Electron Microscopy Center

  • The staff of the W. M. Keck Electron Microscopy Center at UMass Amherst with the JEOL 2200fs field emission – energy-filtered transmission electron microscope and its control station. From left are Alexander E. Ribbe, director of the center, and senior electron microscopists Dale A. Callaham and Louis E. Raboin.
  • This high resolution scanning electron microscope image of a carbon nanotube mesh was taken with the FEI Magellan 400 HR-SEM. The smallest detectable diameter is 2 nm. 1 nm (nanometer) is a billionth of a meter.
  • This is the control station for the JEOL 2200fs field emission – energy-filtered transmission electron microscope.
  • Powering the UMass Amherst electron microscopy center are the JEOL 2200fs field emission – energy-filtered transmission electron microscope, left, and the FEI Magellan 400 ultra-high-resolution scanning electron microscope.
  • This is a high angle annular dark field image (HAADF) image of a polymer loaded with cadmium-selenide and iron-oxide nanoparticles taken with the scanning transmission detector in the FEI Magellan 400 high resolution scanning electron microscope. The length of structure is about 500 nm.
  • This box is part of the control station for the JEOL 2200fs electron microscope.
  • This high-resolution gold lattice image at 1 million times magnification was acquired with the new JEOL 2200FS being installed at the UMass Amherst electron microscopy center. Inset in the image is a calculated diffraction pattern (Fourier Transform) of the picture demonstrating up to 0.1 nm lattice resolution.
  • This is an Oxford X-Max 80T energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer. Both electron microscopes at the UMass center have a version of this.

    The W.M. Keck Electron Microscopy Center at the University of Massachusetts Amherst is consolidating two sophisticated electron microscopes and a team of expert operators to provide centralized services for all departments on campus.