Fall 2014:

UMass Amherst

ANTHRO 220: Introduction to Native American Studies
Denene De Quintal
This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Native Studies. Course content includes the indigenous peoples and cultures of North, South and Central America as well as contemporary cultural expressions, representations, political issues, repatriation and active persistence throughout the ongoing colonization of their homelands.
4 credits
TU TH 10:00AM 11:15AM
Satisfies Diversity Area

ANTHRO 270: North American Indians
Jean Forward
Survey of the indigenous people of America north of Mexico; their regional variations and adaptations, their relationship to each other, and the changes taking place in their lifeways. (Gen.Ed. SB, U)
4 credits
TU TH 2:30PM 3:45PM
Integrated Sciences building, S240
Satisfies Diversity Area

ANTHRO 297FW: Native American Foodways and Plant Medicines
Howard Kimewon
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to Native American traditional foods and ways of preparing them, and some basic uses of plants used as medicines by Native Americans. The course will also examine ways that Native Peoples are working to protect and revitalize their foodways in the present.
3 credits
MW 9:05-10:20
Satisfies Contemporary Issues, Diversity and Cultural Expressions Area

ANTHRO 297LC: Ojibwe Language and Culture 1
Howard Kimewon
The course provides an introduction to Ojibwe language and culture. Ojibwe is a Native American language spoken by the Anishinaabe people. Contemporary Anishinabe communities live in several states and Canadian provinces, including Minnesota, North Dakota, Michigan, Wisconsin, Montana, Ontario, and Manitoba. Ojibwe is part of the Algonquian language family and is closely related to languages spoken by tribal communities in the New England region. This course is for students who have no previous knowledge of Ojibwe or Native American history and culture.
3 credits
MWF 11:15-12:05
Satisfies Diversity Area and Cultural Expressions Area

HIST 170: Indigenous Peoples of North America
Alice Nash
The diverse histories of indigenous peoples in North America from their origins to the present. Focus on indigenous perspectives, examining social, economic, and political issues experienced by indigenous peoples. Emphasis on diversity, continuity, change, and self-determination. (Gen.Ed. HS, U)
4 credits
M W 12:20PM 1:10PM
Satisfies Diversity Area

Stockbridge School 297C: ST-Traditional Herbal Medicine Systems I
Nazim Mamedov
An examination of indigenous medicinal systems from around the world (including Ayurvedic, Chinese, African, Middle Eastern, European, Central Asian, Native American and Amazonian). Students will be exposed to the use of medicinal plants in different cultures around the globe. Companion course to STOCKSCH 297F. These courses can be taken in any sequence.
1 credit
W 4:00PM 5:15PM
Satisfies Diversity Area

ENG 341: Autobiography Studies: American Indian Autobiography
Laura M. Furlan
3 credits
MW 2:30-3:45
Satisfies Diversity Area.

ENG 791L: Contemporary American Indian Fiction
Laura M.Furlan
3 credits
W 4:00-6:00
Satisfies the Contemporary Issues Area or the Cultural Expressions Area.

Afro-American Studies 296D: Independent Study: Native Film
Jena McLaurin
An introduction to Indigenous-created feature films, this course will combine the history of Native Americans and colonization in the United States with a film studies approach in order to give students a more complete understanding of the movies and short films the course will cover.
2 credits
Every other Monday beginning Monday, September 8th, 2014
Satisfies Cultural Expressions Area and Contemporary Issues Area.

Linguistics 391B: S-Indigenous Languages of North America
Margaret Speas
An introduction to North American language families with in-depth study of the unique grammatical properties of several languages within each family, and efforts of contemporary speakers to preserve, revitalize or restore their languages.
3 credits
MWF 10:10-11:00
Satisfies Diversity Area and Cultural Expressions Area.

Geosciences 692C: S-New Paradigms in Conservation
Stanley Stevens
This graduate course focuses on the sea-change in international thinking about national parks and other protected areas since 2000. Reacting against both "protectionist" conservation based on exclusionary protected areas and early "community based" conservation and integrated development projects, the new paradigm endorsed by IUCN and the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity affirms rights-based conservation, greater diversity in protected area goals and governance arrangements, and recognition of Indigenous peoples' and local communities' conservation contributions, rights, and responsibilities. The resulting shift in policy and practice has profound, worldwide ramifications for biological and cultural diversity, conservation, and social justice. This course explores changing conceptualizations of protected areas, key policy shifts, and case studies of new approaches.
3 credits
TH 4:00PM 7:00PM
Satisfies Contemporary Issues Area.

POLSCI 397E: Indigenous Rights and Movements in Latin America
Angelica Bernal
This course is an introduction to the contemporary indigenous struggle in Latin America.  We will examine the history and politics of this struggle as well as deal with theoretical issues and conflicts raised by indigenous reforms and activism.
3 credits
M W 2:30-3:45
Satisfies Contemporary Issues Area and Diversity Area

Special Course: Independent Study, Abroad
Ecological Literacy through Learning Gardens and Amazonian Dark Earth in the Peruvian High Amazon
Frederique Apffel-Marglin
July 5th to July 31st, 2015
Sign up for Independent Study with Jean Forward, Anthropology Dept.
Satisfies Contemporary Issues Area, Diversity Area, and Cultural Expressions Area.

Amherst College

ENG 274: Native American Literature
Lisa Brooks
(Offered as ENGL 274 and  AMST 274.)  In 2013, Amherst College acquired one of the most comprehensive collections of Native American writing in the world–nearly 1,500 books ranging from contemporary fiction and poetry to sermons, political tracts, and tribal histories from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Through this course, we will actively engage the literature of this collection, researching Native American intellectual traditions, regional contexts, political debates, creative adaptation, and movements toward decolonization. Students will have the opportunity to make an original contribution to a digital archive and interact with visiting authors. We will begin with oral traditions and the 1772 sermon published by Mohegan author Samson Occom and end with a novel published in 2014.
4 credits
TTH 01:00PM-02:20PM
Faye 113
Satisfies Contemporary Issues Area and Cultural Expressions Area.

American Studies 111: Global Valley
Lisa Brooks
Drawing on a wide range of primary materials, and taking advantage of the ease of visiting the sites of many of the topics we study, this course offers an introduction to American Studies through an exploration of the Connecticut River Valley that stresses both the fascination of detailed local history and the economic, political, social, and cultural networks that tie this place to the world. Topics may include conflicts and accommodations between Native peoples and English settlers; changing uses of land and resources; 17th century witchcraft trials; the American Revolution and Shays rebellion; religious revivalism of the Great Awakening; abolitionist and other 19th century reform movements; tourism and the scenic including Thomas Cole’s famous painting of the oxbow; immigration, industrialization and deindustrialization, especially in the cities of Holyoke and Springfield; educational institutions and innovations; the cold war, the reach of the “military industrial complex” into local educational institutions, and “the bunker”; the sanctuary movement; feminist and gay activism; present environmental, mass incarceration, and other social equity issues; and of course, Emily Dickinson's poetry. 
4 credits
TTH 10:00AM-11:20AM
Satisfies Diversity Area.

AMERICAN STUDIES 240: Rethinking Pocahontas
Kiara Vigil
From Longfellow’s Hiawatha and D.H. Lawrence’s Studies in Classic American Literature to Disney’s Pocahontas and James Cameron’s Avatar, representations of the indigenous as “Other” have greatly shaped cultural production in America as vehicles for defining the nation and the self. This interdisciplinary course introduces students to the broad field of Native American Studies, engaging a range of texts from law to policy to history and literature as well as music and aesthetics. Film and literary texts in particular will provide primary grounding for our inquiries. By keeping popular culture, representation, and the nature of historical narrative in mind, we will consider the often mutually constitutive relationship between American identity and Indian identity as we pose the following questions: How have imaginings of a national space and national culture by Americans been shaped by a history marked by conquest and reconciliation with indigenous peoples? And, how has the creation of a national American literary tradition often defined itself as both apart from and yet indebted to Native American cultural traditions? This course also considers how categories like race, class, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and religion have contributed to discussions of citizenship and identity, and changed over time with particular attention to specific Native American individuals and tribal nations. Students will be able to design their own final research project that may focus on either a historically contingent or contemporary issue related to Native American people in the United States.
4 credits
TTH 10:00AM-11:20AM
MORG 110
Satisfies Cultural Expressions Area.

Mount Holyoke College

SPANISH 240VC: Visualizing Indigenous Cultures
Tara Daly
Spain and Latin America may be oceans apart but they have been co-constructed as cultural spaces since the colonial period. In this class, we will trace the way indigenous peoples of the Americas were seen and represented by some of the earliest colonial-era writers, like Cristobal Colon and Inca Garcilaso de la Vega. We will then move up to the 19th century to explore European travel writers' accounts of indigenous groups their representation in visual art, particularly landscape painting. In the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, we will interrogate Indigenismo and indigenous communities' use of new media - photography and video-- as tools of self-representation. The course will be conducted in Spanish.
4 credits
MW 11:00AM-12:15PM
Art 219
Satisfies Cultural Expressions Area.

Smith College

History 260/Latin American Studies 260: Colonial Latin America 1492-1821 
Ann Zulawski
The development of Latin American society during the period of Spanish and Portuguese rule. Social and cultural change in Native American societies as a result of colonialism. The contributions of Africans, Europeans and Native Americans to the new multi-ethnic societies that emerged during the three centuries of colonization and resistance. The study of sexuality, gender ideologies and the experiences of women are integral to the course and essential for understanding political power and cultural change in colonial Latin America.
4 credits
TTh 10:30-11:50
Satisfies Diversity Area.

Spring 2014:

UMass Amherst

 

ANTH 370: Contemorary Issues of North American Indians: Focus on the Northeast
Study and application of anthropological theory to contemporary problems of North American Indians in the Northeast, including an analysis of their environmental, economic, political, social, and religious variables involved in gaining a holistic perspective of contemporary indigenous problems.  This course is designed to inform students of the current issues facing the Native American Indians in the Northeast of North America through presentations by five guest speakers, all Northeast Native American Indians. (Gen.Ed. U)
3 credits
Jean Forward
Thursday 2:30-5:00
Boyden 269
Required course for undergraduate Certificate in Native American Indian Studies at UMass Amherst and 5 College Native American Indian Studies Certificate.

ANTH 670: Contemorary Issues of North American Indians: Focus on the Northeast
Study and application of anthropological theory to contemporary problems of North American Indians in the Northeast, including an analysis of their environmental, economic, political, social, and religious variables involved in gaining a holistic perspective of contemporary indigenous problems. This course is designed to inform students of the current issues facing the Native American Indians in the Northeast of North America through presentations by five guest speakers, all Northeast Native American Indians.
3 credits
Jean Forward
Thursday 2:30-5:00
Boyden 269
Required course for graduate Certificate in Native American Indian Studies at UMass Amherst.

GEO-SCI 450 Section 01: Indigenous Peoples and Conservation
Brief description: Indigenous peoples' contributions to biodiversity conservation, issues raised by establishment of national parks on indigenous lands, and approaches linking conservation and rights.  Global emphasis, with special attention to the Americas.
Class number 58296
3 credits
Stan Stevents
Tu-Th 2:30 PM-3:45 PM
Hasbrouck Addition Room 236
Satisfies Contemporary Issues Area.

HIST 170: Indigenous Peoples of North America
The diverse histories of indigenous peoples in North America from their origins to the present. Focus on indigenous perspectives, examining social, economic, and political issues experienced by indigenous peoples. Emphasis on diversity, continuity, change, and self-determination. (Gen.Ed. HS, U)
Schedule #: 58053
4 credits
Alice Nash
MW 11:15 – 12:05 Lecture
Available labs:
HIST 170 01AA DIS – F 9:05 – 9:55
HIST 170 01AB DIS – F 10:10 – 11:00
HIST 170 01AC DIS – F 12:20 – 1:10
HIST 170 01AC DIS – F 10:10 – 11:00
HIST 170 01AE DIS – F 11:15 – 12:05
HIST 170 01AF DIS – F 1:25 – 2:15
HIST 170 01AG DIS – F 9:05 – 9:55
HIST 170 01AJ DIS – F 10:10 – 11:00
HIST 170 01AK DIS – F 12:20 – 1:10
Satisfies Diversity Area.

HIST 493P/693P– Indigenous Peoples and the United Nations
Seminar Description: In 1923, Deskaheh, a Chief of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois Confederacy), traveled to Geneva, Switzerland, to tell the League of Nations about the struggles of his people to live under their own laws within the borders of the U.S.A.  Although he was not allowed to make a formal presentation, he spoke to many people during his visit and planted a seed that was nurtured by subsequent generations.  On September 13, 2007 the United Nations General Assembly adopted the U.N. Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
This interdisciplinary seminar takes its framework from the Declaration, exploring relevant issues in-depth each week through readings, discussions, and guest speakers.  Advanced undergraduates should expect to keep up with a heavy reading schedule, co-facilitate one of the weekly meetings, write a series of short papers and produce a substantive 12-15 page research paper.  Graduate students will submit a 300-word summary of the readings before class each week, write a 7-8 page literature review, and produce a 20-25 page paper that might be presented at a conference or published in an academic journal.
NOTE: The Twelfth Session of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues will meet in New York City from May 20-31, 2014.  We can make arrangements for a group from UMass to attend.

Alice Nash
W 2:30 – 5:00
Satisfies Contemporary Issues Area.

ENG 116: Introduction to Native American Literature
3 credits
Laura Furlan
TTh 11:15 – 12:30
Satisfies Contemporary Issues Area and Cultural Expressions Area.

COMPLIT 393D: S-Native American Narrative Art
This course provides an introductory survey of Native American Indian artistic and pictorial traditions that were intimately bound to stories and histories of nations and families, religious and mythological traditions, autobiographical narratives or aesthetic and philosophical reflections. More than mnemonic devices, these visual traditions are inseparable from culture and performance, community and nation, human life and the physical world. The visual and tactile media that will be encompassed in the course include pictorial manuscripts, ceramics, bead and shell work, and textiles. Visual and verbal or artistic, cultural, aesthetic and literary elements that were originally unified have usually been divided into printed texts and reproduced images identified with different disciplines or are as of study. The course will be interdisciplinary, with each unit including readings of narratives or texts, analysis of visual materials, and will also include readings on aesthetics and translation, as well as cultural and literary criticism as appropriate.
Schedule #:  50640
3 credits
N. C. Christopher Couch
Tu 4:00 – 7:00
Satisfies Cultural Expressions Area.

Smith College


AMS 229: Native New England
In this course we will interrogate the space we now know as “New England” as a land with histories, peoples, and life ways that predate and exceed the former English colonies and the lineaments of the current United States. We will devote our semester to learning about the cultural distinctiveness of the Native peoples of New England—for example, the Mohawk, Mohegan, Abenaki, Wampanoag and Shaghticoke—and to understanding the historical processes of encounter, adaptation, resistance, and renewal that have characterized Native life in the area for centuries. We will explore histories of the pre- and post- “contact” period through the perspectives of various Native communities, and discuss the legacies of these histories for Native New England today.
Christen Mucher
4 credits
TTh 1:00 – 2:30
Seelye 107
Satisfies Diversity Area.

ANT 269: Indigenous Cultures and the State in Mesoamerica
This course is a general introduction to the relationship between indigenous societies and the state in Mesoamerica. Taking a broad historical perspective, we will explore the rise of native state-level societies, the transformations that marked the process of European colonization, and of the relationship of local indigenous communities to post-colonial states and trans-national social movements. Texts used in the course will place special emphasis on continuities and changes in language, social organization, cosmology and identity that have marked the historical experience of native groups in the region.
Fernando Armstrong-Fumero
4 credits
MW 2:40 – 4:00
Seelye 313
Satisfies Diversity Area.

HIST 270 Section 2 COLQ: Aspects of American History
Topics course. The captivity of Europeans and European Americans -- especially women -- by Native Americans has been a persistent theme in mainstream literary and popular culture since early colonial times. This course examines several cases of such captivity in historical and cross- cultural context as well as some of the many more instances in which Native Americans and other non-Europeans were captives. Topics include captivity in pre-colonial indigenous societies, the purposes and meanings of captivity for captors and captives, the uses of captivity narratives as historical evidence, captivity and cultural and ethnic identity, captivity and gender, Native-American-African American relations and the colonial-era slave trade in Native Americans.
Topic: Cross-Cultural Captivity in North America, 1500-1860.
Schedule #: 40478-S14
4 credits
Neal Salisbury
TTh 3:00 – 4:50
Hatfield 202
Satisfies Diversity Area.

Mount Holyoke

 

HIST 373: Cartography & Exploration in North America
'This course examines the history of mapping: what maps show, and what places the practice of cartography tends to erase, distort, or conceal. It focuses on the landscapes of early North America, where the representation and use of space was hotly contested by Natives, European settlers, and Africans. The course's topics include indigenous mapping traditions and concepts of sacred space, European navigational strategies during the 'Age of Discovery,' early urban planning, and scientific/military depictions. The course will teach strategies for employing maps as primary sources, and ways of understanding the historical and ideological circumstances of their production and circulation.'
This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Schedule #: 86885
4 credits
Christine DeLucia
W 1:15 – 4:05
Skinner Hall 210
Satisfies Cultural Expression and Diversity Areas.

HIST 234: The Atlantic World
Early Americans inhabited an interconnected world through which people, beliefs, and objects circulated. This course explores the 'Atlantic World' as both a place and a concept: an ocean surrounded by diverse communities and empires, and an imagined space of shared or competing affiliations. Moving from the fifteenth to the nineteenth century, it examines ecological, cultural, political, economic, intellectual, and religious exchanges among Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans. It will introduce both conceptual dimensions of this Atlantic paradigm and case studies that investigate its human subtleties, with the goal of examining early American history through a transnational lens.'
Schedule #: 86871
4 credits
Christine DeLucia
TTh 10:00 – 11:15
Skinner Hall 210
Satisfies Diversity Area.

Amherst College
No current classes available for certificate credit.

Hampshire
No current classes available for certificate credit.

 

Fall 2013:

University of Massachusetts Amherst:

Anthro 220: Introduction to Native American Studies
Rae Gould. Tues - Thur., 11:15am-12:30pm, DuBois Library, 702

This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Native Studies. Course content includes the indigenous peoples and cultures of North, South and Central America as well as contemporary cultural expressions, representations, political issues, repatriation and active persistence throughout the ongoing colonization of their homelands.

Diversity Area

Anthro 270: North American Indians
Jean Forward. TuTh 2:30, Gen.Ed. 4 credits

Survey of the indigenous people of America north of Mexico; their regional variations and adaptations, their relationship to each other, and the changes taking place in their lifeways. (Gen.Ed. SB, U)

Diversity Area

Anthro 397MG: ST: Languages of Mexico & Guatamala

Emiliana Cruz. TuTh 4:00pm-5:15pm

Cultural Expressions Area

Anthro 697TR: Interpretive Trails
Sonya Atalay. W 9:05am-12:05pm

This course will be an examination of cultural heritage tourism with an emphasis on interpretive trails. We will look locally, nationally, and internationally to gain an overview of the scale, scope and organization of interpretive trail planning; emphasis on development of cultural and heritage resources of tourism; and identification of issues related to the economic, technological and political aspects of interpretive trail tourism. Some of the complex issues we will examine include: What are the collaborative processes involved in choosing sites for inclusion? Indigenous communities often have holistic views of landscapes that cannot easily divide natural, cultural and spiritual landscapes. How these multiple aspects of a place best presented to diverse public audiences? Who decides which communities are included on multi-cultural trails, and how do diverse groups work together in developing and caring for trails, particularly when cultural concepts of “care” vary dramatically and can sometimes conflict? Some of the most significant challenges in cultural heritage tourism, and interpretive trails in particular, center around the decision to even identify a site. How do archaeologists and public historians work with communities to protect and preserve sites once their locations are publically identified?
Format: The course will follow a seminar format in which we read and discuss weekly readings. We will review case studies but will also examine a local case-study with the development of an interpretive trail currently in development in Massachusetts.

Contemporary Issues Area

History 170: Indigenous Peoples of North America
Alice Nash, TuTh 4:00 pm-4:50pm, Thompson Hall room 106

The diverse histories of indigenous peoples in North America from their origins to the present. Focus on indigenous perspectives, examining social, economic, and political issues experienced by indigenous peoples. Emphasis on diversity, continuity, change, and self-determination.

Diversity Area

Theater 130: Contemporary Playwrights Of Color
Priscilla Page TU TH 2:30pm-3:45pm

Theater movements of Blacks, Latinos, Asians, and Native Americans, and the body of literature by contemporary playwrights of color within a historical context.

Cultural Expressions Area

Afroam 397B: ST-Native Americans/African Americans
John Bracey, Wednesdays 7:00pm-9:30pm, New African House room 311

Explores numerous levels and terms of the encounter between Native Americans and Blacks, including native tribal identity, Black identity, famous people of mixed ancestry, contested identities, Native Americans in jazz and pop music. Native and Black cultural traditions in intermarriage, Native Americans as slaves, slavery and freedmen, "free colored" communities, decoding historical documents, tribal legacy assertions, "triracials," and the impact of mixed ancestry on both Black and native communities.

Diversity Area

AfroAm 496: Independent Study: Topic: Native Film
Jena McLaurin, Every other Monday starting September 16, 6:30 pm, Josephine White Eagle Cultural Center in Chadbourne Dorm (ground level)

This 2 credit course will provide students with a general overview of how Native people have been depicted in films as well as how Native people have challenged these depictions with their own film representations.  The course is centered around six film screenings followed by a discussion of each movie.  By the end of the course, students will have addressed questions such as: Why were “cowboy and Indian” movies so popular?  How are contemporary Native issues represented in film?  What are Native American Indian stereotypes, and how do we challenge them?

Cultural Expressions Area  and Contemporary Issues Area

AfroAm 496: Independent Study: Topic: Native Music
Jon G. Hill, Day and Time TBA, Josephine White Eagle Cultural Center in Chadbourne Dorm (ground level)

Cultural Expressions Area

Geosciences 497PA: Indigenous Peoples and Protected Areas
Stan Stevens. Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11:15am-12:30pm, Hasbrouck 236

Development and implementation of rights-based conservation and “new paradigm” protected area policy by Indigenous peoples, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), state parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), and NGOs.  Re-conceptualizations of protected area goals and governance, promotion of good governance and rights recognition, and political ecology critiques of “protection paradigm,” community-based conservation, and integrated conservation and development approaches.  Analysis of experience in diverse parts of the world with new approaches, emphasizing Indigenous peoples and community conserved areas (ICCAs) and shared governance arrangements.  Current initiatives by IUCN, CBD, UN human rights monitoring mechanism, the Global Environment Facility, the ICCA Consortium, Indigenous peoples and Indigenous peoples’ networks, and prominent conservation NGOs.

Contemporary Issues Area

Education 597R: ST-Leadership in Multicultural Tutoring
Robert Maloy, Tuesdays 4:00pm-6:30pm, Furcolo Hall room 128

Contemporary Issues Area

Stockbridge School 297C: ST-Traditional Herbal Medicine Systems I
Nazim Mamedov W 4:40PM 5:30PM

An examination of indigenous medicinal systems from around the world (including Ayurvedic, Chinese, African, Middle Eastern, European, Central Asian, Native American and Amazonian). Students will be exposed to the use of medicinal plants in different cultures around the globe. Companion course to PLSOILIN 297D. These courses can be taken in any sequence.

Diversity Area

Linguistics 391B: S-Indigenous Languages of North America
Staff TBA, TuTh 11:15am-12:30pm

Cultural Expressions Area

 

Amherst College:

American Studies 280/English 273: When Corn Mother Meets
Professors Brooks and Vigil. Tuesdays 1:00pm-3:20pm

(Offered as AMST 280 and ENGL 273.)  In Penobscot author Joseph Nicolar’s 1893 narrative, the Corn Mother proclaims, “I am young in age and I am tender, yet my strength is great and I shall be felt all over the world, because I owe my existence to the beautiful plant of the earth.” In contrast, according to one Iowa farmer, from the 2007 documentary “King Corn,” “We aren’t growing quality. We’re growing crap.” This course aims to unpack depictions like these in order to probe the ways that corn has changed in its significance within the Americas. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, students will be introduced to critical theories and methodologies from American Studies as they study corn’s shifting role, across distinct times and places, as a nourishing provider, cultural transformer, commodity, icon, and symbol.
Beginning with the earliest travels of corn and her stories in the Americas, students will learn about the rich histories, traditions, narratives, and uses of “maize” from indigenous communities and nations, as well as its subsequent proliferation and adaptation throughout the world. In addition to literary and historical sources students will engage with a wide variety of texts (from material culture to popular entertainment, public policy and genetics) in order to deepen their understanding of cultural, political, environmental, and economic changes that have characterized life in the Americas.
Limited to 25 students. 

Diversity Area and Cultural Expressions

American Studies 111: Global Valley
Professors Brooks and K. Sanchez-Eppler. TTH 10:00AM-11:20AM

Drawing on a wide range of primary materials, and taking advantage of the ease of visiting the sites of many of the topics we study, this course offers an introduction to American Studies through an exploration of the Connecticut River Valley that stresses both the fascination of detailed local history and the economic, political, social, and cultural networks that tie this place to the world. Topics may include conflicts and accommodations between Native peoples and English settlers; changing uses of land and resources; 17th century witchcraft trials; the American Revolution and Shays rebellion; religious revivalism of the Great Awakening; abolitionist and other 19th century reform movements; tourism and the scenic including Thomas Cole’s famous painting of the oxbow; immigration, industrialization and deindustrialization, especially in the cities of Holyoke and Springfield; educational institutions and innovations; the cold war, the reach of the “military industrial complex” into local educational institutions, and “the bunker”; the sanctuary movement; feminist and gay activism; present environmental, mass incarceration, and other social equity issues; and of course, Emily Dickinson's poetry. 
Limited to 20 students per section. 

Diversity Area

American Studies 240: Rethinking Pocahontas
Professor Vigil. TTH 10:00AM-11:20AM

From Longfellow’s Hiawatha and D.H. Lawrence’s Studies in Classic American Literature to Disney’s Pocahontas and James Cameron’s Avatar, representations of the indigenous as “Other” have greatly shaped cultural production in America as vehicles for defining the nation and the self. This interdisciplinary course introduces students to the broad field of Native American Studies, engaging a range of texts from law to policy to history and literature as well as music and aesthetics. Film and literary texts in particular will provide primary grounding for our inquiries. By keeping popular culture, representation, and the nature of historical narrative in mind, we will consider the often mutually constitutive relationship between American identity and Indian identity as we pose the following questions: How have imaginings of a national space and national culture by Americans been shaped by a history marked by conquest and reconciliation with indigenous peoples? And, how has the creation of a national American literary tradition often defined itself as both apart from and yet indebted to Native American cultural traditions? This course also considers how categories like race, class, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and religion have contributed to discussions of citizenship and identity, and changed over time with particular attention to specific Native American individuals and tribal nations. Students will be able to design their own final research project that may focus on either a historically contingent or contemporary issue related to Native American people in the United States.
Limited to 20 students. 

Cultural Expressions Area

 

Hampshire College:

Critical Social Inquiry 0129: Belonging in School
Kristen Luschen 10:30AM-11:50AM T,TH

Large numbers of students, particularly Latino, African American, and Native American students, disengage from school every year. Often this is in the form of "dropping out." However, there also is clear evidence that social policies as well school policies and practices work to push these students out of schools or exclude them all together. This course will examine the conditions of schooling that work to support students' formal and informal disengagement with school. We will explore what schools and their community partners can do to reengage students in schooling. We will explore research and current models of schooling that address the cultivation of a sense of belonging and community in schools. In particular, we will examine programs and schools that forefront community engagement, dialogue, racial justice, and student participation.

Contemporary Issues Area

Critical Social Inquiry 0134: Andean Lives
Michelle Bigenho 01:00PM-02:20PM M,W

Anthropologists, as well as travelers, conquerors, priests, journalists, novelists, and natives have constructed numerous accounts through which the Andean region has been imagined. These imaginings seem to vary as widely as the diversity of their authors: as a place steeped in highland indigenous traditions; as the idealized place of the Inca Empire; as a romanticized rural place of self-organized communities where an ethos of collective action outweighs that of individual interest; as the original source of the coca leaf that has ritual significance throughout the region; as the birthplace of a Maoist guerrilla movement in the last gasp of the Cold War; and as the place where social movements have challenged neoliberalism and brought an indigenous president to power. Through details about the lives of those who reside in the Andes, this course will bring together anthropological and historical views of this region with cases primarily from Peru, Bolivia, and Ecuador.

Diversity Area

Critical Social Inquiry 0152: Zapatismo
Margaret Cerullo 10:30AM-11:50AM T,TH

Today, newspapers speak of a decided tilt to the left in Latin America (Ecuador, Venezuela, Bolivia, Uruguay, for example, all have presidents who affirm socialism). This movement is accompanied, or propelled by, indigenous coalitions, that are challenging even governments firmly in the US orbit (Columbia and Mexico). This was not the case twenty years ago, when, to everyone's astonishment, the Zapatistas rose in revolt in Chiapas. Surfacing the same day that NAFTA went into effect-January 1, 1994, they announced a different vision of Mexico's future. The actions and writings of the Zapatistas constitute an extraordinary case study in which many preoccupations converge: the economic, the political, indigenous rights, women's rights, civil society, cultural memory, and writing that is poetic and political. Focusing on the Zapatista revolt enables us to consider an example of "local" resistance to "global" designs, the ongoing challenge to neoliberal economics and to limited conceptions of "democracy" that condemn populations to invisibility, their cultural memory to oblivion, and their needs and knowledge to subaltern status.

Contemporary Issues Area

Cognitive Science 0138: Endangered Languages
Mark Feinstein 10:30AM-11:50AM T,TH

Half of the world's six thousand or so languages are likely to disappear forever in the next few decades. This would be a reduction of human diversity on a scale equaling the most dramatic biological extinctions. Can it be stopped? Should it? In this course, students learn enough linguistics to understand why many linguists regard the impending death of so many languages as a scientific catastrophe, and we explore a range of issues in linguistic, cultural, and biological evolution. A central feature of the course is the introductory study of Irish (Gaeilge), spoken by millions in Ireland just a few centuries ago. Now, with no more than fifty thousand native speakers, this Celtic language faces its possible demise. We also examine contemporary political, cultural, and educational efforts to maintain Irish and save it from extinction. Students are expected to complete several written assignments, and to present a final project on the structure and sociolinguistic status of an endangered language of their choosing.

Cultural Expressions Area

 

Mount Holyoke:

Environmental Studies 317:  Perspectives on American Environmental History
Lauret Savoy, Mondays 1:15 - 4:05

Diversity Area and Contemporary Issues Area

 

Fall 2012 Courses:

University of Massachusetts Amherst:

Anthro 220: Intro: Native American Studies
Tuesdays and Thursdays 11:15 - 12:30 p.m.
Jean S. Forward
This course provides an engaging introduction to Native American/Indigenous studies as an intellectual discipline and to some of the people working in this field at UMass and the Four Colleges. Readings and presentations from diverse disciplines will serve to introduce students to the variety of lifeways of the original peoples of North, Central and South America and help students to understand that the ongoing colonial encounter continues to be a major factor in the lives of Native peoples of the Western Hemisphere.* (Note this is the same course as Anthro 197B, cannot be repeated)
This course satisfies the Diversity Area requirement.

Anthro 270: North American Indians
On-line through the Division of Continuing Education
Instructor TBD
Survey of the indigenous people of America north of Mexico; their regional variations and adaptations, their relationship to each other, and the changes taking place in their life-ways.
This course satisfies the Diversity Area requirement.

Anthro 369: North American Archaeology
Tuesdays and Thursdays 9:30 - 10:45 a.m.
D. Rae Gould
This course explores the history and issues of North American archaeology through a survey of case studies and archaeological sites, time periods, and interpretive issues from the late Pleistocene through contemporary times. We will study the arrival, spread, and subsequent cultural developments of people in this region of the Western hemisphere, while also discussing the relevant history of Central and South American indigenous developments. The entire time span of the human presence in North America will be considered, dating back to 20,000-30,000 BP. We will also discuss how the archaeological record is used to both interpret the past and influence the present. Important political issues from the past 40 years explored in this course include the struggles for sovereignty and repatriation Native American people have undertaken and the changing role of Indigenous people in the world of American archaeology in the 21st century.
This course satisfies the Diversity Area requirement.

ANTHRO 499C: Historic and Contemporary Issues of American Indian and Tribes: History, Policy, and Law
Tuesdays, 2:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Kathleen Brown-Perez
Indian casinos, teepees, Wounded Knee, Navajo Code Talkers. What do you think of when you hear the term “American Indian”? What happened to Indians in the past and what is happening today? Knowledge of federal Indian policy and law as well as American Indian history through the years is essential to understanding what is happening to Indians and tribes today, why it’s happening, and how it could change.  In reviewing the policies, their effects on individual tribes will be examined, with a focus on how the effects differed from tribe to  tribe, because the tribes, approximately 700 of them, are diverse,  each with its own history, culture, government, beliefs, and ideals.  In addition to historical and contemporary Indian policy, numerous other topics will be covered, including gaming, Indian environmental rights, and federal acknowledgment.
Fall semester will consist of reading relevant books and articles, while students begin research on their senior honors theses. A first rough draft will be due at semester’s end.
During spring semester, students will continue work on individual papers.

This is the first part of a two-semester sequence (4 credits per  semester) that fulfills the Capstone Experience requirement of  Commonwealth Honors College.Students who register for ANTHRO 499C in the fall are required to take the 4-credit  continuation course in the spring (ANTHRO 499D).
Permission of instructor required.

AfroAm 397B ST: Native Americans and African Americans
Tuesday 7:00-9:30 p.m.
John Bracey and Joyce Vincent
Explores numerous levels and terms of the encounter between Native Americans and Blacks, including native tribal identity, Black identity, famous people of mixed ancestry, contested identities, Native Americans in jazz and pop music. Native and Black cultural traditions in intermarriage, Native Americans as slaves, slavery and freedmen, "free colored" communities, decoding historical documents, tribal legacy assertions, "triracials," and the impact of mixed ancestry on both Black and native communities.
This course satisfies the Diversity Area.

COMP-LIT 335: Comic Art in North America
Mondays and Wednesdays 10:10 – 11:00 a.m.
N. Couch
This course introduces Comic Art in North America, from the beginnings of the newspaper comic strip through comic books graphic novels, and electronic media including the history and aesthetics of the medium, comparison between developments in the United States, Mexico, and French Canada, and the social and cultural contexts in which comic art is created and consumed.

English 270: American Identities
Tuesdays and Thursdays 9:30 – 10:45 a.m.
Ron Welburn
Explores the ways literature participates in the definition of national identity. Readings focus on ways American issues of creed, class, status, gender, self and community, possession and dispossession, nationhood and ethnicity, and language have contributed to American identities.

This course satisfies the Diversity Area requirement.

GEOSCI 420: Political Ecology
Tuesdays and Thursdays 11:15 – 12:30 p.m.
Stanley Stevens
Introduction to human geography perspectives on the historical transformation of the earth and current environmental issues. Political ecology explores the diverse, complex spatially and temporally variable, multi-scale and often place/region specific politics, political economy, and socio-cultural dynamics of environmental change and conservation. Special attention to communities, Indigenous peoples, women, environmental and social justice movements, and contested "development" and conservation initiatives. Course case studies analyze political ecologies of diverse world regions and historical eras.

History 170: Indigenous Peoples of North America
Tuesday and Thursday 4:00 – 4:50 p.m. and discussion
Alice Nash
This course is an introduction to the history of indigenous peoples within the present-day borders of the U.S.A. and Canada. While we will only be able to cover a few culture groups in any depth, the major themes of the course relate to all groups, colonization, trade, land loss, sovereignty, religion and missionaries, treaties, war and peace, and identity. Another theme that runs throughout the course is the tension between history as understood and experienced by indigenous peoples and history as recorded and written by Euroamericans. Throughout, we will consider how "history" bears on the present day.
This course satisfies the Diversity Area requirement.

History 354: History of Mexico
Wednesdays and Fridays 2:30 – 3:20 p.m. and discussion
Jose Hernandez
History of Mexican culture, society and politics from the late 18th century to the present. Emphasis on the legacy of Spanish colonialism, popular social movements of the 19th century, origins, process, and outcome of the Revolution of 1910, the student movement of 1968, and the ongoing quest for economic and political stability against the backdrop of the 1980s debt crisis, NAFTA, and the 1994 Zapatista uprising in Chiapas. Previous Latin American history survey desirable.
This course satisfies the Diversity Area requirement.

PUBH 590: Youth Health: Identity, Marginalization & Resilience
TBD
Lisa Wexler
This 3-credit interdisciplinary course will provide students an opportunity to consider youth as a modern idea, a critical life stage, and as a political category. These understandings situate young people in particular ways that have real health consequences. Using adult learning theory, we will consider our own experiences, study youth development theories, and explore age-based social inequalities and the construction of “teen problems.” Students will consider the implications of these ideas on young people’s lived experiences and their health. Bringing these issues into public health relevance, students will explore how marginalization contributes to youth health disparities, and conversely, will investigate how to promote youth resilience and thriving. No prerequisites are required.
This course satisfies the Diversity Area and Contemporary Issues Area requirements.

Amherst College:

AMST 111-04: Global Valley
Tuesdays and Thursdays 2:30 – 3:50 p.m.
Lisa Brooks

Drawing on a wide range of primary materials, and taking advantage of the ease of visiting the sites of many of the topics we study, this course offers an introduction to American Studies through an exploration of the Connecticut River Valley that stresses both the fascination of detailed local history and the economic, political, social, and cultural networks that tie this place to the world. Topics may include conflicts and accommodations between Native peoples and English settlers; changing uses of land and resources; 17th century witchcraft trials; the American Revolution and Shays rebellion; religious revivalism of the Great Awakening; abolitionist and other 19th century reform movements; tourism and the scenic including Thomas Cole’s famous painting of the oxbow; immigration, industrialization and deindustrialization, especially in the cities of Holyoke and Springfield; educational institutions and innovations; the cold war, the reach of the “military industrial complex” into local educational institutions, and “the bunker”; the sanctuary movement; feminist and gay activism; present environmental, mass incarceration, and other social equity issues; and of course, Emily Dickinson's poetry.

Mount Holyoke College:


HIST 235-01: Native American History Through 1865
Tuesdays and Thursdays 10:00 – 11:15 a.m.
Christine Delucia
This course surveys Native American history from ancient times through the U.S. Civil War, tracing the ways that tribal communities have shaped North America. Beginning with the diverse indigenous societies that inhabited the Americas millennia before Columbus's arrival, it discusses the cultural complexity of Native peoples, nations, and worldviews rooted in particular ecosystems and homelands. It moves through the early modern era of European scientific exploration and 'discovery' of a New World, and the pivotal violences of the 'Indian Wars' of the seventeenth, eighteenth, and early nineteenth centuries.
This course satisfies the Diversity Area requirement.

HIST-301-01: Colloquium: Homelands and New Worlds: Landscapes of
Encounter in the Native Northeast and Colonial New England

Wednesdays 1:15 – 4:05 p.m.
Christine Delucia
This course examines Native and colonial understandings of 'place' in the region today called New England. Beginning with indigenous homelands, it investigates Algonquian Indian ancestral and mythic landscapes that rooted Native communities in particular ecosystems. It moves through the colonization period, tracking how European arrivals transferred Old World ideas, agendas, and organisms into new environments. It examines colonists' strategies for exploiting natural resources of the rivers, forests, and coasts, and for developing built environments that made the New World feel like home.
This course satisfies the Diversity Area requirement.

Spring 2012:

University of Massachusetts Amherst:

Anthro 270: North American Indians
On-line through the Division of Continuing Education
Instructor TBD
Survey of the indigenous people of America north of Mexico; their regional variations and adaptations, their relationship to each other, and the changes taking place in their life-ways.
This course satisfies the Diversity Area requirement.

Anthro 370/670: Contemporary Issues of North American Indians: Focus on the Northeast
Thursday 2:30 - 5:00 p.m.
Jean S. Forward and D. Rae Gould
This course is designed to inform students of the current issues facing the Native American Indians in the Northeast of North America. Through presentations by five guest speakers, all Northeast Native American Indian leaders, indigenous knowledge of the contemporary situations is introduced into the academy.
This course satisfies the Diversity Area requirement.

Anthro 396W: Indigenous Program: Spring Break
Days/Time: TBD
Jean S. Forward
Indigenous Alternative Spring Break: This course integrates academic knowledge with an organized service learning experience in a contemporary Indigenous community. The course encourages students to more deeply explore their academic leanings, both in their major and in the required Gen. Ed. courses, and mesh them with the student's experiences in the community they serve. Each community chooses the agenda for the ASB, local control of this experience is essential. Challenges encountered in community settings will make students more aware of their own strengths, limitations and core values, leading students to develop improved skills of communication. Students will also learn to work collaboratively with each other and the community and learn their capacity to impact contemporary social problems.
**This spring, 2012, there are two sections of Indigenous ASB; one at the urban Indian center in Boston, North American Indian Center of Boston (NAICOB), and one with the Houma on the Gulf Coast of Louisiana. Enrollment in the course is by application below or by e-mailing jforward@anthro.umass.edu.

Houma Application

NAICOB Application

Anthro 497 EN: Endangered Languages
Tuesday and Thursday 9:30-10:45 a.m.
Emiliana Cruz
Among the world's 7000 languages, more than half are poised for extinction in the next century. The course offers an analysis of as well as, a humanistic appreciation for linguistic diversity and what it means for humankind; and of contemporary conditions and assumptions that imperil this diversity. We will learn about the work of indigenous language activists and documentary linguists around the world. We will address three major questions: 1) How do languages become extinct? 2) Is language loss forced or is it chosen? 3) Does culture disappear when a language dies? In addition to reading the assigned material and contributing actively to seminar discussions, students will be responsible for one or more class presentations and a final paper.
This course satisfies the Cultural Expressions Area requirements.

Anthro 597CE: Archaeology, Heritage, and Contemporary Social Engagement: A Caribbean Case Study
Mondays 12:20 - 3:20 p.m.
Instructors: Whitney Battle-Baptiste and Neil Silberman
The goal of this course is to explore the archaeology, heritage, and contemporary social challenges facing Caribbean societies—with a special emphasis on the case of the “out island” of Eleuthera in the Bahamas, which is the focus of an ongoing project of the Center for Heritage and Society.  Beginning with an overview of the entire Caribbean region, the readings and discussions will focus on Euro-American cultural representations of the Caribbean as a place of danger and seduction, its present socio-economic context in a globalized world, and its archaeology from the earliest human settlements to the present.  A major part of the course will be devoted to examining the continuing impact of colonialism and slavery, through its evolving manifestations in Caribbean agriculture, industry, and tourism—as typified by the site of Millars Plantation, within site of the tourist playground of Princess Cruise lines.  What are the connections between mass tourism and plantation agriculture?  What is the heritage of the contemporary Eleutheran population and its relationship to the locally unique manifestations of slavery and agricultural exploitation?  As we will see, archaeological research and heritage assessment in this region can be used as tools to shed light on both neo-colonial domination and the possibilities of progressive social change.  How these instruments of historical representation will or can be used at the study site on Eleuthera and throughout the modern Caribbean will be the central theme and focus of the course. 

An optional travel component of this course will be a study visit to Eleuthera over spring break.  Participants will tour the island, meet with community groups, enjoy its spectacular beaches and historic towns, and take part in an initial archaeological reconnaissance of the site of Millars Plantation.  Cost (including airfare, accommodations, meals, and on-island transportation):  Approximately $1600--check with instructors. 

AfroAm 397B ST: Native Americans and African Americans
Tuesday 7:00-9:30 p.m.
John Bracey and Joyce Vincent
Explores numerous levels and terms of the encounter between Native Americans and Blacks, including native tribal identity, Black identity, famous people of mixed ancestry, contested identities, Native Americans in jazz and pop music. Native and Black cultural traditions in intermarriage, Native Americans as slaves, slavery and freedmen, "free colored" communities, decoding historical documents, tribal legacy assertions, "triracials," and the impact of mixed ancestry on both Black and native communities.
This course satisfies the Diversity Area and Contemporary Issues Area requirements.

COMP-Lit 231: Comedy
Tuesdays and Thurdays 4:00 - 5:15 p.m.
Instructor TBD
Our course begins with the premise that contemporary American comedy is informed by the histories of ethnic American groups--African Americans, Native Americans, Asian Americans, and U.S. Latinos/Latinas--along with issues of race, class, sexuality and citizenship. American comedians independent filmmakers, feminists and transgendered comics deploy the language of comedy to invoke serious social matters in contemporary American life: racism, heterosexism, homophobia, class biases against the poor and teh undocumented, misogyny, war and other burning issues of the day. We will thus consider that the ends of comedy are more than laughter. Comedy confronts political issues that are constitutive of and threatening to the U.S. body politic.
This course satisfies the Diversity Area and Contemporary Issues Area requirements.

English 116: Native American Literature
Tuesday and Thursday 2:30 - 3:45 p.m.
Laura M. Furlan
This is an introductory course on the work of American Indian authors, which includes autobiography, poetyr, and fiction, from the 19th century to the present. Students learn basic research and critical skills in reading Native American texts. We will discuss what makes a text "Indian," how and why a major boom in Native American writing occured in teh late 1960s, how oral tradition is incorporated into contemporary writing, and how geographic place and tribal affiliation influence the work. We will also survey current theoretical trends in the study of American Indian literature, including debates about aesthetics and literary nationalism.
This course satisfies the Contemporary Issues Area and Cultural Expressions requirements.

English 300: Junior Year Writing
Tuesday and Thursday 11:15 - 12:30 a.m.
Laura M. Furlan
Topic: Erdrich & Alexie. This course is an intensive study of the work of two best-selling contemporary American Indian writers: Louise Erdrich (Ojibwe) and Sherman Alexie (Spokane/Coeur d'Alene). We will examine major works of poetry and fiction by both authors, looking specifically at formal innovations as well as recurring themes in their texts, including constructions of contemporary American Indian identity, issues of sovereignty, relationship to place, the use of Indian humor, the re-visioning and rewriting of historical events, and re-imaginings of the oral tradition. At the same time, we will be thinking about the process of making critical interpretations and what makes for good scholarly writing. This is a reading- and writing- intensive course.
This course satisfies the Contemporary Issues Area and Cultural Expressions requirements.

GEO-SCI 450: Indigenous Peoples & Conservation
Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays 9:05-9:55 a.m.
Stanley Stevens
Indigenous peoples' contributions to biodiversity conservation, issues raised by establishment of national parks on indigenous lands, and approaches linking conservation and rights. Global emphasis, with special attention to the Americas.

GEO-SCI 492NR: National Parks and Protected Areas
Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays 11:15 a.m.-12:05 p.m.
Stanley Stevens
This cours will examine alternative approaches that respect Indigenous peoples' self-determination, self-governance, and decision-making on their territories, lands, and
waters.

History 120: Latin American Civilization: Colonial Period
Tuesdays and Thursdays 1:00-1:50 p.m. and Friday discussion
Heidi Scott
The purpose of this course is to survey the history of colonial Latin America by examining the encounters between Europeans and the Indigenous peoples of the Americas over the course of three centuries. The class will consider the reciprocal effects of this contact. What were the effects of three hundred years of contact, conflict, and colonialism on European civilization? What impact did the conquest have on the peoples, landscapes, geographies, and demography of the Americas? We will examine the role of the Catholic Church, the nature of colonial and global economies, the formation of "race" and racialized caste systems, family life and gender roles, and subaltern resistance, among other themes. The course will run chronologically but may also take some contemporary liberties when appropriate. Opposing viewpoints and historiographical debates will set the tone for many of our discussions and a number of themes will guide our semester together. These themes include the role of Indigenous peoples, the characteristics of colonial rule in Latin America, the nature of colonial relations, and historiographical interpretations of the past. Primary source materials will be used alongside secondary literature. The final grade will consist of short written assignments, a midterm exam, a final exam, and active participation. The active participation component is composed of attendance at lectures and contributions to discussion sections.
This course satisfies the Diversity Area requirement.

Honors 392L: Criminal Law & Justice in the U.S.: From the Crucible to Capone to Crime Scene Investigation
Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 11:15 a.m.-12:05 p.m.
Kathleen A. Brown-Perez
Crime and punishment are among the most important issues in contemporary America and throughout the world. This course offers an introduction to criminal law in the United States, including Indian Country, highlighting changes in criminal behavior and the different ways that Americans have sought to deter, punish, and rehabilitate. Beginning with the colonial period in America, the historical look at the United States will move through the New Republic, the Civil War, and the post-modern era. How has criminal activity, legislative and judicial action and reaction, and punishment, including prisons and the death penalty, changed throughout the centuries? How does the criminal justice system treat American Indian offenders differently? In what ways does location of the crime and tribal affiliation of the defendant affect jurisdiction? This course also emphasizes differences in crime and punishment by class, race, ethnicity, gender, and sex. Special guest lecture by a supervising FBI Special Agent provides a look into federal criminal laws and career opportunities with the FBI. Special guest lectures by forensic anthropologist Ventura R. Pérez give students an introduction to structural and cultural violence and real crime scene investigation.
This course satisfies the Contemporary Issues Area requirement.

NRC 597CC : Cree Culture, Natural Resources, and Sustainability
Thursday 6:00 - 9:00 p.m.
Paul K. Barten
This small, interdisciplinary course combines reading and group discussions, a winter camping trip with a Cree family in northern Quebec (during Spring Recess), and an individual term project and essays to explore 1) traditional and contemporary Cree culture, 2) the local, regional, and international use of natural resources (wood fiber, minerals, hydropower), and 3) fundamental issues of sustainability, stewardship of the environment, and social justice. The term project will be designed collaboratively with the instructor to build upon, integrate, and extend each student's interests, talents, and skills in relation to the course content. This course is designed for mature and self-motivated juniors, seniors, and graduate students with interests in native people and cultures, the conservation and stewardship of natural resources, and the lessons of history as they inform our individual and societal efforts to live more sustainably.

Hampshire College:

CSI 0259-1: Native American Environment
Monday 2:30 - 5:20 p.m.
Catherine Bryson
Over the past several decades, the environmental justice movement has reshaped environmentalism by demanding consideration not simply for wilderness conservation and species preservation, but for complex social problems like environmental racism - in short, the disproportionate exposure of communities of color to toxic contamination and environmental degradation. These struggles have been meaningful within Native American communities for centuries, throughout the colonial project that disrupted possession of and relationships to land, through active genocide, assimilation or relocation policy, and/or government seizure and contamination of land and resources. This course aims to examine and illuminate the historical context of environmentalism and environmental justice as it relates to Native land; the current political and environmental challenges faced by those living on Native land; and our own personal and academic relationships to these struggles through group discussion and intensive independent research.

HACU 0258-1: Colonialism & the Visual Arts
Tuesday 12:20 - 3:20 p.m.
Sura Levine
This course will explore aspects of the visual and cultural representations of colonialism and expansionism in the arts of Western Europe and the United States. Topics will include: Napoleon's Egyptian Campaign of 1798-1799; 19th-century travel literature; Japonisme and the introduction of a Japanese esthetic into western art; manifest destiny in the U. S. and the changing image of the Native American; propaganda imagery of colonialism; the gendering of expansionist imagery; primitivism in modern art; cinematic and popular culture representations of Africa and the Middle East. Throughout, our goal will be to trace the ways that, over the past two centuries, Western cultures have represented themselves in depicting their colonial others.

Mount Holyoke College:

LATAM 388-01: Postmodernism & Latin America
Tuesdays 7:00 – 10:00 p.m.
Lowell Gudmundson
For many the "discovery" of America opened the modern era. Its closing may also have been foretold in Latin America"s confounding of diverse theories of modernization and development in recent times. This seminar will introduce the student to a number of both classic and more recent works on Latin America (in English) that advance along postmodernist lines, ranging from cultural contact and conflict, language, meaning, and power in the sixteenth century, to the invention of national identities in the nineteenth century, to discourses of ethnicity, class, gender, and reason in the twentieth century.

Smith College:

HST 268-01-LEC: Native American Indians Since 1500
Mondays and Wednesdays 1:10 - 2:30 p.m.
Dawn Peterson
Because of the spatial and temporal breadth of this survey and the diversity of the histories it addresses, over the course of the semester we will focus on select North American Indian peoples in historical periods after 1500. Some major themes include political negotiation and alliance; trade; gender, labor, and the experiences of Native women; the ideologies and material practices of conquest and colonization; formations of colonial violence; histories of captivity and slavery; the defense of culture and homelands; de-colonization; cultural innovation and resilience; and indigenous articulations of history and sovereignty.

 

Fall 2011:

University of Massachusetts Amherst:

Anthro 220: Introduction to Native American Studies
Tuesday and Thursday 11:15 a.m.
Jean S. Forward
This course will introduce students to Native American/Indigenous studies as an intellectual discipline and to some of the people working in this field at UMass and the Four Colleges. Readings and presentations will serve to introduce students to the variety of life-ways of the original peoples of North and South America and help students to understand that the ongoing colonial encounter is a major factor in the lives of Native peoples of the Western Hemisphere.
This course satisfies the Diversity Area and Contemporary Issues Area requirements.

Anthro 270: North American Indians
Tuesday and Thursday 2:30 p.m.
Jean S. Forward
This course will examine the indigenous cultures and peoples of North America: pre-, during and beyond the contact with non-Native Americans. Our purpose is to understand the diversity of their cultures (hundreds of languages and lifestyles), their relationships with each other, their connections to their Homelands and thei persistence in the 21st century.
This course satisfies the Diversity Area requirement.

Anthro 369: North American Archaeology
Tuesday and Thursday 1:00-2:15 p.m.
Eric Johnson
This course is a survey of the archaeological evidence for pre-Contact Native American history in North America. We will focus on some of the key issues of the region, including the peopling of the New World more than 12,000 years ago, evidence for Native Aemerican subsistence, settlement, and ceremonial practices, the origins of agriculture, models of social complexity, and the consequences of European colonization.
This course satisfies the Diversity Area requirement.

Anthro 397 MG: Languages of Mexico and Guatemala
Tuesday and Thursday 4:00-5:15 p.m.
Emiliana Cruz
This course is an introduction to the indigenous languages that are and have been spoken in Mexico and Guatamala. We will focus on three indigenous languages: Chatino and Nahuatl, spoken in Mexico, and Jacaltec, spoken in Guatamala. We will study the characteristics of these languages in their respective social and political contexts from linguistic and anthropological perspectives. Who are the speakers of these languages? What makes a language endangered? What are the prospects for indigenous languages to continue to be spoken in the next twenty years? What are the political, economic, and social factors that lead indigenous speakers to adopt Spanish as a primary language? How do native speakers value their own languages and how does this differ from the perspectives of non-indigenous people? What roles have native speakers played in language revitalization? And what roles have linguists played in language maintenance?
This course satisfies the Contemporary Issues Area and Cultural Expressions Area requirements.

Anthro 597LP: Ideologies and Practices of Language Preservation
Wednesday 12:20-3:20 p.m.
Emiliana Cruz
This course explores the objectives, challenges, competing ideologies, and criticisms of preserving indigenous languages. We will discuss 1) the role of diverse participants and stakeholders involved in language preservation: indigenous and non-indigenous scholars, indigenous communities, funding agencies and nation-states; 2) the barriers to language preservation 3) language ideologies, identity, authenticity, and ownership of indigenous languages. The readings will come from many domains and perspectives: anthropology, linguistics, indigenous rights, indigenous languages people who conduct research on their own languages. In addition to reading the assigned material and contributing actively to seminar discussions, students will be responsible for one or more class presentations and a final paper.
This course satisfies the Contemporary Issues Area requirement.

Anthro 597AG: NAGPRA and Issues of Cultural Property in the Northeast United States
Monday 9:05 a.m.-12:05 p.m.
Rae Gould
This course satisfies the Contemporary Issues Area requirement.

AfroAm 397B ST: Native Americans and African Americans
Wednesday 7:00-9:30 p.m.
John Bracey and Joyce Vincent
Explores numerous levels and terms of the encounter between Native Americans and Blacks, including native tribal identity, Black identity, famous people of mixed ancestry, contested identities, Native Americans in jazz and pop music. Native and Black cultural traditions in intermarriage, Native Americans as slaves, slavery and freedmen, "free colored" communities, decoding historical documents, tribal legacy assertions, "triracials," and the impact of mixed ancestry on both Black and native communities.
This course satisfies the Diversity Area and Contemporary Issues Area requirements.

Honors 392L: Criminal Law & Justice in the U.S.: From the Crucible to Capone to Crime Scene Investigation
Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 11:15 a.m.-12:05 p.m.
Kathleen A. Brown-Perez
Crime and punishment are among the most important issues in contemporary America and throughout the world. This course offers an introduction to criminal law in the United States, including Indian Country, highlighting changes in criminal behavior and the different ways that Americans have sought to deter, punish, and rehabilitate. Beginning with the colonial period in America, the historical look at the United States will move through the New Republic, the Civil War, and the post-modern era. How has criminal activity, legislative and judicial action and reaction, and punishment, including prisons and the death penalty, changed throughout the centuries? How does the criminal justice system treat American Indian offenders differently? In what ways does location of the crime and tribal affiliation of the defendant affect jurisdiction? This course also emphasizes differences in crime and punishment by class, race, ethnicity, gender, and sex. Special guest lecture by a supervising FBI Special Agent provides a look into federal criminal laws and career opportunities with the FBI. Special guest lectures by forensic anthropologist Ventura R. Pérez give students an introduction to structural and cultural violence and real crime scene investigation.
This course satisfies the Contemporary Issues Area requirement.

History 120: Latin American Civilization: Colonial Period
Monday 9:05-9:55 a.m. and Friday discussion
Instructor TBA
The purpose of this course is to survey the history of colonial Latin America by examining the encounters between Europeans and the Indigenous peoples of the Americas over the course of three centuries. The class will consider the reciprocal effects of this contact. What were the effects of three hundred years of contact, conflict, and colonialism on European civilization? What impact did the conquest have on the peoples, landscapes, geographies, and demography of the Americas? We will examine the role of the Catholic Church, the nature of colonial and global economies, the formation of "race" and racialized caste systems, family life and gender roles, and subaltern resistance, among other themes. The course will run chronologically but may also take some contemporary liberties when appropriate. Opposing viewpoints and historiographical debates will set the tone for many of our discussions and a number of themes will guide our semester together. These themes include the role of Indigenous peoples, the characteristics of colonial rule in Latin America, the nature of colonial relations, and historiographical interpretations of the past. Primary source materials will be used alongside secondary literature. The final grade will consist of short written assignments, a midterm exam, a final exam, and active participation. The active participation component is composed of attendance at lectures and contributions to discussion sections.
This course satisfies the Diversity Area requirement.

History 170: Indigenous Peoples of North America
Tuesday and Thursday 4:00-4:50 and discussion
Alice Nash
This course is an introduction to the history of indigenous peoples within the present-day borders of the U.S.A. and Canada. While we will only be able to cover a few culture groups in any depth, the major themes of the course relate to all groups, colonization, trade, land loss, sovereignty, religion and missionaries, treaties, war and peace, and identity. Another theme that runs throughout the course is the tension between history as understood and experienced by indigenous peoples and history as recorded and written by Euroamericans. Throughout, we will consider how "history" bears on the present day.
This course satisfies the Diversity Area requirement.

English 115: The American Experience
Monday and Wednesday 4:40-5:30 and discussion
Laura M. Furlan
The American Experience is about encountering, and subsequently knowing, the Other--initially, the Native peoples of the Americas. These encounters pervade American literary and cultural productions, from the earliest travel journals and captivity narratives, to nineteenth-century representations of vanishing Indians, to the Modernists obsession with the primitive, to the environmental movement’s use of the “ecological Indian,” to contemporary films like The New World that continue to highlight this preoccupation. Indians, argues Vine Deloria, Jr., “haunt the collective unconscious” of the United States. In this course, we will trace this “haunted” U.S. history through representations and self-representations of Indians in the American cultural imagination, as a way of rethinking the construction of American identity. We will be discussing the ways in which these explorations take Native America as the ostensible “center,” but also the ways they provide a lens through which we can examine larger American history and culture. We will consider both historical documents and literary texts, along with paintings, advertisements, cultural phenomena such as the World’s Columbian Exposition and Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show, monuments, coins, radio, films like Disney’s Pocahontas and Dances with Wolves, photography, and popular music, including Neil Young’s “Pocahontas” and Outkast’s “Hey Ya.”
This course satisfies the Contemporary Issues Area and Cultural Expressions requirements.

PLSOILIN 190C : Cultural Entomology
Monday, Wednesday and Friday 11:15 a.m. -12:05 p.m.
John Stoffolano
Since their origin, insects have always been and, will remain the dominant life-form on earth. Because of this, they have permeated the lives and minds of humans everywhere and throughout human history. Thus, the insect is an excellent vehicle to explore global diversity and to demonstrate how diverse cultures view and use insects in their myths, foods, and religions. This course will explore how diverse cultures have used insects, both from a historical and a global cultural standpoint. The role of insects in history, art, music, astronomy, literature, theater, medicine, agriculture, trade, and biology of various world cultures will be explored and will reveal the foundations and underpinnings of cultural diversity. Emphasis will be on their cultural role. Course includes an interactive website (Spark) containing video clip concepts, interactive programs and powerpoint lectures. No prerequisite.
This course satisfies the Cultural Expressions requirements.

 

Spring 2011:

University of Massachusetts Amherst:

Anthro 370/670 (697OO): Contemporary Issues of North American Indians: Focus on the Northeast
Thursday 2:30-5:00
Jean S. Forward and Rae Gould
This is an interactive class that builds itself around visiting speakers from Indigenous nations and communities (urban and rural) of the Greater Northeast.
This course satisfies the Anthro 370/670 requirement for the program. Students must take this course for the Certificate Program.

Anthro 270: Native American Indians (Online)
This course satisfies the Diversity Area requirement.

Anthro 297VC ST: Violence and Conflict in PreHispanic Americas
Tuesday and Thursday 2:30-3:45
Ventura Perez
This course satisfies the Diversity Area requirement.

Anthro 396W IS: Indigenous Program: Alternative Spring Break (Restrictions)
This is a class geared towards participation in an alternative spring break trip to the Narragansett Tomaquag Museum. E-mail Jean Forward at jforward@anthro.umass.edu for more information.
Jean S. Forward
This course satisfies the Contemporary Issues Area requirement or the Cultural Expressions Area requirement.

Education 377 : Introduction to Multicultural Education
Introduction to the sociohistorical, philosophical, and pedagogical foundations of cultural pluralism and multicultural education. Topics include experiences of racial minorities, white ethnic groups and women; intergroup relations in American society, sociocultural influences and biases in schools; and philosophies of cultural pluralism.
Tuesday 1:00-3:30
Charu Turner
This course satisfies the Contemporary Issues Area requirement.

History 120: Latin American Civilization: Colonial Period
Monday and Wednesday 3:35-4:25, Friday labs
Jose Hernandez
General view of the cultural, economic, and political development of Latin America, 1492 to 1824. Topics include the Iberian and Indian backgrounds; Spanish and Portuguese imperial organization; role of Indians, Blacks, and Europeans in the New World; the coming of independence.
This course satisfies the Diversity Area requirement.

Polysci 397E ST : Indigenous Rights and Social Movements in Latin America (Restrictions)
Tuesday and Thursday 11:15-12:30
Angelica Bernal
This course satisfies the Contemporary Issues Area requirement.

Linguistics 391B: Indigenous Languages of North America
Tuesday and Thursday 1:00-2:15
Peggy Speas
In 1492, there were at least 300 different languages, from 9 different language families, spoken north of Mexico. These languages have not all died out! About 150 of them are still spoken in the US and Canada. This course includes an introduction to each of the 9 language families, in-depth study of the unique grammatical properties of several languages in each family, and a look at the efforts of contemporary speakers to preserve, revitalize or restore their languages.
This course satisfies the Cultural Expressions Area requirement.

Honors 392X: Visions and Revisions: Literary Nonfiction in Social History
Kathleen A. Brown-Pérez
This class will look at the interaction between the various peoples of colonial America, with a focus on Indians of the Northeast.
This course satisfies the Diversity Area requirement.

English 116: Native American Literature
Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 10:10-11:00
Ron Welburn
Enrollment capacity is 35.
The focus of this course will be selected writings and oral tradition narratives by Indigenous North Americans. Texts will include a novel by Diane Glancy, essays by N. Scott Momaday and Anna Lee Walters, and selected writings by other Native authors. Expect to write a series of short essays; a research project for the final; and a Cherokee language syllabary exercise. Texts will be available at Food For Thought Books.
This course satisfies the Cultural Expressions Area requirement.

English 791C: Contemporary American Indian Fiction
Thursday 6:00-8:30pm
Laura M. Furlan
This course will trace the development of contemporary American Indian fiction, beginning with D’Arcy McNickle’s The Surrounded (1934) and ending with Linda Hogan’s People of the Whale (2008). We will be looking at formal innovations as well as recurring themes in these texts, including constructions of contemporary American Indian identity, issues of sovereignty, the trope of “blood memory,” relationship to place, the use of Indian humor, the re-visioning and rewriting of historical events, and re-imaginings of the oral tradition. We will focus particularly on the Native American Renaissance, the beginnings of which can be traced to N. Scott Momaday’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, House Made of Dawn (1968). At the same time, we will trace theoretical innovations in American Indian literary theory, thinking critically about the category of “American Indian literature” and considering some of the current critical approaches in the field—cultural, feminist, nationalist, tribally-specific, cosmopolitan, and transnational. In addition to McNickle’s and Momaday’s novels, primary texts may include Leslie Marmon Silko’s Ceremony, Louise Erdrich’s Tracks, Sherman Alexie’s Indian Killer, Greg Sarris’s Grand Avenue, Diane Glancy’s Pushing the Bear, Craig Womack’s Drowning in Fire, Stephen Graham Jones’s Ledfeather, and Linda Hogan’s People of the Whale. Books will be ordered at Amherst Books.
This course satisfies the Contemporary Issues Area requirement or the Cultural Expressions Area requirement.

NRC 597CC : Cree Culture, Natural Resources, and Sustainability
Thursday 6:00-9:00
Paul K. Barten
This small, interdisciplinary course combines reading and group discussions, a winter camping trip with a Cree family in northern Quebec (during Spring Recess), and an individual term project to explore (1) traditional and contemporary Cree culture, (2) the local, regional, and international use of natural resources (wood fiber, minerals, hydropower), and (3) fundamental issues of sustainability, stewardship of the environment, and social justice. The term project will be designed collaboratively with the instructor to build upon, integrate, and extend each student’s interests, talents, and skills in relation to the core topics and activities.
This course satisfies the Contemporary Issues Area requirement or the Cultural Expressions Area requirement.

Mount Holyoke College:

Anthro 316: Landscapes of Indigeneity: Indigenous Peoples and Law in North America
Monday 7:00-10:00pm
Jennifer Hamilton
This course explores the some of the current legal issues facing indigenous peoples in the US and Canada from an anthropological perspective. An orienting question for this course is how contemporary "landscapes of indigeneity" came to be as a result of complex legal, political, economic and sociocultural processes. Topics include law, colonialism, and nation-building; law, science, and the emergence of indigenous legal identities; real and intellectual property; and contemporary indigenous legal issues in (post)colonial settler societies including repatriation, Indian gaming, and resource rights.
This course satisfies the Contemporary Issues Area requirement.

Gender Studies 206/History 296: Native American Women's History
Tuesday and Thursday 11-12:15
Chantal Norrgard
This course explores Native American women' experiences across tribal nations from a historical perspective. We will look at Native American women' contributions to tribal communities and American history more broadly and re-examine representations of Native American women in myth, literature and popular culture. We will also look at traditional concepts of women' person-hood and roles in Native American societies, as well as the ways in which they changed over time. The colloquium will emphasize the individual stories of women' persistence and the challenges and successes of living under the conditions of American colonialism.
This course satisfies the Diversity Area requirement.

History 236:  Native American History 1830 to the Present
Tuesday and Thursday 8:35-9:50
Chantal Norrgard
This course explores how Native American navigated the dramatic changes of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries to become the vibrant communities that they are today. It traces the challenges and struggles Native peoples have faced from the Removal era in the 1830s to the present. We will look at the connections between the development of federal Indian policy and Native American resistance to U.S. objectives, as well as critical changes in Native American sovereignty over the course of this period. As part of this study, the course emphasizes the persistence and integrity of Native American communities past and present.
This course satisfies the Diversity Area requirement.

History 382:  Native Americans in the Twentieth Century
Wednesday 1:15-4:05
Chantal Norrgard
This course will explore the experiences and stories of Native Americans in the twentieth century that have been largely overlooked in American history. The aim of this course is twofold: We will examine popular assumptions and constructions about Native Americans and modernity that have rendered them invisible in the twentieth century and have been utilized to deny their political rights. And, we will explore the ways in which Native American nations, communities, and individuals created alternative pathways of modernity while retaining their distinct indigenous identities. Students will write an original research paper drawing from primary and secondary sources.
This coures satisfies the Contemporary Issues Area requirement.

Environmental Studies 317: Perspectives on American Environmental History
Thursday 1:15-4:05
Lauret Savoy
We explore the history of human-environment interactions in North America from precolonial times to the present from different cultural perspectives. How have such human activities as migration, colonization, and resource use depended on or modified the natural world? How have different cultural perceptions of and attitudes toward environment shifted through time and helped to reshape American landscapes? Case studies include ecological histories of Native America and Euro-America, slavery and land use, wilderness and conservation, and environmental racism and social justice. Our approach entails historical review of scientific studies, literature, visual records, and oral tradition.
This course satisfies the Diversity Area requirement.

Smith College:

History 268: Native American Indians, 1500 to Present
Tuesday and Thursday 9:00-10:20
Dawn Peterson
Concentrating primarily on Native histories in North America, this introductory course engages with some of the major themes, problems, and questions that have shaped historical scholarship in American Indian studies over the last several decades. It examines a wide range of concerns, including cross-cultural negotiation, imperial alliance, colonial exploitation, and ongoing struggles for individual and collective sovereignty. Considers how these topics are not distillable into a set of abstract principles, but rather that they reveal Native peoples' varying relationships to shifting discourses about reproduction, kinship, religion, warfare, race, property, environment, and economy.
This course satisfies the Diversity Area requirement.

History 355 (Seminar): From Revolution to Removal: Slavery and Indian Policy in the Early American Republic (Instructor Permission)
Thursday 1:00-2:50
Dawn Peterson
Explores the imperialistic ambitions that shaped state policies and everyday life in the early U.S.-American republic, from the Revolutionary period to the Indian Removal Act of 1830. It covers the visions of the "founding fathers" and popular imaginations about the "Revolutionary" state, situating these imaginings within the politics and practices of Indian removal and racial slavery. Also considers strategies that people of American Indian and African descent engaged in to negotiate and resist displacement and servitude.
This course satisfies the Diversity Area requirement.

Anthropology 237: Native South Americans
Tuesday and Thursday 1:00-2:50
D. Joralemon, E. Klarich
Archaeology and ethnography are combined to survey the history and cultures of indigenous South America, from the earliest settlements to contemporary communities. Topics include: early migration, cultural classifications, pre-Hispanic socio-political patterns, native cosmologies and ecological adaptations, challenges to cultural survival and indigenous mobilizations. Team taught by a cultural anthropologist and archaeologist.
This course satisfies the Diversity Area requirement.

Education and Child Study 343-01-LEC : Multicultural Education
An examination of the multicultural approach, its roots in social protest movements and role in educational reform. The course aims to develop an understanding of the key concepts, developments and controversies in the field of multicultural education; cultivate sensitivity to the experiences of diverse people in American society; explore alternative approaches for working with diverse students and their families; and develop a sound philosophical and pedagogical rationale for a multicultural education.
Tuesday and Thursday 10:30-11:50
Lucy Mule
This course satisfies the Contemporary Issues Area requirement.

Amherst College :

English 10-01: Colonies, Empires, and a New Republic
Wednesday and Friday 12:30-1:50
O'Connell D.
Once American literature began with the Pilgrims and Puritans, though they were latecomers among the Europeans in the Americas. In this course we will begin with the oral traditions of some of the native inhabitants and then read accounts from the European discovery and conquest, Spanish, French, and English: Columbus, Verrazano, Cartier, Cortes, Bradford, and others. Then we will read the literature of the settlers: diaries, sermons, captivity narratives, and autobiographies. In the eighteenth century we will follow the emerging literature of independence, not only that written by Anglo-Americans, but also the writings of Africans and African Americans like Olaudah Equiano. We will end the course with the literature of post-independence: novels by Charles Brockden Brown and Rebecca Rush.
This course satisfies the Diversity Area requirement.

 

Fall 2010

Anthro 197B Intro Native American Indians TU TH 11:15AM 12:30PM

Anthro 270 North American Indians 4 credits TuTh 2:30-3:45 Forward

Afro-Am 397B  Native Americans and African Americans Wed 7-9:30 Vincent

Anthro 369 North American Archaeology 3 credits TuTh 1-2:15  Jones

English 115 American Experience MW 4:40-5:30 Furlan

English 115 will have a Native focus, including film, art, and popular culture

English 492J: Contemporary American Indian Literature MW 6:30-7:45 Furlan

Honors 499C: Historic and Contemporary Issues of American Indians and Tribes: History, Policy, and Law MWF 11:15-12:05 Brown-Pérez

Honors 499C is the first part of a two-semester course that focuses on students’ senior honors theses. Enrollment in both semesters required. Permission of instructor required. Interested students must contactBrownPerez@honors.umass.edu. Priority given to seniors completing their honors thesis requirement. Enrollment limited to 12 students.

HISTORY 170: Indian Peoples of North America TU TH 4:00PM 4:50PM Nash

The diverse histories of Indian Peoples of North America from their origins to the present

History 150: American Civ to 1876 TU TH 11:15AM 12:05PM Krauthamer

The development of social, political, economic, and intellectual life in the United States from Native American settlements to 1876. Topics include Puritanism, slavery and antislavery, Indian relations, religious reform as well as such events as the Revolution and Civil War

Introduction to Latin American Cultures 180: MW 11:00-12:15pm Gudmundson (Mt. Holyoke College)

Examines the confrontation, assimilation, and transformation of Amerindian, African, and European cultures in Latin America from the sixteenth century to the present

History 269: Colonial Experience in North America MW 09:00-10:20 Peterson (Smith College)

Explores the ongoing negotiations over the meanings and forms of encounter between and among people of American Indian, African, and European descent between the 16th and 19th centuries

Spring 2010

ANTH 370 Contemporary Issues of North American Indians: Focus on the Northeast Th 2:30-5:00 PM Forward

ANTH 371 W ASB Weekly and Spring Break; Vincent; Must contact dvincent@acad.umass.edu to register

ANTH 4971 Language Revival and Cultural Politics TuTh 9:30-10:45 Urla

ENG 300-LZ Momaday and Silko (Junior-Year Writing Requirement) TuTh 9:30-10:45 Welburn

ENG 393G American Indian Autobiography TuTh 11:15 Furlan

HIST 393I Indigenous Women of North America TuTh 11:15-12:30 Nash

HONORS 392X Visions and Revisions (Intro to Amer. Indians & Tribes)
MWF 10:10-11:00 Brown-Perez

HONORS 499 D Historic & Contemp Issues of Amer Indians & Tribes: Hist, Policy and Law MWF 9:05-9:55 Brown-Perez

PUBPH 796 Analyzing Narrative from the Circumpolar North contact lwexler@schoolph.umass.edu

Amherst College:

HIST 39-01 Native American Histories TuTh 10-11:20 Sweeney

WAGS 07 Gender and the Environment TuTh 11:30-12:50 Picq

Hampshire College:

NS 0138-1 (138856) Health in America pre-/post- Contact TuTh 12:30-1:50 Stone

Smith College:

COMP LIT 301 Translating New Worlds (1500-1750) W 7-9 PM, Leibsohn & Jones

January 2009  through Living Routes.org.

“Fair Trade and Bio-Cultural Regeneration in the Peruvian High Amazon” Apffel-Marglin

Spring  2009

ANTH 370 Contemporary Issues of North American Indians: Focus on the Northeast Th 2:30-5:00 PM  Forward

ANTH 697OO  with Anth 370 Th 2:30-5:00 PM plus 5:00-5:30 Pm Forward and Paynter Bringing Indigenous knowledge into the classroom, especially for Instructors PK- college

ANTH 397UU/597UU   Anthropology of Education  TuTh 9:30- 10:45  AM  Forward

ANTH 497B Native American Languages Th 11:15-2:15 Samuels

COMP LIT  Native Americans & Contemporary Narrative Arts Couch

GEO 497S Indigenous Peoples and Conservation  MWF 10;10-11;00 AM  Stevens

GEO 692B New Paradigm Conservation: Linking Conservation, Rights & Social Justice  MWF 1:25-2:15  Stevens

HIST 693P Indigenous Peoples and the United Nations Tu 6-8:30 PM  Nash

HONORS 392X Visions and Revisions: Literary Nonfiction in Social History Tu 1-3 pm and Th 1-2:15 Pm Brown-Perez (open to graduate students)

HONORS 499D Violence Against Indigenous People and the Policies that Perpetuate It:  The Border Crossed Us   Th 9:30-12:30 Brown-Perez

NASS ASB Alternative Spring Break

Smith College:

HIST 245 Empire in the North:  Native Peoples in Siberia and Alaska under Russian and Soviet Rule  Monday 7-9:30 PM Glebov

HIST 372 Problems in American History: Cross-cultural Captivity in North America, 1500-1860   Tuesday 3-4:50 PM Salisbury (open to graduate students)

Fall 2008

ANTHRO 197B: Introduction to Native American Indian Studies; Carlson, Tu Th 9:30-10:45 AM

ANTHRO 270: North American Indians; Forward, Tu Th 2:30-3:45 PM

ANTHRO 369: North American Archaeology; TBA, M W F 1:35-2:15 PM

COMM 497K: Communication and Nature; Carbaugh, Tu Th 9:30-10:45 AM

ENGLISH 116: Native American Literature; Welburn, M W 4:40-5:55 PM

HISTORY 170: Indigenous Peoples of North America; Nash, Tu Th 4:00-4:50 PM, discussions on Fridays

HISTORY 393F: Salem 1692; Nash, Tu Th 11:15-12:30PM

HONORS 392X: Visions and Revisions: Literary Nonfiction in Social History; Brown-Perez, Tu Th 9:30-10:45AM

HONORS 499C Capstone: Violence Against Indigenous Peoples: Policies That Create Them; Brown-Perez, Tu Th 11:15-12:30PM

Amherst College:

ENGLISH 61: Studies in American Literature; O'Connell, W F 12:30-1:50PM

Spring 2008

ANTHRO 370: Contemporary Issues of NorthAmerican Indians : Focus on the Northeast; Forward et al.,Th 2:30-5:00PM

HIST 355 The Caribbean; Rausch; MW10:10-11:00AM, Fdisc

HONORS 393X Visions and Revisions: Literary Nonfiction in Social History; Brown-Perez, TU TH 9:30-10:45AM

HONORS 499D; Violence Against Indigenous People and the Policies that Perpetuate It: Border Crossed Us; Brown-Perez, TU 1-3:45PM

LATIN-AMER 396/496/596: CLACLS Alternative Spring Break in Argentina; Bernabe-Ramos; W6:30-9:30PM

Fall 2007

ANTHRO 197B: Introduction to Native American Indian Studies
MWF 11:15-12:05 AM (Carlson)

ANTHRO 270: North American Indians
TTh 2:30 – 3:45 p.m. (Forward)

ANTHRO 369: North American Archaeology

TTh 1 – 2:15 p.m. (Eric Johnson)

HIST 120: Latin American Civilization: The Colonial Period
MW 12:30 – 1:10 p.m. (Rausch)
Discussion sections:
Fridays 9:05 – 9:55; 11:15 – 12:05; 12:20 – 1:10 (2)

HIST 170: Native Peoples of North America
TTh 4 – 4:50 (Nash)
Discussion sections: Fridays 9:05 – 9:55 (2); 11: 15 – 12:05

Hampshire College:

HIST 268: Native American Indians, 1500 – Present
TTh 10:30 – 11:50 a.m.


Contemporary Issues Area

AFROAM 397B: Native Americans and African Americans

W 7 – 9:30 p.m. (Bracey & Vincent)

EDUC 377: Introduction to Multicultural Education
T 1 – 3:30 p.m. (two sections) (Tate, Young)

STPEC 493H: Decolonizing Methodologies in Global and Local Contexts

W 10:10am - 12:40pm (Bruchac)

Cultural Expressions Area

COMP-LIT 393D: Native American Indian Pictorial Literature
Tu 6 – 9 p.m. (Couch)

ENG 116: Native American Literatures
MW 2:30 – 3:45 p.m. (Welburn)

PLNTSOIL 596D: Medicinal Plants

Independent Study (Craker)

Spring 2007

ANTH 370: Contemporary Issues in Native America: The Northeast.
TH 2:30-5:30 p.m. (Forward et al.) This course is mandatory for students enrolled in or planning to enroll in the certificate program.

Diversity Area

AFROAM 397: Native Americans and African Americans
W: 7-9:30 p.m. (Bracey and Vincent)

FIVE COLLEGE COURSES:

Hampshire College:


HACU-0220-1: Imagining the Other: Blacks, Indians, and Jews in America
TTh 10:30-11:50 a.m. FPH 107 (Rubenstein)Smith College

Smith College:

ANT 250: Native American Representations
MW 1:10-2:30 p.m. (Mithlo)

HST 270: Aspects of American History: the American Southwest
MW 7:30-9 p.m. (Cottrell)

LAS 301: Topics in Latin American and Latino/a Studies: Culture and Society in the Andes (seminar)
T 3-4:50 p.m. (Zulawski)

Contemporary Issues Area

EDUC 377: Multicultural Education
T 1-3:30 French

GEOSCI 497S: Indigenous Peoples and Conservation
MWF 10-11 a.m.
The course examines the conservation significance of indigenous knowledge, practices, and values; sacred places; commons management; the adverse impacts of national parks and other protected areas; "colonialist" conservation by transnational conservation and development NGOs; local defense of territory, livelihoods, and environment; the global indigenous peoples movement; and "new paradigm" protected areas based on respect for indigenous peoples' self-determination. I will aim for global coverage, but I will stress the Americas and Asia. (Stevens)

HIST 393-I: Indigenous Women in North America
1-2:15 p.m. (Nash)

LEGAL 470: Indigenous Peoples, Global Issues
MW 3:35-4:50 p.m. (Darian-Smith)

STPEC 394D: Deconstructing Stereotypes of American Indians
W: 3:30-6:30 p.m. (Vincent)

Cultural Expressions Area

ENG 116: Native American Literatures
TTH: 9:30-10:45 a.m. (Welburn)

PLNTSOIL 596D: Medicinal Plants (Independent Study)
Craker

Five College Courses:

Smith College:

ARH 130: Introduction to Art History: Africa, Oceania, and Indigenous Americas
MW 1:10-2:30 p.m. (Kart)

ARH 204: Ancient America: Art, Architecture, and Archaeology.
MW 7:30-8:50 p.m. (Kart)

Fall 2005

Diversity Area:

ANTH 197B: Introduction to Native American Indian Studies (Forward)
TTH 9:30 – 10:45 a.m.

ANTH 270: North American Indians (Forward)

TTh 2:30 – 3:45 p.m.

ANTH 369: North American Archaeology (Chilton)

TTh 1 – 2:15 p.m.

HIST 170: Native Peoples of North America (Nash)
TTh 4 – 4:50 p.m.
Discussion Sessions: Fridays
9:05 – 9:55 a.m.
10:10 – 11 a.m. (two sections simultaneously)
11:15 – 12:05
12:30 – 1:10 p.m.

HIST 594L: Native Peoples of the Northeast (Nash)

M 2:30 – 5 p.m. (Limited to 15 students)


Contemporary Issues Area:

EDUC 377: Multicultural Education

T 1 – 3:30 p.m. (Two sections)

STPEC 394D: They Taught You Wrong (Vincent)

W 3:35 – 6 p.m.


Cultural Expressions Area:

ANTH 234: The Arts in Cross-Cultural Perspective (Pi-Sunyer)

T 6:30 – 9:30 p.m.
Discussion Sections: Wednesdays
9:05 – 9:55 a.m.
10:10 – 11 a.m. (two sections simultaneously)
11:15 – 12:05
12:30 – 1:10 p.m.

PLAN AND SOCIAL SCIENCES

596D: Medicinal Plants (Craker). May be taken for 1 to 6 credits.
(See Professor Craker regarding meeting arrangements.)

N.B. For Five College course offerings visit the Five College Native American Indian Studies Certificate Program web page accessible through our links.

Spring 2005

Mandatory:

ANTH 370: Contemporary Issues in Native America: The Northeast.

Presents Spring 2005 Speaker Series

Thursdays 2:30 -5:00 PM
Place: 204 Tobin

February 17: Jessie Little Doe (Mashpee Wampanoag)
Co-Chair, Wampanoag Language Reclamation Project

March 3: Rae Gould (Nipmuc Nation)
Bringing the Past into the Present: Perspectives of a Native American Archaeologist

March 24: Donna Roberts Moody (Abenaki)

Contemporary Issues of the Abenaki

April 7: Mike Markley (Seaconke Wampanoag)

Re-emergent Tribes

April 28: Muriel Miguel (Kuna/Rappahanock)
Native Representations in Film and Theater

Diversity Area:

HIST 379: History of the American Westward Expansion
Lec. MW 12:20 – 1:10 p.m. Richardson
Disc. F 9:05 – 9:55 a.m.; 10:10 – 11 a.m.; 12:20 – 1:10 p.m.

HIST 397R: Latin American Rebels
TTh 11:15 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Jefferson

ANT 36 [Amherst] Reconsidering the History of Native Peoples in the Pioneer Valley. Th 2 – 4 p.m. Bruchac

ANT 243 [Smith] Indigenous Traditions and Ecology

Contemporary Issues Area:

STPEC 394D: They Taught You Wrong
W 3:35 p.m. – 6 p.m.

Cultural Expressions Area:

ANTH 497B: Native American Languages
W 12:20 – 3:20 p.m. Samuels

ENG 492: Native American Literatures: Four Authors
MW 4 – 5:15 p.m. Welburn
Sherman Alexie, Robert J. Conley, Linda Hogan, Rita Joe

ANT 250 [Smith] Native America Representations
MW 1:10 – 2:30 p.m. M. Carlson

Summer 2004

ANTH 270: North American Indians. Session II, 7/12 – 8/18. T/W/Th 9:30-Noon.

ANTH 577: Field School in Archaeology (Chilton). Variable Session, 6/29-7/31. Tu through Sat, 8 – 5.

HIST 170: Indian Peoples of North America. Session I, 6/1-7/9. T/W/Th 9:30 – Noon.

Spring 2004

Diversity Subject Area

ANTH 270 North American Indians T/Th 9:30 -10:45 AM. (Forward)

ANTH 529: Archaeology of Northeastern North America
T/Th 1 - 2:15 p.m. (Chilton)

ANTH 370:
Contemporary Issues in Indian Country: The Northeast
Th 2:30 - 5:30 p.m.      
Forward, with Vincent et al. Slated guests include Linda Coombs (Aquinnah Wampanoag), Trudie Lamb Richmond (Schaghticoke), and Jean Foggo Simon (St. David's Island, Bermuda Indian community).

ANTH 397B: Andean-Amazonian Spirituality and Biodiversity
Tu 7:30 - 9:45 p.m.    
(B. Thomas (UMass) & F.)

ANTH 397B: Andean-Amazonian Spirituality and Biodiversity Tu 7:30 - 9:45 p.m.     B. Thomas (UMass) & F. Apfflel-Marglin (Smith)

ANTH 529: Archaeology of Northeastern North America TTh 1 - 2:15 p.m.       Chilton

HIST 170:  Native Peoples of North America TTh 4-5:15 p.m. (Stroebel)

Contemporary Issues Subject Area

STPEC 394D: They Taught You Wrong. Herter 201 W 3:35-6 p.m. (Vincent)

Cultural Expressions Subject Area

Special January Term & Spring 2004 Offering:

CILA Institute Programs in Spirituality and Bio-Cultural Diversity
(CILA: Community for Integrative Learning and Action.)
In collaboration with the non-profit community based organization Waman Wasi in the Peruvian High Amazon.

January and Spring Semester Course:

ANTH 397B. CILA Program in Andean-Amazonian Spirituality and Biodiversity (4 credits) Tu 7:30 - 9:45 p.m. Frederique Apffel-Marglin, Prof., Anthropology, Smith College, and Brooke Thomas, Prof., Anthropology, UMass. Contact: fmarglin@smith.edu

This program consists of two parts: 1) a three-week stay in the Waman Wasi community based organization in Lamas, in the Peruvian High Amazon during January interterm and 2) a follow up course work at UMass anthropology department during the Spring semester. The two parts of the course together will consist of a -credit spring semester course. The students will be financially responsible for the Peruvian part of the course. Scholarships may be available to students on financial aid.

Estimated cost of the Peruvian part of the course: $ 2,100. This includes room and board, tuition for Waman Wasi, international and national travel, and ground transportation.

The Waman Wasi community-based organization works with the local indigenous Quechua-Lamista communities to regenerate their forests, their spirits, and their ancestral practices.

COMM 497A: Native American Communication and Culture. T/Th 9:30 - 10:45 Machmer E-(TBA) (Carbaugh).



The Legal Studies courses taught by Professor Peter d'Errico, 460: The Legalization of American Indians, and 470: Indigenous Peoples, Global Issues, will not be offered this year due to Professor d'Errico's retirement. These courses are in the University's regular curriculum, and we hope Legal Studies will have the ability to hire some one who can teach them. Professor d'Errico, meanwhile, is one of those irreplacable faculty.

The Certificate Program salutes him for his nearly thirty years of service to the University of Massachusetts, and thanks him especially for initiating the 460 course back in 1972, for his advocacy of Native peoples' legal and sovereign rights, and for his enormous contributions to Native American Indian Studies on this campus and with the Five College Consortium. We wish him well. Thanks, Peter!!!


Certificate Program in Native American Indian Studies.
Courses: For Summer 2003 and 2003-04

Special Summer Learning Opportunity:
Seven Weeks Summer Internship in the Peruvian High Amazon
Dates: June 2nd to July 18, 2003

Director: Frederique Apffel-Marglin


Internship in the Non-Profit Community Based Organization Waman Wasi, in Lamas, Department of San Martin, Peru.

The CILA summer internship in Peru incorporates the same integrative approach as the course but is less of an intellectual experience and emphasizes a more hands-on experience. There will not be regular classroom teaching. There will be several guest lectures for the students who will mostly be engaged in physical work, interaction with the native community and contemplative practice.

The internship brings an integrative approach to projects of reforestation in an area of severe deforestation of the rain forest. The interns will work with the staff of Waman Wasi and with the native Quechua-Lamista communities with which it works. The interns will work to reforest the lands of the center and work in its fields. The interns will learn traditional crafts and other skills in workshops led by Quechua-Lamista teachers, participate in rituals and other integrative practices. They will spend the last few weeks with individual Quechua-Lamista families, working with them in their chacras and their forest reserves.

Cost of the Program: $ 1,500 for room, board and tuition. This does not cover international and national travel.

Application Deadline: April 15, 2003

Requirements:

A strong interest in indigenous and environmental issues.
A basic ability in conversational Spanish.

Application Procedures:


To be sent either via email or regular mail to:

Prof. Frederique Apffel-Marglin, 27 Belmont Ave, Smith College, Northampton, MA 01063. E-mail: fmarglin@smith.edu

1. A 1 to 2 page letter explaining your qualifications for this internship and your level of Spanish. Include your year, campus, campus address, email and phone as well as home address, phone and email. Include health and dietary restrictions

2. A photocopy of the two first pages of your passport.

3. A letter of recommendation either from a faculty or someone who knows you well, preferably not a relative.


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