New Course Proposals

September 6, 2013

The following new course proposals have been submitted to the Faculty Senate Office for review and approval and are listed here for faculty review and comment. Comments on any new course proposal should be submitted to Ernest May, secretary of the Faculty Senate, at senate@senate.umass.edu.

BIOCHEM 576 “Biotechnology Process Engineering Laboratory” 4 credits; Instructors: Louis Roberts (BMB) and Susan Roberts (ChE); A comprehensive student-driven laboratory course in biotechnology process engineering focusing on the laboratory skills necessary to bring a product to the marketplace. Prerequisites: Completion of BIOCHEM 276 and 523 with a "C-" better in each class; instructor consent required.

CHEM-ENG 575 “Tissue Engineering” 3 credits; Instructor: Shelly Peyton; This course will introduce concepts of engineered tissue replacements and tissue model systems for basic research. We will discuss the growing need for tissue replacements, in vivo cell-matrix relationships in biology, and how we can engineer biomaterials (both bioinert and bioinstructive) to act as cell scaffolds. Prerequisites: BIOLOGY 100 or CHEM-ENG 290B (or equivalent)

CHEM-ENG 576 “Biotechnology Process Engineering Laboratory” 4 credits; Instructors: Susan Roberts (ChE) and Louis Roberts (BMB); A comprehensive student-driven laboratory course in biotechnology process engineering focusing on the laboratory skills necessary to bring a product to the marketplace. Prerequisites: Successful completion of CHEM-ENG 320, 325, 330, 333, 338 and 361; instructor consent required.

COMM 315 “Critical Folklore Studies” 3 credits; Instructor: Stephen Olbrys Gencarella; This course introduces students to the relationship between conventional and critical folklore studies and an appreciation of applied folklore studies, in preparation to work with and represent others through research. Prerequisites: COMM 125

COMM 319 “Health Communication” 3 credits; Instructor: Cynthia Suopis; This course addresses health issues from interpersonal, mass media and critical communication perspectives. Communication theories will be applied to a variety of health issues including the physician-patient relationship, the design of health media campaigns, the pharmaceutical industry, and the influence of health promotion on human behavior. Intercultural and organizational health communication will also be discussed. Prerequisites: None

COMM 332 “Convergent Media and Activism” 3 credits; Instructor: Martha Fuentes Bautista; This course explores the relationship between digital media, politics and democracy, examining the social and technical history of online activist projects in different societies around the world. Prerequisites: COMM 122, which is an entry-level course for COMM majors interested in the “Media, Technology and Society” subject area. This course also serves the curricular needs of the IT minor so IT minors will be added by permission of the instructor.

COMM 343 “Women in Cinemas of the African Diaspora” 3 hours of course credit; Instructor: Demetria Rougeauz Shabazz; This course focuses on women, identify, and Afrocentric film practices. It introduces students to the evolution of African women in all aspects of the cinema as image and as image-makers. Prerequisites: None

COMM 415 “Humor and Public Culture” 3 credits; Instructor: Stephen Olbrys Gencarella; This course examines humor as a fundamental aspect of social, ethical, and political life; it looks closely at the various roles humor plays in communication, both live and in media. Prerequisites: COMM 125

COMM 435 “Latina/o Media & Cultural Production” 4 credits; Instructor: Mari Castañeda; This course examines the historical development and current transformation of Latina/o media and cultural production within the U.S. and Latin America. A Community Service Learning (CSL) component is also included. Prerequisites: None

COMM 437 “Global Communication Theories & Issues” 3 credits; Instructor: Henry Geddes; Lecture, discussion. Explores theoretical frameworks for understanding the technological, institutional and cultural dimensions of global communication defined by growing media concentration and proliferation of regional and social media. (Limit 25) Prerequisites: COMM 121, or permission from instructor

CMPSCI 345 “Practice and Applications of Data Management” 3 credits; Instructor: Alexandra Meliou; computing has become data-driven, and databases are now at the heart of commercial applications. The purpose of this course is to provide a comprehensive introduction to the use of data management systems within the context of various applications. Some of the covered topics include application-driven database design, schema refinement, implementation of basic transactions, data on the web, and data visualization. Prerequisites: CMPSCI 187, grade C or greater

EDUC 503 “Sheltered English Immersion: Access to Academics for PK-12 English Language Learners” 3 credits; Instructors: Barbara Hruska, Margaret Gebhard; This course introduces and assesses the 11 Sheltered English Immersion (SEI) Standards fulfilling the SEI Endorsement requirement for teacher licensure in Massachusetts. Course content prepares PK-12 preservice teachers with the theoretical, cultural, political, linguistic, and instructional tools for effectively promoting the language development of English language learners. Prerequisites: Acceptance into an approved teacher licensure program and fulfillment of program admissions prerequisites.

EDUC 621B “Race, Class, and Gender in Higher Education” 3 credits; Instructor Benita J. Barnes; The goal of this course is to explore the multiple sociocultural factors that influence the success of students and ask fundamental questions about the relationship between higher education and society. Why do some students seem to learn more and “get further ahead” than others? Why do some students get more involved in co-curricular activities than others? What factors shape how institutions are run and organized, who attends four-year vs. two-year institutions, and what curricular materials are taught?
Prerequisites: None

EDUC 674A “International Higher Education Policy” 3 credits; Instructor: Ryan Wells; This seminar explores the increasingly global nature of higher education with a focus on contemporary trends, issues, and dynamics in higher education, and the policies that attempt to address them.

EDUC 767 “Researching New Literacies: Multimodal Media Production and Social Justice” 3 credits; Instructor: Dr. K.C. Nat Turner; This seminar is for students interested in how to use multimodal media production to engage youth in literacy practices they will need for participating in future academic, civic and social contexts.

GERMAN 609 “Debates and Issues in Modern German History” 4 credits; Instructor: Andrew Donson; Introduction to the various interpretations of Germany’s past from 1870 to the present. Emphasis on controversies and competing historical approaches. Prerequisites: None

HISTORY 609 “Debates and Issues in Modern German History” 4 credits; Instructor: Andrew Donson; Introduction to the various interpretations of Germany’s past from 1870 to the present. Emphasis on controversies and competing historical approaches. Prerequisites: None

NATSCI 289H “Integrated Scientific Communications” 4 credits; Instructors: Scott Auerbach and R. Zimmermann; iCons 2 (NATSCI 289H) engages students in written and oral communication skill-building, emphasizing the different demands placed on scientists when we interact with scientists from our own discipline, other disciplines, younger students, and with the general public. For most departments in the College of Natural Sciences and College of Engineering, iCons 2 fulfills the Junior Year Writing requirement. Students develop the ability to create, articulate and write logical arguments to scientists and non-scientists. This necessitates learning to listen and speak well with scientists from other fields, and to give and receive constructive criticism. Work on theme-based projects is produced both individually and in teams, helping each student build their own skill set while building on progress from iCons 1. Prerequisites: Completion of NATSCI 189H (iCons 1) with a grade of C or better

PSYCH 662 “Improving Group Relations” 3 credits; Instructor: Dr. Linda Tropp; This course examines social psychological research on strategies to improve relations between groups, and potential strengths and weaknesses depending on the relative statuses and conflict histories of the groups involved.

SPANISH 324 “Introduction to Latino/a Literature” 3 credits; Instructor: Alberto Ameal-Perez; Introduction to the literature of US Latinas/os. Includes poetry, prose fiction, essay, and film production in Spanish. Emphasis on literary currents and their relation to history and culture. Prerequisites: SPANISH 311