News

2015 PEP Fellow Nilanjana Dasgupta's research on the impact of female mentors for women studying engineering is cited in Smartcompany.com

A story in Smartcompany.com about female mentors for women studying engineering cites recent research by Nilanjana Dasgupta, 2015 PEP Fellow, and her doctoral student Tara C. Dennehy, that found that early in college, young women in engineering majors felt more confident about their ability, a greater sense of belonging in engineering, more motivated and less anxious if they had a female, but not male, peer mentor. At the end of the first college year, a remarkable 100 percent of women students mentored by advanced female peers were still in engineering majors, Dasgupta says.

2017 PEP Fellow, Jonathan Wynn, discusses what shapes certain cities' affinities towards gentrification in The Conversation

Jonathan R. Wynn, 2017 PEP Fellow, is co-author of an opinion piece in The Conversation that discusses gentrification and why it is welcomed in some cities and neighborhoods but hated in others. He says small cities such as Hartford, Conn., would like to see an influx of new residents and businesses and officials there say they would welcome gentrification, while neighborhoods in expensive cities such as New York or San Francisco see such changes as threatening. 

PEP Steering Committee Member Linda Tropp is quoted in Time about how social norms regarding anger shape the potential for violence in the US

Linda Tropp, PEP Steering Committee Member, is quoted in an opinion piece in Time about the level of anger that seems to permeate America, and how increasing rage and contempt toward our fellow countrymen and women can serve as a spark to cause incidents such as the recent mass-shooting in Las Vegas. “Social norms play incredibly important roles in shaping our behavior,” she says. "We look to others in our social environment to learn whether to respond to events with violent or peaceful actions, with hatred or friendliness.” 

2016 PEP Fellow Ellen Pader's research on how US housing regulations shape Americans' approach to space is covered on BBC broadcast The Why Factor

Ellen Pader, 2016 PEP Fellow, is interviewed on BBC broadcast The Why Factor on an episode on small living. Pader describes how cultures approach space in different ways. She offers the cross cultural example that that in Mexico, sharing beds and bathrooms is preferred, while in the US, the emphasis is on more space, less sharing. Pader argues that Americans' approach to space is related to how US housing regulations promote the building of larger spaces, emphasizing individualism rather than interdependence. Listen to the story here.

2015 PEP Fellow Nilanjana Dasgupta's research on how female mentors benefit young women engineering majors is covered in Forbes

A columnist writing in Forbes about how to get diversity right cites recent research by Nilanjana Dasgupta, 2015 PEP Fellow, and her doctoral student Tara C. Dennehy that found that early in college, young women in engineering majors felt more confident about their ability, a greater sense of belonging in engineering, more motivated and less anxious if they had a female, but not male, peer mentor. At the end of the first college year, a remarkable 100 percent of women students mentored by advanced female peers were still in engineering majors, Dasgupta says.

2017 PEP Fellow Jonathan Wynn discusses how small cities use music festivals for cultural promotion in Jezebel

Jonathan R. Wynn, 2017 PEP Fellow, comments in Jezebel.com about why small cities use music festivals to promote themselves as cultural centers and hip places. “There is something about this being a cheaper avenue for getting a kind of cultural distinction to attract new residents and hopefully news businesses, new tourists, for smaller towns or smaller communities,” he says. Wynn has written a book on festivals. 

Rebecca Spencer, 2015 PEP Fellow, receives five year $2.64 million NIH grant to study the impact of naps on preschoolers

2015 PEP Fellow Rebecca Spencer recently received a five-year, $2.64 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to explore, in a series of laboratory and preschool-based studies, whether mid-day napping benefits learning in young children and helps them cope with emotions.Improving early education can enhance child development and school readiness, factors that are known to have lifelong effects on physical and mental health, she notes. Read more in the Boston Globe.

2016 PEP Fellow R. Thomas Zoeller comments in the Baltimore Sun on efforts to ban toxic fire-resistant chemicals in children's products

2016 PEP Fellow R. Thomas Zoeller comments in a story in the Baltimore Sun about efforts to ban toxic fire-resistant chemicals in children’s products such as furniture, mattresses and household electronics. Zoeller says the chemicals interfere with hormones during early brain development. “These chemicals are robbing our children of critical human potential,” he says.

2015 PEP Fellow Nilanjana Dasgupta's study on how women mentors help female engineering students is covered in Control Engineering

A study by 2015 PEP Fellow Nilanjana Dasgupta and her doctoral student Tara C. Dennehy at UMass Amherst, covered in Control Engineering, found that early in college, young women in engineering majors felt more confident about their ability, a greater sense of belonging in engineering, more motivated and less anxious if they had a female, but not male, peer mentor. At the end of the first college year, a remarkable 100 percent of women students mentored by advanced female peers were still in engineering majors, Dasgupta says.

2016 PEP Fellow Jeff Blaustein publishes article on the effects of breast cancer treatments on postmenopausal women in Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences

Jeff Blaustein, 2016 PEP Fellow, publishes “Treatments for Breast Cancer that Affect Cognitive Function in Postmenopausal Women” in the policy journal Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences. The article offers a review of the potential adverse effects of the breast cancer treatments on postmenopausal patients’ quality of life, and aims to provide women and oncologists with information that will encourage them to consider side effects of aromatase inhibitors (AIs) treatment on the brain. 

Pages