Volunteer Opportunities


The Muscle Biology and Imaging Lab at the University of Massachusetts Amherst regularly seeks individuals to participate in research studies. View current volunteer opportunities.

Awards and Honors


View awards and honors received by MBIL graduate students.

MBIL Alumni


Doctoral students from the Muscle Biology and Imaging lab have gone onto prestigious positions at top research institutions across the country. View our alumni.

Department and College


Nina Moore, M.S.

Graduate Research Assistant
(413) 545 6072
camoore@kin.umass.edu

I am in my fourth year as a graduate student in the Muscle Biology and Imaging Lab. I received my Master’s degree in February 2010. For my Master’s project, I worked with primary myoblasts in culture to investigate metallothioneins in skeletal muscle atrophy. In spring 2009 I completed my first human subjects study looking at gene expression of blood components following eccentric (muscle damaging) contractions. I am now coordinator for a study investigating the effects of smoking on skeletal muscle molecular response to eccentric exercise. For my doctoral dissertation, I will focus on how chronic smoking can affect inflammation and inflammatory-mediated signaling pathways in muscle.

I received my Bachelor’s degree in music in 2003, majoring in vocal performance and psychology, and graduated Magna cum laude as part of the first graduating class from the Commonwealth Honors College at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. After three years working in the fitness industry as a group fitness instructor, as a personal trainer, and in management, I returned to UMass as a graduate student in Kinesiology. Although I began my graduate work in Exercise Psychology, exposure to molecular physiology through a Research Assistantship in the MBIL dramatically changed my focus. My fascination with molecular physiology has continued to grow in the four years that I have had the privilege to call the MBIL my home. 

In addition to my research, I have had the pleasure to serve as co-instructor for the Junior Writing class in Kinesiology from 2008-2010.

My passion for molecular physiology is shared with a love of trail running, cycling, and family. During my Master’s studies I have had the joy of bringing two children into this world, Lillian and Kodyn, with whom I hope to instill the same drive and enthusiasm that I have towards science and exercise. 

Presentations

1. Association of AKT2 Genotypes and Exercise Muscle Damage

Moore N, Devaney JM, Hoffman E, Gordish H, Clarkson PM. New England American College of Sports Medicine, Annual Meeting, Providence, RI, November 15, 2007.

2. Association of AKT2 Genotypes and Exercise Muscle Damage

Moore N, Devaney JM, Hoffman E, Zambraski E, Gordish H, Clarkson PM. American College of Sports Medicine, Annual Meeting, Indianapolis, IN, May 28, 2008.

3. Proliferation Rate in Primary Myoblasts Derived from Metallothionein-Null Mice

Moore N, Schwartz LM, Brown CK, Koropatnick J, Clarkson PM. New England American College of Sports Medicine, Annual Meeting, Providence, RI, November 13, 2008.

4. Symposium: A Primer on Methods in Genomic Research

Clarkson PM, Riska KL, Hyldahl R, O’Fallon K, Moore N, Moeckel Cole S. New England American College of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting, Fall 2008 – Providence, RI (Slide presentation)

Abstracts

1. Moore N, Devaney JM, Hoffman E, Zambraski E, Gordish H, Clarkson PM. Association of AKT2 Genotypes and Exercise Muscle Damage. [Abstract] Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2008; 40(5): S32.

Grants/Awards

The Role of Zinc and Metallothioneins During Atrophy

ACSM, NASA Space Physiology Research Grant Initiative, 3/07

Muscle Response Research

Activation of NF-kb in cells outside the myofiber boundary, 3h following eccentric exercise (ECC). A. Confocal images of triple stained 10µm sections from a representative ECC sample for dystrophin (dys=blue), the p-65 subunit of NF-kb (p65=green) and nuclei (topro3=red). White square in merged image denotes the boundaries of the inset image. Scale bar in top 3 images and merged image = 20µm; scale bar in inset image = 10µm. Read the abstract.

Resistance Exercise and Cancer

Dr. Clarkson's research on resistance exercise during breast cancer treatment is featured in Medical Hypothesis, a journal of theoretical papers in the biomedical sciences. Read the abstract.

Rhabdomyolysis

Rhabdomyolysis is a serious, potentially life-threatening condition that can develop unexpectedly under supervised conditions. Dr. Clarkson's 2009 paper in The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research examines a case of rhabdomyolysis in a healthy, fit 18-year-old placekicker following a supervised practice session led by the team's strength and conditioning coach. Following eight days of hospitalization with intravenous fluids, the patient recovered without complications. View the full abstract.