such as: is affirmative action morally justifiable?  Should pornography be regulated? Is abortion morally permissible? 
Readings will be drawn from historical and contemporary sources.  Methods of analytical philosophy, particularly the construction and critical evaluation of arguments, will be emphasized throughout.
382 Philosophy of Science James Binkoski MWF 1:25   M&E
An introduction to core topics in the philosophy of science.  The  first third of the course will focus on the logical empiricist  conception of science and some classic problems concerning the nature  of evidence and confirmation.  From there, we’ll turn to the views of  Karl Popper and Tom Kuhn, two thinkers who have had an enormous impact  on our understanding of how science works.  The final third of the  course will introduce the student to three big topics in the  philosophy of science: the nature of scientific explanation, the  status of theoretical entities (e.g., quarks and fields), and Bayesian  confirmation theory.
383 Philosophy of Religion Darin Harootunian MWF 10:10   M&E
Description forthcoming.
500 Contemporary Problems
(SENIOR-SEMINAR)
Baker TuTh 4:00   M&E
[This course is restricted to senior majors in philosophy.]

This senior seminar will read, write about and discuss recent articles concerning Personal Identity and the Self.  We will take up issues like these:  The Self (Galen Strawson), On Being Someone (Thomas Nagel, John Perry, Thomas Metzinger), Self-Knowledge (John Perry, David Velleman), The Importance of Personal Identity (Derek Parfit, Mark Johnston, Gareth B. Matthews), Personal Identity and Bodily Identity (Bernard Williams, John Perry), Animalism (Eric Olson, Lynne Baker).
Requirements:  Class attendance, class presentation, short weekly papers, capstone paper.

551 Metaphysics Eddon M 3:35-6:05   M&E
Description forthcoming.
584 Philosophy of Language Antony Tu 1:00-3:30   M&E
Description forthcoming.
586 Philosophy of Mathematics Klement MWF 12:20   M&E
Description forthcoming.
593M Philosophy of Mind Levine Th 1:00-3:30   M&E
An in-depth study of the philosophical issues surrounding mental representation and cognitive architecture through the work of Jerry Fodor.  Permission of instructor is required for undergraduates.
594T Theories of Autonomy Garcia TuTh 11:15   M&E
Autonomy is a key concept in moral and political philosophy.  This course offers an overview of autonomy from three different perspectives. First, we will look at the historical development of the idea (Rousseau/Kant). Second, we will discuss recent accounts of personal autonomy, especially ‘hierarchical’ analyses (Frankfurt/Dworkin) and their critics (Thalberg/Watson/Wolf/Bratman/Velleman) as well as philosophical accounts of the failure of personal autonomy in terms of addiction (Elster/Wallace).  Third, we will explore social and political autonomy, including worries about autonomy and the social constitution of selves (Meyers/Friedman), the relationship between autonomy and authenticity (Oshana/Taylor), and the relationship between liberal neutrality, perfectionism, and autonomy (Christman/Hurka/Raz).
595T Set Theory Hardegree TuTh 9:30   Logic Logic
Elementary introduction to the theory of sets (specifically Zermelo-Fraenkel Set Theory). Sets, relations, functions, natural numbers, proof by induction, cardinal numbers. Comparison with other theories of plurality. Pre-requisite: Phil 310 (Intermediate Logic). Requirements: in-class exams.