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Music History Guest Lecture: Jane Bernstein

Jane Bernstein, Tufts University

“Spectacular Matters and Print Culture: Cavalieri’s Rappresentatione di anima, et di corpo

Description: Of all Italian music editions, Rappresentatione was by far the most innovative and extravagant book printed at that time. It was the first large-scale vocal work issued in full score from movable type and the earliest music edition to include a complete figured bass. Even more significant, Rappresentatione was the first publication to present a blueprint of what makes good music theater, by explaining, in a series of three prefaces, how to stage and perform the work and others like it. This paper will consider this music print from the perspective of its materiality, focusing, in particular, on how the physical appearance of the book and the presentation of its contents served as important tools in publicly broadcasting not only the music and text but also the production and spectacle of Cavalieri’s landmark work.

Jane A. Bernstein is the Austin Fletcher Professor of Music Emerita at Tufts University. She received a B.A. in music from the City College of New York, an M.Mus from the University of Massachusetts, and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. Her primary research interests in musicology center on the Renaissance as well as women's studies. In 1999, she won the Otto Kinkeldey Award from the American Musicological Society for her book, Music Printing in Renaissance Venice: The Scotto Press (1539–1572) and, in 2005, her collection of essays, Women's Voices across Musical Worlds was named a finalist for the Pauline Alderman Award from International Alliance for Women in Music. Her other major publications include Print Culture and Music in Sixteenth-Century Venice, the thirty-volume series The Sixteenth- Century Chanson, Philip Van Wilder: Collected Works, and French Chansons of the Sixteenth Century.

The recipient of several honors, she was awarded in 1990 with the Distinguished Alumna Citation of Excellence from the University of Massachusetts for Outstanding Contributions to the Profession of Musicology. In 2005, she was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and, in 2013, was honored with a Festschrift: Music in Print and Beyond: Hildegard von Bingen to The Beatles, ed. Craig Monson and Roberta Marvin. She served as President of the American Musicological Society in 2008-10 and most recently was elected an honorary member of the Society. She is currently working on a book about music print culture in Renaissance Rome.