Phil 100A – Introduction To Philosophy
Kornblith, Hilary
MW 2:30-3:20
Two lectures, one discussion section per week.  This first course in philosophy will be divided into two parts: in the first, we will discuss some central questions in ethics; in the second, we will address questions in the theory of knowledge.  Readings include Plato's Gorgias, John Stuart Mill's Utilitarianism, Bertrand Russell's Problems of Philosophy, and W V Quine's Web of Belief

Phil 100B – Introduction To Philosophy
Schaffer, Jonathan
TuTh 11:15-12:05
In this course we will discuss philosophical issues that are historically important in the development of the Western philosophical tradition, and that continue to be important in the ongoing conversation of contemporary philosophy. These topics include: the nature and extent of human knowledge, the existence of god and the status of religious belief, the relationship between mind and body, and the nature and extent of human freedom.

Phil 100H – Introduction To Philosophy (Honors)
Barnes, Richard (Ty)
MWF 11:15-12:05
This course introduces students to five topics of classical and contemporary philosophical interest.  The topics may be characterized by the following questions:  Can we be certain about what we think we know?  (Epistemological Skepticism); Does God exist, and if He does, what could he be like?  (Metaphysics and Religion); What is the mind, and what is the mind's relation to the body?  (Metaphysics and Mind); and What makes morally right actions morally right?  (The Normative Ethics of Behavior).  In every case the focus is on the clear formulation and defense of theories and arguments.

Phil 110 – Introduction To Logic
Hardegree, Gary
TuTh 1:00-2:15
Introduction to Symbolic Logic. Two logical systems are examined: (1) Sentential Logic, (2) Predicate Logic. Work is equally divided between: (a) translating English sentences into symbolic notation, and (b) constructing formal derivations. Text: Hardegree, Symbolic Logic: A First Course, 3rd ed. Requirements: In-class exams.
For more information, consult http://people.umass.edu/gmhwww/110.

Phil 160A – Introduction To Ethics
Feldman, Fred
MW 12:20-1:10
Two lectures, one discussion per week. Consideration of some of the most important theories about right and wrong, good and evil, and virtue and vice. In each case, one focus will be on clear and accurate formulation of the theory. Another focus will be on understanding and evaluating classic objections to the theory. Readings from Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Bentham, Mill, Kant, Ross, Moore, and others. Text: Feldman, Introduction to Ethics. Requirements: three quizzes; no papers, no final exam. Each student will be permitted to take one quiz over again at the end of the semester.

Phil 160H – Introduction To Ethics
Barnes, Richard T.
MWF, 1:25-2:15
What makes an act right?  What makes someone's life good?  What is virtue?  These are some of the questions that we'll consider this semester.  This course provides an introduction to ethics by way of a discussion of doctrines and arguments in three central areas of moral philosophy--(a) the normative ethics of behavior (the theory of right and wrong action), (b) value theory (the theory of good and evil), and (c) virtue/vice theory (the theory of excellence of character).  Our focus will be on (i) careful study of the relevant texts and (ii) clear and precise formulation and evaluation of the most important theories and arguments. Text: Introduction to Ethics (anthology edited by Fred Feldman); Course Packet. Requirements: 3 Exams, quizzes, a short term paper, and a presentation.

Phil 161 – Problems in Social Thought
Cushing, Jeremy
MWF 10:10-11:00
This class will survey some of the important issues in social and political philosophy. The focus of the class will be on theory but will not shy away from questions about the application of social and political theory in contemporary society. In this class students will learn to approach complicated material analytically and to express ideas clearly in writing. Readings will include an introductory textbook by Jonathan Wolfe as well as primary readings from Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Bentham, Mill, Marx, Rawls, and Nozick among others.

Phil164 – Medical Ethics
Hine, Kristen
TuTh: 9:30-10:45
In this course we explore philosophical concerns that arise in the health-care industry. In the first unit we consider arguments relating to abortion, gene therapy, and cloning. Our second unit consists of material on the just distribution of medical resources, organ donation, animal experimentation, and HIV/AIDS. In our third unit we focus on end-of-life issues. In this unit we evaluate arguments addressing the question of whether there is a moral difference between killing and letting die. The remaining weeks of class are devoted to student presentations. Text: Bioethics: An Anthology. Ed. Helga Kuhse and Peter Singer. Three exams, five quizzes, and in-class presentations.

Phil 164 – Medical Ethics
Staff
MWF 9:05-9:55
An introduction to ethics through issues in medicine and health care. Topics will include abortion, treatment of impaired infants, euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, truth-telling, medical experimentation on human beings and on animals, and the allocation of scarce medical resources. Text: Munson, Intervention and Reflection, 6th edition. Two hour exams and a final, plus optional quizzes and term papers. No prerequisites.

Phil 164H – Medical Ethics
Barnes, Richard T.
TuTh 1:00- 2:15
An introduction to ethics through issues in medicine and health care. Topics will include abortion, treatment of impaired infants, euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, truth-telling, medical experimentation on human beings and on animals, and the allocation of scarce medical resources. Text: Munson, Intervention and Reflection, 6th edition. Two hour exams and a final, plus optional quizzes and term papers. No prerequisites.

Phil 320 – History of Ancient Philosophy
Perin, Casey
TuTh 1:00-2:15
This course is an introduction to the history of Greek philosophy. We shall consider the views of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle on a wide range of issues in ethics, moral psychology, metaphysics, and epistemology

Phil 330 – Continental Rationalism
Platt, Andrew
TuTh 1:00-2:15
This course will be a critical study of selected works in metaphysics, epistemology, philosophical theology, and philosophy of science by17th-century rationalists on the continent. We will focus on the works of Descartes, Spinoza, Malebranche, and Leibniz. Prerequisites: one course in philosophy.

Phil 335 – Contemporary Analytic Philosophy
Klement, Kevin
MWF 11:15-12:05
Consideration of the major trends in British and American philosophy in roughly the first half of the 20th century. Topics include philosophical analysis, logical atomism, logical positivism and "the linguistic turn" in philosophy. Texts: works by Russell, Wittgenstein, Ayer, Kripke and/or others. Requirements: Take-home essay exams, in-class quizzes. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy, or consent of instructor.

Phil 336 – Existential Philosophy
Van der Gaast, Brandt
MWF 10:10-11:00
An introduction to the main themes of Existentialism (such as authenticity, angst, meaning, and death) through a careful reading of Kierkegaard's Fear and Trembling and Nietzsche's Thus Spoke Zarathustra, plus much of Sartre's Being and Nothingness and Heidegger's Being and Time.  Requirements: hour exam, term paper, take-home final exam.  Prerequisite: one course in philosophy.

Phil 362 – Philosophical  Approaches To Politics
Smaw, Eric
MWF 12:20-1:10
In general, philosophy forces us to go beyond our ordinary, sometimes unreflective, intuitions, beliefs, and perceptions by subjecting them to scrutiny using the principles of logic and critical thinking, thereby leading us to sound intuitions, beliefs, and perceptions. In particular, political philosophy, or, at least, this course on philosophy and political theory will subject our everyday intuitions and beliefs about nation building, and justice and equality to scrutiny using the principles of logic and critical thinking. We will consider ancient, modern, and contemporary political theories in order to answer important political questions concerning the proper conditions for building a just state, the proper relation between justice and equality in the state, and the proper principles for adjudicating conflicts between justice and equality in the state. The point of this scrutiny will be twofold: (1) to expose any misconceptions or false beliefs that we might have concerning nation building, and justice and equality so that we can adjust our beliefs, and (2) to gain a better understanding of the role that philosophy plays in answering important political questions.

Phil 382 – Philosophical Approaches to Science
Leibowitz, Uri
TuTh 11:15-12:30

In this course we will review some of the major developments in the philosophy of science in the 20th century, starting with the positivists of the Vienna circle and through the works of Ayer, Popper, Kuhn, Feyerabend and others. Alongside our chronological survey, we will discuss various scientific concepts (e.g., confirmation, refutation, explanation, theory, law of nature) and some famous puzzles that philosophers of science have dealt with (e.g., the demarcation problem, the raven paradox, the problem of induction, the new riddle of induction, the ontological status of theoretical entities). Towards the end of the semester we will discuss some issues concerning the relationship between science and society (feminism, politics, ethics and religion). Requirements: weekly homework assignments, class presentation, a mid-term paper, and a final paper.

Phil 383 – Philosophical Approaches to Religion
Kosciuk, Chris
MWF 1:25- 2:15
Arguments for and against the existence of God – the cosmological argument, the teleological argument, the ontological argument. The problem of evil. Divine attributes – omnipotence, omniscience, and God's temporality.  The role of evidence in religious belief and the rationality of belief in God.

Phil 398W – Junior Year Writing
Staff
Tu 4:00pm-5:15pm
One-credit practicum: must be taken in conjunction with PHIL 320/321. Satisfies the Junior Year Writing Requirement in Philosophy. Weekly discussion sections. Text: Strunk & White, The Elements of Style. Requirements: several short papers, some of which must be rewritten in the light of the insturctor's comments. Pass/Fail only. Prerequisite: English 112 or the equivalent, and Junior class status

Phil 511 – Modal Logic
Hardegree, Gary
TuTh 9:30- 10:45
This course is intended to follow Philosophy 310 (Intermediate Logic), and examines various modal logical systems including alethic modal logic, epistemic logic, deontic logic, tense logic, and the logic of propositional attitudes. Emphasis will be on quantification, identity, descriptions, scoped singular terms, and actuality. Text: Hardegree, Introduction to Modal Logic (available on-line). Prerequisite: Philosophy 310, or consent of the instructor. For more information, consult http://people.umass.edu/gmhwww/511.

Phil 563 – Ethical Theory
Feldman, Fred
MWF 1:25-2:15
In the first half of this course we will study some of the most important theories in the normative ethics of behavior. Among these will be various forms of utilitarianism and various forms of Kantianism. In each case, one focus will be on clear and accurate formulation of the theory. Another focus will be on understanding and evaluating classic objections to the theories. In the second half of the course we will study some of the most important theories of axiology. Among these will be hedonism, eudaimonism, and various forms of axiological pluralism. Readings from Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Bentham, Mill, Kant, Ross, Moore, and others. Text: an anthology of papers in ethics, title TBA. Requirements: two take-home exams, no term paper. Prerequisite: two courses in philosophy.

Phil 582 – Philosophy of Science
Schaffer, Jonathan
TuTh 1:00-2:15
What is scientific explanation? Science is said to enable us to predict, explain, and control the world. We will discuss what it is to explain something, and how science might help with the task. Requirements: graduate student status, or permission of instructor.

Phil 591F – History of Feminist Philosophy
Ferguson, Ann
Th 4:00-6:30
This course will survey European and American feminist philosophers from the 15 th to the 2lst centuries. Authors and topics include: (1) Equality arguments, including (a) Feminist interpretations of Christian theology and (b) Debates about Gender, Reason, Emotion, and Morality; (2) Difference arguments, both differences between women and men and differences between women; (3) Epistemological debates about gendered “standpoints”; (4) Poststructuralist critiques of debates about Gender; and (5) Feminist theories of Freedom and Justice. Prerequisites for undergraduates: Some familiarity with the history of philosophy, social theory, concepts in women’s studies or permission of the instructor.

Philosophy 591P – Platonic Epistemology
Matthews, Gareth B.
Tu 4:00-6:30
This seminar will pursue the question, ‘Whatever happened to the Socratic elenchus?’ We will begin with the Apology, go on to read two or three elenctic dialogues, perhaps the Euthyphro and the Laches, and then take up the transitional dialogue, Meno. We will next try to understand why Plato turns away from the elenctic method in his middle works, especially the Phaedo. And finally we shall try to understand the method of “Collection and Division” as it appears in the Sophist and Statesman. Readings will focus on primary texts, but will also include articles and commentaries. Prerequisite: at least one course in ancient philosophy. Requirements: class presentations, a short paper, and a longer paper at the end.

Phil 593S – Philosophy of Space and Time
Skow, Bradford
TuTh 11:15-12:30
Newton argued that we need to believe in absolute space and time in order to do physics. In the first part of this course we will look at his arguments and relationalist responses by Leibniz, Mach, and others. Then we will look at this (and related) debates in a more contemporary setting, framed as debates about the existence and structure of spacetime, instead of space and time seperately. Other topics will include conventionalism about the structure of spacetime and the nature of time in special and general relativity. Prerequisites: two courses in philosophy and high-school algebra, or consent of the instructor.