The University of Massachusetts Amherst
UManage Center

Year Two Pilot Projects

Sleep Self-Management in Pregnancy Using a Personalized Health-Monitoring Device

PI: Mary Paterno, PhD CNM

Co-I: Rebecca Spencer, PhD

Co-I: Marquis Hawkins, PhD

Dr. Paterno’s pilot project will establish the feasibility and acceptability of conducting a 12-week intervention for sleep self-management with pregnant women using a personalized health-monitoring device, in order to refine the intervention for a larger, randomized trial. The central hypothesis is that women who use a personalized health-monitoring device to self-manage sleep in pregnancy will have higher sleep quality and lower depressive symptoms. The participants will engage with the intervention and report positive attitudes toward using a personalized health-monitoring device to manage sleep in pregnancy. The long-term goal of the study is to understand and improve sleep and physical activity across pregnancy and the early parenting years, thereby improving pregnancy outcomes and the transition to parenthood.

This is an important problem, because pregnancy-associated sleep disorders are experienced by up to 82 percent of women and may increase the risk for pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes, longer labor, cesarean birth, and postpartum depression. Moreover, sleep problems during pregnancy are most common among pregnant women of lower socioeconomic status. There is a critical need to improve sleep among pregnant women, particularly women of lower socioeconomic status who are at greater risk of experiencing sleep disorders, in order to improve maternal and infant outcomes through reduction of risk for acute and chronic disease. Traditional clinical management of sleep disorders in pregnancy includes education and counseling on sleep hygiene and sleep positioning, dietary modifications, relaxation, iron supplementation, weight management, and physical activity, yet education-based behavioral interventions show minimal effectiveness for improving sleep among pregnant women. These methods typically do not incorporate objective self-monitoring, which is an important behavior change technique. In pregnancy, objective self-monitoring on a day-to-day basis is particularly important as sleep disorders may worsen as pregnancy progresses. 

Computer-based personalized health-monitoring devices may serve as an effective tool with which pregnant women can self-manage sleep. Personalized health-monitoring devices may be effective in promoting self-management of sleep through regular feedback. This strategy may be beneficial not only for women with pregnancy-associated sleep disorders but also for pregnant women with less severe sleep disruptions that experience daytime sleepiness, fatigue, and decreased quality of life. 

Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute of Nursing Research of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number P20NR016599. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official view of the National Institutes of Health.

Mary Paterno

Mary Paterno

Assistant Professor

Campus Address: 
Skinner Hall 130
Phone: 
413.545.1243

 


Self-Management of Sleep among Older Adults Using Personal Monitoring: A Feasibility Study

PI: Raeann LeBlanc, PhD, DNP, AGPCNP-BC, CHPN

Co-I: Rebecca Spencer, PhD

Co-I: Jenna Marquard, PhD

Co-I: Cynthia Jacelon, PhD, RN-BC, CRRN, FGSA, FAAN

Co-I: Benjamin Marlin, PhD

Co-I: Anthony Paik, PhD

Dr. LeBlanc’s pilot project will determine if self-monitoring and a social network intervention improves sleep quality using an unobtrusive wearable personal sleep monitoring device (PSMD), and the usability of PSMDs among community-dwelling adults age 65 and above.

The central premise is that sleep quality and health outcomes (physical functioning, anxiety, depression, fatigue, sleep-disturbance, social role, pain interference, and pain intensity) can be improved in older adults by using a PSMD, a technology-based intervention, and a social network intervention, where data is shared among users. By demonstrating the effective use of PSMDs, the intention is to lay the groundwork to design and refine larger subsequent studies examining the use of PSMDs to improve self-management of sleep and health outcome measures through social network interventions.

This research is the first step in designing a novel social network approach to personal health monitoring among older adults. Expected outcomes for this feasibility study are the successful recruitment and retention of older adults to participate, use a PSMD, share data with social network members, influence positive self-management, and show health benefits. Long-term expected outcomes are that older adults who use PSMDs will have improved sleep quality and utilize social network data sharing to improve self-management. These outcomes will improve overall health and physical function, leading to better overall health self-management.

Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute of Nursing Research of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number P20NR016599. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official view of the National Institutes of Health.

 

Raeann LeBlanc

Clinical Assistant Professor

Campus Address: 
Skinner Hall 125
Phone: 
413.545.6630