100, Section 1a - Introduction to Philosophy
(AL) Schaffer, 359 Bartlett
Two lectures, one discussion per week. In this course we will discuss philosophical issues that are historically important in the development of the Western philosophical tradition, and that continue to be important in the ongoing conversation of contemporary philosophy. These topics include: the nature and extent of human knowledge, the existence of god and the status of religious belief, the relationship between mind and body, and the nature and extent of human freedom. Requirements: participation in weekly discussion sections, several papers and/or exams.
100, Section 2b - Introduction to Philosophy
(AL) Chappell, 380 Bartlett
Two lectures, one discussion per week. An introduction to philosophical thinking, stressing the formulation and evaluation of logical arguments. Readings include traditional as well as contemporary works. Discussion of such topics as the nature of knowledge, the human mind, death and immortality, the existence of God, and the problem of evil. Texts: Plato, Apology, Crito, Meno, and Phaedo; Descartes, Meditations; two recent dialogues by John Perry. Requirements: several quizzes and exams, final exam.
100, Lecture 3XN - Introduction to Philosophy
(AL) Bell
Description forthcoming.
100, Section 4n - Introduction to Philosophy
(AL) Rosental
In this course we examine seriously the question, "What is Philosophy?" We will look at answers given to this question over four major philosophical time periods: ancient, medieval, early modern (17th century) and contemporary (20th century). Readings include historically significant works in philosophy that also help provide insight into the nature of philosophy itself.
100W - Introduction to Philosophy
(AL) Hine
(Open to Southwest residents only.)
This course will provide students with a basic introduction to a number of philosophical issues. We will begin by asking, "what is philosophy," and "what is the value of philosophy." We will then discuss topics in the philosophy of religion, where we will consider arguments for the existence of God and the problem of evil. Next we will discuss questions associated with knowledge and reality, with an emphasis on various historical treatments of these problems. Our last two units will cover the mind/body problem, and puzzles and paradoxes, respectively. Our readings will include articles by both classic and contemporary philosophers. Course requirements are as follows: four take-home exams, and four in-class quizzes.
110 - Introduction to Logic
(R2) Hardegree, 363 Bartlett
Introduction to Symbolic Logic. Two logical systems are examined: (1) Sentential Logic, (2) Predicate Logic. Work is equally divided between: (a) translating English sentences into symbolic notation, and (b) constructing formal derivations. Text: Hardegree, Symbolic Logic: A First Course, 3rd ed. For more information, consult http://www-unix.oit.umass.edu/~gmhwww/110.
160, Lecture 1 - Introduction to Ethics
(AT) Feldman, 362 Bartlett
Two lectures, one discussion per week. Consideration of some of the most important theories about right and wrong, good and evil, and virtue and vice. In each case, one focus will be on clear and accurate formulation of the theory. Another focus will be on understanding and evaluating classic objections to the theory. Readings from Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Bentham, Mill, Kant, Ross, Moore, and others. Text: Feldman, Introduction to Ethics. Requirements: three quizzes; no papers, no final exam. Each student will be permitted to take one quiz over again at the end of the semester.
160, Lecture 2XN - Introduction to Ethics
(AT) Kiniry
Description forthcoming
160O - Introduction to Ethics
(AT) Lascano
Orchard Hill and Central Area Residents Only
This course will provide an introduction to the field of ethics. The course is divided into three sections: (1) Metaethics (the study of the origin and meaning of ethical concepts), where we will consider such questions as "Does morality have its foundation in social convention?" and "Is morality instituted, or perhaps created, by God through natural law or commands?"; (2) Normative Ethics (theories of right and wrong actions), where we will examine several theories concerning the criterion of moral conduct, including utilitarianism and Kantian moral theory; (3) Applied ethics, where we will examine specific controversial moral issues, such as abortion and animal rights. Text: Fieser, Metaethics, Normative Ethics, and Applied Ethics. Requirements: Weekly quizzes and three take-home exams.
160R - Introduction to Ethics
(AT) Heathwood
This course provides an introduction to ethics by way of a discussion of doctrines and arguments primarily in one area of moral philosophy: the normative ethics of behavior (the theory of right and wrong action). We will take brief detours into two other areas of moral philosophy: value theory (the theory of good and bad), and virtue theory (the theory of excellence and deficiency of character). If time permits, we will study one or two of the following issues in applied ethics: abortion, world poverty, animal rights, and the environment.
164, Lecture 1 - Medical Ethics
(AT) Matthews, 368 Bartlett
An introduction to ethics through issues in medicine and health care. Topics will include abortion, treatment of impaired infants, euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, truth-telling, medical experimentation on human beings and on animals, and the allocation of scarce medical resources. Text: Munson, Intervention and Reflection, 6th ed. Requirements: two hour-exams; final exam; optional quizzes and term papers.
164, Lecture 2 - Medical Ethics
(AT) Kiniry
Description forthcoming.
164, Lecture 3X - Medical Ethics
(AT) Susse
This course provides an introduction to applied ethics, one branch of the academic discipline of philosophy, by focusing on ethical issues in medicine. We will begin with a brief study of ethical theory, philosophical terminology, and philosophical methods. We will then investigate the application of ethical theory to the topics listed on the syllabus, by looking closely at the views and arguments of philosophers, journalists, and medical professionals. We will focus on issues involving questions of personhood (animal experimentation, abortion, and impaired infants), self determination and paternalism (euthanasia, truth telling, confidentiality, and reproductive technologies), and just distribution of resources (organ transplantation). The course assumes no prior knowledge of, or familiarity with, philosophy in general, nor with ethics in particular.
164, Lecture 4 - Medical Ethics
(AT) Susse
This course provides an introduction to applied ethics, one branch of the academic discipline of philosophy, by focusing on ethical issues in medicine. We will begin with a brief study of ethical theory, philosophical terminology, and philosophical methods. We will then investigate the application of ethical theory to the topics listed on the syllabus, by looking closely at the views and arguments of philosophers, journalists, and medical professionals. We will focus on issues involving questions of personhood (animal experimentation, abortion, and impaired infants), self determination and paternalism (euthanasia, truth telling, confidentiality, and reproductive technologies), and just distribution of resources (organ transplantation). The course assumes no prior knowledge of, or familiarity with, philosophy in general, nor with ethics in particular.
164W - Medical Ethics
(AT) McDaniel
(Open to Southwest residents only.) Description forthcoming.
320 - History of Ancient Philosophy
Casey Perin, 357 Bartlett
This course is an introduction to the history of Greek philosophy. We shall consider the views of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle on a wide range of issues in ethics, moral psychology, metaphysics, and epistemology.
330 - Continental Rationalism
Eileen O'Neill, 379 Bartlett
A critical study of selected works in metaphysics, epistemology, and philosophical theology by17th-century rationalists on the continent and in England: Descartes, Malebranche, More, Cavendish and Leibniz. Requirements: a short weekly writing assignment; midterm and final exams. Prerequisites: one course in philosophy.
334 - American Philosophy
Lynne Baker, Bartlett 366
A study of American philosophy from the 18th c. through the 20th c. Beginning with Jonathan Edwards, the great Calvinist philosopher, and moving through the 19th c. philosophers influenced by Darwin, we will consider the influence of theology and of Darwinian theory on American thought. Since pragmatism is America's distinctive contribution to philosophy, we will pay special attention to the pragmatists - Peirce, James and Dewey - and to their successors (such as Quine, Davidson and Rorty). Readings will probably include selections from Edwards' Freedom of the Will; Peirce's "The Fixation of Belief," and "How to Make Our Ideas Clear;" James' "What Pragmatism Means" and "The Will to Believe;" Dewey, "The Influence of Darwinism on Philosophy" - among others. Course requirements: exams, papers, class participation. Prerequisites: At least one philosophy course.
335 - Analytic Philosophy
Kevin Klement, 353 Bartlett
Consideration of British and American philosophy in roughly the first half of
the 20th century. Topics include philosophical analysis, logical form, logical
atomism, logical positivism and "the linguistic turn" in philosophy. Texts: works by Russell, Wittgenstein, Moore, Austin, Ayer and/or others. Requirements: Take home exams, papers. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy, or consent of instructor.
381H - Philosophy of Woman
Ann Ferguson, 370 Bartlett
A comparison of philosophical theories of gender and sexuality, including Natural purpose theory (ancient Greek and Christian thought), biological determinism, Freudianism and Foucault. We will investigate the ways that women and their bodies have been viewed by feminist theorists on female embodiment such as Beauvoir, Rich, Wittig and Butler. Issues will include: the relation between sex, gender and sexuality, dichotomies between ideals of masculinity/femininity, reason/emotion, subject/object, connection between oppression by race, class, sexuality and gender, representations of women and theories of self, identity and subjectivity. Texts will include Conboy, Medina and Stanbury, eds. Writing on the Body: Female Embodiment and Feminist Theory; Freud Sexuality and the Psychology of Love; Foucault History of Sexuality; v.1; Feinberg Stone Butch Blues and selected xerox readings. Prerequisites include either a 100 level Philosophy class or WOST 201 or permission of the instructor. Phil 381 satisfies I and D general education requirements. Course requirements include class participation, 2 short papers, a mid-term exam and an 8-10 page term paper. Course receives 4 credits.
382 - Philosophical Approaches to Science
Bridge
Description forthcoming.
393L - Philosophy in Literature
Chappell, 380 Bartlett
Seminar. Examination of philosophical themes in works of literature. Emphasis on clear formulation and critical evaluation of doctrines and arguments. Works to be studied include Lucretius's The Nature of Things, Dante's Paradise, Pope's Essay on Man, and some plays by Jean-Paul Sartre. Requirements: frequent short papers, class presentations, final paper; no exams. Prerequisites: two courses in philosophy or literature, or permission of the instructor.
511 - Modal Logic
Hardegree, 363 Bartlett
This course is intended to follow Philosophy 310 (Intermediate Logic), and examines various modal logical systems including alethic modal logic, epistemic logic, deontic logic, tense logic, and the logic of propositional attitudes. Emphasis will be on quantification, identity, descriptions, scoped singular terms, and actuality. Text: Hardegree, Introduction to Modal Logic (available on-line). Prerequisite: Philosophy 310, or consent of the instructor. For more information, consult http://www-unix.oit.umass.edu/~gmhwww/511.
512 - Philosophy and Logic (Topic: Set Theory)
Bricker, 356 Bartlett
The first ten weeks provide a self-contained, mathematically rigorous introduction to set theory, focusing on topics of philosophical relevance, including relations and functions, mathematical induction, infinite sets, and the Axiom of Choice. The last three weeks will focus on David Lewis's philosophical theory of sets, which combines set theory with mereology, the theory of parts and wholes. Texts: Enderton, The Elements of Set Theory; Lewis, Parts of Classes. Three take-home exams, and five or six problem sets. Prerequisites: some background in formal logic, or consent of the instructor.
563 - Ethical Theory
Feldman, 362 Bartlett
In the first half of this course we will study some of the most important theories in the normative ethics of behavior. Among these will be various forms of utilitarianism and various forms of Kantianism. In each case, one focus will be on clear and accurate formulation of the theory. Another focus will be on understanding and evaluating classic objections to the theories. In the second half of the course we will study some of the most important theories of axiology. Among these will be hedonism, eudaimonism, and various forms of axiological pluralism. Readings from Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Bentham, Mill, Kant, Ross, Moore, and others. Text: an anthology of papers in ethics, title TBA. Requirements: two take-home exams, no term paper. Prerequisite: two courses in philosophy.
591C - Causation in Early Modern Philosophy
Eileen O'Neill, 379 Bartlett
An examination of some pre-Humean early modern views about causation, including those of mechanism, neostoicism, occasionalism, and the pre-established harmony. Requirements: class presentation(s), a short paper on an assigned topic, and a term paper on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. Prerequisites: Undergraduates must have previously taken one of the following history courses (Phil. 321, 330 or 331) and an additional philosophy course.
591K - Kant
Bruce Aune, 360 Bartlett
This course will provide a critical examination of the principal claims and arguments in Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. Emphasis will be placed in the second edition of Kant's text, but some of the material from his first edition will also be examined. Textbook: Kant, Critique of Pure Reason, tr. Paul Guyer and Allen Wood (Cambridge: CUP,1997). Course requirements: Mid-semester and Final take-home exams. A term paper of 10-12 pages will also be required for graduate students.