Tawakkol Karman, 2011 Nobel Peace Prize Recipient

On Wednesday, April 4, 2018 the 2011 Nobel Peace Prize Recipient Tawakkol Karman spent a day at UMass, culminated by a talk in the Bernie Dallas Room to a large crowd on the topic of 
Nonviolence as a Means of Struggle, Change and Success

Tawakkol Karman was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2011 in recognition of her work in non-violent struggle for the expression rights, safety of women and for women’s rights to full participation in peace-building work in Yemen.

While here on campus, she met with undergraduate and graduate students before giving her talk.

Sponsored by UMass Amherst Psychology of Peace and Violence Program and the UMass Lowell Greeley Scholars for Peace Studies Award

 

Statement of Solidarity with Academics for Peace

The Psychology of Peace and Violence Program stands in solidarity with the signatories of the January 2016 Peace Petition, who are now facing a fresh round of criminal indictments.
Read our full statement

Our Faculty, Students and Graduates in the News

Stellan Vinthagen profiled in Waging Nonviolence and Truthout

Stellan Vinthagen

Stellan Vinthagen was profiled as Head of the first university initiative on Civil Resistance in both Waging Nonviolence and Truthout. 

With parents who were Gandhian vegetarians and a grandfather who was sent to military prison during World War II for helping Jews enter Sweden, Stellan Vinthagen has nonviolent resistance in his blood.

Read More

Katya Migacheva accepted a position with the RAND Corporation

Katya Migacheva

Graduate Katya Migacheva recently accepted a position with the RAND Corporation (http://www.rand.org), where she now serves as an Associate Behavioral and Social Scientist. At RAND, Katya hopes to combine her expertise in both science and policy and to continue and expand her work on societies in transition and relations between racial, ethnic, and national groups.

Pages

Subscribe to Front page feed