Tawakkol Karman, 2011 Nobel Peace Prize Recipient

On Wednesday, April 4, 2018 the 2011 Nobel Peace Prize Recipient Tawakkol Karman spent a day at UMass, culminated by a talk in the Bernie Dallas Room to a large crowd on the topic of 
Nonviolence as a Means of Struggle, Change and Success

Tawakkol Karman was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2011 in recognition of her work in non-violent struggle for the expression rights, safety of women and for women’s rights to full participation in peace-building work in Yemen.

While here on campus, she met with undergraduate and graduate students before giving her talk.

Sponsored by UMass Amherst Psychology of Peace and Violence Program and the UMass Lowell Greeley Scholars for Peace Studies Award

 

Statement of Solidarity with Academics for Peace

The Psychology of Peace and Violence Program stands in solidarity with the signatories of the January 2016 Peace Petition, who are now facing a fresh round of criminal indictments.
Read our full statement

Our Faculty, Students and Graduates in the News

N.E. Psychologist interviewed Linda Tropp about The Psychology of Peace and Violence Program

Linda Tropp, who has written several books on group dynamics and prejudice reduction, has received awards for her work and has presented social science evidence in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on racial integration, spoke with New England Psychologist’s Catherine Robertson Souter about the work she and her co-faculty members are doing with the UMass program and how their graduates are working to illuminate all sides of the issue of violence.

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Linda Tropp comments in a story about "implicit bias" in the Amherst schools on NEPR

The Amherst, Massachusetts, public schools have been talking a lot about race since last year, when an African-American math teacher was the target of racist graffiti around the high school. In response, the school committee created a task force to advise it on matters of “equity.” Now, task force members want the district to tackle a more subtle form of racism — something called “implicit bias.

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