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The newly restored Old Chapel crackled with energy on the morning of November 30, as an over-capacity crowd gathered to hear activist Loretta Ross and public scholar Rickie Solinger reflect on their decades-long collaboration to advance the movement for reproductive justice. The duo offered a frank discussion – punctuated by humor and warmth – about their commitment to work through what might easily have become deep-seated barriers to solidarity between a white historian of the struggle and the Black organizer who founded SisterSong. For the scholar-activist team, authenticity, vulnerability, humbleness and the power to imagine alliances for social justice across racial, class, gender and even international boundaries are all vital to sustaining a productive alliance.

How Scholars and Activists Can Partner for Reproductive and Racial Justice: A Conversation with Loretta Ross and Rickie Solinge
The newly restored Old Chapel crackled with energy on the morning of November 30, as an over-capacity crowd gathered to hear activist Loretta Ross and public scholar Rickie Solinger reflect on their decades-long collaboration to advance the movement for reproductive justice. 
Pathways and Potholes for Women in Science authors

Some sixty members of the University community turned out for the launch of a new volume of research that offers new insights on the realities of women's careers in science. The volume, entitled Pathways, Potholes, and the Persistence of Women in Science: Reconsidering the Pipeline (Lexington Books), is edited by UMass Professor of Sociology and Chancellor's Faculty Advisor for Diversity and Inclusive Excellence  Dr. Enobong (Anna) Branch. With an introduction by Dr. Craig Martin, Professor of Chemistry at UMass Amherst, the panel of three of the volume's authors drew from research across academic and industry science settings to illustrate the supports and constraints that shape women's journeys through careers in science.

Linda Tropp Profile Photo

Linda Tropp (UMass Amherst | Psychological & Brain Sciences) and her co-author Eric Knowles (New York University | Psychology) are making waves with their latest article in The Conversation, an important forum translating social science research for public and policy impact.

In a world where Black Lives Matter I imagine...

The week of March 23-30, 2016 saw an exciting convergence of dialogues and debates across UMass and the Five Colleges, centering on the histories, implications and legacies of Black liberation struggles. The many events sponsored by diverse centers and departments offered and an opportunity to raise the level of our campus’ thought and action in support of the Black Lives Matter movement. The Institute for Social Science Research (ISSR) was pleased to collaborate with the Psychology of Peace and Violence Program (PPVP) to open and close the week’s events with two important conversations exploring how methodological innovation in social science can, and does, offer scholars committed to racial justice a range of pathways for advancing the cause.

Melissa Wooten, Department of Sociology, UMass Amherst

Black colleges are doing great things for their students, so why does a negative view persist? In a recent interview for The Academic MinuteMelissa Wooten, Chair of ISSR's Steering Committee on developing an Undergraduate Research Methods Certificate at UMass Amherst, explores this question.

ISSR is pleased to support the English Department at UMass-Amherst's “Methods Symposium 2016” - to be held Friday, March 11, from 9:30am to 5:30pm. This symposium invites graduate students from across the humanities and social sciences whose work makes methodological interventions in queer, postcolonial, and/or black studies to join prominent scholars in a daylong discussion of the question, “What methods; why now?”

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