New Course Proposals

The following new course proposals have been submitted to the Faculty Senate Office for review and approval and are listed here for faculty review and comment. Comments on any new course proposal should be submitted to Ernest May, secretary of the Faculty Senate, at senate@senate.umass.edu.

CAT 110, “Elementary Catalan I,” 3 credits; Instructor: Guillem Molla; This course is an introduction to Catalan for students with no prior knowledge of the language. Through a task-based, communicative approach, this course seeks to initiate students into the elements of reading, writing, listening, and speaking in Catalan. Prerequisites: None

CAT 120, “Elementary Catalan II,” 3 credits; Instructor: Guillem Molla; Through a task-based, communicative approach, this course is the continuation of Elementary Catalan I and seeks to continue on training students to achieve an elementary command of the elements of reading, writing, listening, and speaking in Catalan. Prerequisites: CAT 110 or demonstrated elementary knowledge of Catalan or an intermediate knowledge of another Romance language is required

CAT 311, “Advanced Intermediate Catalan,” 3 credits; Instructor: Guillem Molla; Advanced Intermediate Catalan course with emphasis on written and oral expression. Prerequisites: Intermediate knowledge of Catalan language or successful completion of CAT 246 or equivalent or professor consent

CAT 321, “Catalan Culture,” 2 credits; Instructor: Guillem Molla; Survey of modern Catalan culture, including its language, literature, art, music, and traditions. Prerequisites: None

CAT 378, “Catalan Phonetics,” 3 credits; Instructor: Meghan Armstrong; Comprehensive review of the pronunciation of Catalan. Fundamental principles of phonetic analysis with attention to practice and corrective exercises. Focus on the contrast between Catalan and English sound patterns. Prerequisites: CAT 246 or equivalent, or professor consent

CLASSICS 328, “World of the Etruscans,” 4 credits; Instructor: Anthony Tuck; This course examines the emergence and material culture of the Etruscan people from their roots in the Italic Iron Age (circa 1000 BC) through to its absorption into the Roman sphere (circa 300-200 BCE). Prerequisites: None

CLASSICS 329, “Celtic Archaeology,” 4 credits; Instructor: Anthony Tuck; This course considers the material evidence of human populations of Western Europe from the Neolithic through to the Late Antique period. Prerequisites: None

COMP-LIT 329, “Hispanic New York,” 4 credits; Instructor: Regina Galasso; Survey of the literature of New York by Hispanic writers and literary representations of New York in the Hispanic imaginary. Themes: crisis, immigration, urban development, community, tourism, exile, language, translation. Prerequisites: None

GREEK 460, “Euripides,” 3 credits; Instructor: Melissa Mueller, alternating with other Classics faculty; We will read at least one entire work of Euripides (e.g., the “Hippolytus”) in the original Greek, emphasizing large quantities of prepared reading as well as sight-translation and discussion of literary and cultural topics. Prerequisites: None required – Recommended (but not required) Prerequisites: Two third-year courses (or the equivalent) in ancient Greek

GREEK 465, “Sophocles,” 3 credits; Instructor: Melissa Mueller, alternating with other Classics faculty; We will read at least one entire work of Sophocles (e.g., the “Antigone”) in the original Greek, emphasizing large quantities of prepared reading as well as sight-translation and discussion of literary and cultural topics. Prerequisites: None required – Recommended (but not required) Prerequisites: Two third-year courses (or the equivalent) in ancient Greek

JUDAIC 364, “Cinema of the Holocaust,” 4 credits; Instructor: Olga Gershenson; Cinema today constitutes an important source of popular historical knowledge of the Holocaust. Fiction films in particular have come to occupy a central place in our understanding and memorialization of the Jewish catastrophe. Given their importance, this course will provide a cultural history of cinematic treatments of the Holocaust, trace major trends and changes in Holocaust representations, and raise questions concerning historical memory of the Holocaust in national cinemas. The main emphasis will be on narrative cinema, but several significant documentaries will also be considered. Prerequisites: None

PORTUG 470, “General View of Portuguese Linguistics,” 3 credits; Instructor: Luiz Amaral; This course offers an introduction to general notions of language and linguistics. In this class, students will learn the structural properties of the Portuguese language: phonology, prosody, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics. Prerequisites: PORTUG 240 “Intermediate Portuguese II”

SPANISH 356, “Spanish for Medical Professions,” 3 credits; Instructor: Patricia Gubitosi; SPANISH 356 is specifically designed to meet the needs of students interested in health care professions to increase fluency in the language through a variety of written and oral practices. Prerequisites: SPANISH 311

SPANISH 381, “Spanish in the United States,” 4 credits; Instructor: Meghan Armstrong; This course is designed to explore the many reasons why Spanish has become the most spoken language in the USA after English and examine the rise of Spanish-speaking communities across the US. Prerequisites: None

SPANISH 432, “From Book to Screen,” 4 credits; Instructor: Barbara Zecchi; This class will study Spanish literary works and their cinematic adaptations. It will address the fundamental differences between written words and visual image, measure the fidelity of the recreation and reflect upon the implications of ideology and gender for reinterpretation. Prerequisites: SPANISH 311