100 - Introduction to Philosophy (AL)
TuTh 11:15-12:30
Schaffer, 359 Bartlett
In this course we will discuss philosophical issues that are historically important in the development of the Western philosophical tradition, and that continue to be important in the ongoing conversation of contemporary philosophy. These topics include: the nature and extent of human knowledge, the existence of god and the status of religious belief, the relationship between mind and body, and the nature and extent of human freedom.

100 - Introduction to Philosophy (AL)
MWF 2:30
TBA

100H - Introduction to Philosophy (Honors)
MWF 10:10-11:00
Ty Barnes
This course provides an introduction to philosophy by way of a discussion of four central philosophical problems - the problem of free will and determinism; the problem of the nature of knowledge, the "mind-body" problem (including puzzles about personal identity); and the problem of the existence and nature of God.  In each case, the focus is on careful formulation of doctrines and arguments.  The goals are (i) to understand the doctrines and arguments; (ii) to develop the ability to evaluate the doctrines and arguments; and (iii) to begin to develop the ability to extract well-formulated, interesting arguments from philosophical texts including: Descartes, Meditations on First Philosophy; Plato, Theaetetus and Phaedo; Perry, A Dialogue on Personal Identity and Immortality; Course Packet. Requirements: 3 Exams, quizzes, a short term paper, and a presentation

110 - Introduction to Logic (R2)
TuTh 1:00-2:15
Hardegree, 363 Bartlett
Introduction to Symbolic Logic. Two logical systems are examined: (1) Sentential Logic, (2) Predicate Logic. Work is equally divided between: (a) translating English sentences into symbolic notation, and (b) constructing formal derivations. Text: Hardegree, Symbolic Logic: A First Course, 3rd ed. Requirements: In-class exams.
For more information, consult http://people.umass.edu/gmhwww/110.

160 - Introduction to Ethics (AT)
MW 12:20
Klement, 353 Bartlett
Two lectures, one discussion per week. Consideration of some of the most important theories about right and wrong, good and evil, and virtue and vice. One focus will be on clear and accurate formulation of the theories. Another focus will be on understanding and evaluating common objections to the theories. Texts: Readings may include classic works by Plato, Aristotle, Bentham, Mill, Kant, Ross, Moore, as well as contemporary thinkers. Requirements: essay exams, papers and participation in discussion.

160b - Introduction to Ethics (Residential Course)
TuTh 1:00-2:15
Justin Klockseim, Bartlett 377
This class provides an introduction to ethics by way of a discussion of doctrines and arguments in two central areas of  moral philosophy -- (a) the normative ethics of behavior (the  theory of right and wrong action) and (b) value theory (the theory  of good and evil).
Along the way, other important topics in moral philosophy will be discussed.
In each case, the focus is on careful formulation of doctrines and arguments.  The goals are (i) to understand the doctrines and arguments; (ii) to develop the ability to evaluate the doctrines and arguments; and (iii) to begin to develop the ability to extract well-formulated, interesting arguments from philosophical texts.

160c - Introduction to Ethics (Residential Course)
TuTh 1-2:15
Andrew Platt, Bartlett 351
An introduction to influential ethical theories via readings from the history of ethics.  Emphasis will be placed on the critical evaluation of these theories.  The course will include units devoted to theories in the Normative Ethics of Behavior, Axiology and Virtue/Vice Theory.  Readings will include Plato, Aristotle, Bentham, Mill and Kant.  All readings are from Introduction to Ethics, edited by Fred Feldman.  Requirements: Two exams, three short papers, class attendance and class participation.

160H - Introduction to Ethics (Honors)
MWF 1:25
Ty Barnes
What makes an act right?  What makes someone's life good?  What is virtue?  These are some of the questions that we'll consider this semester.  This course provides an introduction to ethics by way of a discussion of doctrines and arguments in three central areas of moral philosophy--(a) the normative ethics of behavior (the theory of right and wrong action), (b) value theory (the theory of good and evil), and (c) virtue/vice theory (the theory of excellence of character).  Our focus will be on (i) careful study of the relevant texts and (ii) clear and precise formulation and evaluation of the most important theories and arguments. Text: Introduction to Ethics (anthology edited by Fred Feldman); Course Packet. Requirements: 3 Exams, quizzes, a short term paper, and a presentation.

161 - Problems in Social Thought
TuTh 11:15-12:30
Ferguson, 370 Bartlett
A survey of theories of the ideal relation between citizens and states, particularly focusing on theories of democracy, citizenship, and gender, and on problems of globalization.  We will consider classic defenses and critiques of the state (ancient, liberal, Marxist, anarchist) and views of civil disobedience.  Some contemporary feminist and critical race theories of the state and its relation to the family, civil society, and the emerging global economy will also be covered.  Texts: Somerville and Santoni (eds), Social and Political Philosophy; Lummis, Radical Democracy;  a xeroxed collection of readings.  Requirements: class participation, 3 short thought papers, a mid-term take-home exam, and a 5-8 page term paper.

164, Lecture 1 - Medical Ethics (AT)
TuTh 9:30-10:45
Matthews, 368 Bartlett
An introduction to ethics through issues in medicine and health care. Topics will include abortion, treatment of impaired infants, euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, truth-telling, medical experimentation on human beings and on animals, and the allocation of scarce medical resources. Text: Munson, Intervention and Reflection, 6th edition. Two hour exams and a final, plus optional quizzes and term papers. No prerequisites.

164, Lecture 2 - Medical Ethics (AT)
MWF 9:05
Staff
DESCRIPTION FORTHCOMING

164, Lecture 3 - Medical Ethics (AT)
MWF 10:10
Staff
DESCRIPTION FORTHCOMING

164H - Medical Ethics (Honors)
TuTh 1:00-2:15
Ty Barnes
An introduction to ethics through issues in medicine and health care. Topics will include abortion, treatment of impaired infants, euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, truth-telling, medical experimentation on human beings and on animals, and the allocation of scarce medical resources. Text: Munson, Intervention and Reflection, 6th edition. Two hour exams and a final, plus optional quizzes and term papers.

320 - History of Ancient Philosophy (HS)
TuTh 1:00-2:15
Chappell, 380 Bartlett
This course is an introduction to the history of Greek philosophy. We shall consider the views of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle on a wide range of issues in ethics, moral psychology, metaphysics, and epistemology.

336 - Existential Philosophy
MWF 10:10
Staff
An examination of the main themes of Existentialism through a careful reading of selections from Kierkegaard's Fear and Trembling, Nietzsche's The Gay Science, Heidegger's Being and Time, and Sartre's Being and Nothingness. Topics will include the teleological suspension of the ethical, knowledge and morality after the death of God, authenticity, existence, the life world, intersubjectivity, and freedom. Text: Existentialism Basic Writings, edited by Charles Guignon and Derk Pereboom. Course requirements include 2 papers and in-class quizzes.

361 - Philosophy of Art (AT)
MWF 11:15
Brian Kiniry
Philosophy of art is the systematic study of the nature of art and the character of aesthetic experience. In this course we’ll consider the following questions, among others. What is a work of art? Are there objective standards for evaluating works of art? Can art have a cognitive value, in addition to an aesthetic value? Should ethical considerations play a role in judging the aesthetic merits of a work of art? In answering these questions, the focus will be primarily ­ but not exclusively ­ on the visual arts. In addition to familiarizing themselves with the details of the issues, students will learn how to extract and critically evaluate some of the main arguments from the assigned readings.

362 - Approaches to Politics and Society
MWF 12:20
Jason Raibley
A study of classic and contemporary approaches to political theory. Topics include the nature of individual rights, justification of state authority, the value of liberty, and distributive justice. The main readings will be Locke's Second Treatise and "Letter on Toleration," Mill's On Liberty, John Rawls' A Theory of Justice, and Robert Nozick's Anarchy, State, and Utopia. These will be supplemented by additional short readings from Marx, Engels, Milton Friedman, Susan Moller Okin, Iris Marion Young, and G. A. Cohen.

381H - Philosophy of Woman (SBD, SBG, SBU)
TuTh 2:30-3:45
Ferguson, 370 Bartlett
A comparison of philosophical theories of gender and sexuality, including Natural purpose theory (ancient Greek and Christian thought), biological determinism, Freudianism and Foucault. We will investigate the ways that women and their bodies have been viewed by feminist theorists on female embodiment such as Beauvoir, Rich, Wittig and Butler. Issues will include: the relation between sex, gender and sexuality, dichotomies between ideals of masculinity/femininity, reason/emotion, subject/object, connection between oppression by race, class, sexuality and gender, representations of women and theories of self, identity and subjectivity. Texts will include Conboy, Medina and Stanbury, eds. Writing on the Body: Female Embodiment and Feminist Theory; Freud Sexuality and the Psychology of Love; Foucault History of Sexuality; v.1; Feinberg Stone Butch Blues and selected xerox readings. Prerequisites include either a 100 level Philosophy class or WOST 201 or permission of the instructor. Phil 381 satisfies I and D general education requirements. Course requirements include class participation, 2 short papers, a mid-term exam and an 8-10 page term paper. Course receives 4 credits.

382 - Philosophical Approaches to Science
Topic : Darwinian Theories

TuTh 11:15-12:30
Kornblith, 360 Bartlett
Darwin presented a theory of evolution, designed to explain the origin of species. It is impossible to understand almost anything in biology without understanding the nature of evolution. We will begin the course with a look at Darwin's views and at contemporary evolutionary theory with an eye to understanding just what is settled and what areas are objects of controversy. We will then move on to look at Darwinian approaches to a wide range of topics, including sociobiology and evolutionary psychology. We will read Daniel Dennett's Darwin's Dangerous Idea, as well as some work by Richard Dawkins, Stephen Jay Gould, John Dupre, Leda Cosmides, John Tooby, Philip Kitcher, Elliott Sober, and others. Several short papers will be required.

398W - Junior Year Writing Course
W 3.35-4.50
Chappell, 380 Bartlett
One-credit practicum: must be taken in conjunction with PHIL 320. Satisfies the Junior Year Writing Requirement in Philosophy. Weekly discussion sections. Text: Strunk & White, The Elements of Style. Requirments: several short papers, some of which must be rewritten in the light of the insturctor's comments. Pass/Fail only. Prerequisite: English 112 or the equivalent, and Junior class status.

511 - Modal Logic
TuTh 9:30-10:45
Hardegree, 363 Bartlett
This course is intended to follow Philosophy 310 (Intermediate Logic), and examines various modal logical systems including alethic modal logic, epistemic logic, deontic logic, tense logic, and the logic of propositional attitudes. Emphasis will be on quantification, identity, descriptions, scoped singular terms, and actuality. Text: Hardegree, Introduction to Modal Logic (available on-line). Prerequisite: Philosophy 310, or consent of the instructor. For more information, consult http://people.umass.edu/gmhwww/511.

593E - Epistemology
Tu 1:00-3:30
Schaffer, 359 Bartlett
This course will focus on the nature of knowledge, its relation to other mental states, its connection to evidence, practical reasoning, and social practices like assertion. We will read through Timothy Williamson's book Knowledge and its Limits, and John Hawthorne's book Knowledge and Lotteries. Requirements: Seminar paper. Prerequisites: Graduate students and advanced undergraduates only.

593L -- Philosophy of Language
M 3:35 - 6:05
Bricker, 356 Bartlett
This is a course in contemporary analytic philosophy of language focusing on theories of meaning and reference, especially for names and descriptions. It is geared towards graduate students and advanced philosophy majors. The material is often difficult, and requires strong analytical skills on the part of the student. Prerequisite: At least two philosophy courses including elementary symbolic logic.