Aelion to Serve on Federal Health and Human Services Panel

Marjorie Aelion
Marjorie Aelion

Marjorie Aelion, dean of the School of Public Health and Health Sciences, has been invited to serve on a federal subcommittee advising the secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Aelion joins the Stakeholder Engagement Subcommittee of the Secretary’s Advisory Committee, a federal advisory committee composed of national subject matter experts providing recommendations for developing and implementing the Healthy People 2030 initiative, the next iteration of the nation’s health promotion and disease prevention objectives.

As articulated on its web page, Healthy People provides science-based, 10-year national objectives for improving the health of all Americans.

For three decades, Healthy People has established benchmarks and monitored progress over time in order to encourage collaborations across communities and sectors; empower individuals toward making informed health decisions; and measure the impact of prevention activities.

“Being part of the Healthy People Initiative is an honor,” said Aelion. “This is an impactful, national program that many people recognize. It is a long-term and forward-thinking approach to public health and prevention.”

The Stakeholder Engagement Subcommittee has been charged with developing an approach to increase awareness and utilization of Healthy People, delineate the primary and secondary audiences for Healthy People 2030, and consider the past use and impact of the Healthy People initiative.

The approximately 18-person subcommittee includes representatives from academia, the American Public Health Association, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, nonprofit health care organizations and health care providers.

“It is always exciting to brainstorm with national experts in the field from different types of organizations, seeing how each person reflects his or her perspective of health promotion and disease prevention,” Aelion said.