Hanne M. Watkins joins Peace Program

We welcome Hannah M. Watkins to the Peace program as a Post Doctoral Fellow in Fall, 2018

Hanne M. Watkins holds a BA (Hons.) in Psychology and Linguistics, and a Master’s degree in Clinical Psychology from the University of Melbourne, in Australia. She also completed her Ph.D. in Social Psychology at the University of Melbourne, in 2016. Her main research interests are moral psychology, intergroup conflict, and philosophical “just war theory,” which is why her thesis was on how people make moral judgments about killing in war.

Tawakkol Karman, 2011 Nobel Peace Prize Recipient

On Wednesday, April 4, 2018 the 2011 Nobel Peace Prize Recipient Tawakkol Karman spent a day at UMass, culminated by a talk in the Bernie Dallas Room to a large crowd on the topic of 

Nonviolence as a Means of Struggle, Change and Success

Tawakkol Karman was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2011 in recognition of her work in non-violent struggle for the expression rights, safety of women and for women’s rights to full participation in peace-building work in Yemen.

While here on campus, she met with undergraduate and graduate students before giving her talk.

Sponsored by UMass Amherst Psychology of Peace and Violence Program and the UMass Lowell Greeley Scholars for Peace Studies Award

 

Statement of Solidarity with Academics for Peace

The Psychology of Peace and Violence Program stands in solidarity with the signatories of the January 2016 Peace Petition, who are now facing a fresh round of criminal indictments.
Read our full statement

Our Faculty, Students and Graduates in the News

Ervin Staub quoted in Discovery News article on the recent French Train attack

French train attack

 Ervin Staub says people react differently to stressful circumstances such as the recent disarming of a shooter on a French train by three American tourists. “Some people are calmer under certain circumstances,” he says. In a tense situation, some people react quickly and are willing to engage while others are slow to respond, while still others just watch, what he calls the bystander effect.

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Ervin Staub blogs on Huffington Post about unlawful use of force by police

Now that the media and the country pay attention, after shocking instances, almost everyday there are more reports of police officers having used unnecessary force, needlessly harming people. Some of these reports are of new events, which I will discuss later. Others are about events a year or two ago that now receive attention.

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N.E. Psychologist interviewed Linda Tropp about The Psychology of Peace and Violence Program

Linda Tropp, who has written several books on group dynamics and prejudice reduction, has received awards for her work and has presented social science evidence in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on racial integration, spoke with New England Psychologist’s Catherine Robertson Souter about the work she and her co-faculty members are doing with the UMass program and how their graduates are working to illuminate all sides of the issue of violence.

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