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On April 4, the co-PIs presented the final report of a one-year project funded by the National Science Foundation's research program on the Future of Work at Human-Technology Frontiers. The project, Understanding Emerging Technologies, Racial Equity and the Future of Work, convened experts in the social sciences, computational sciences and engineering to articulate the knowledge needed to shape emergent techologies that are equitable and result in "good" jobs for a wider range of workers, and elicited broader stakeholder feedback on this academic conversation.  

View the report here.

This fall, UMass Amherst was awarded a National Science Foundation ADVANCE Institutional Transformation Grant to develop systemic and sustainable approaches to advance gender equity (including dynamics at the intersection of race and gender) and promote gender equity in ways that involve women and men.  In order to inform our efforts, we need to hear from you. 

On 17 October, David Snow, a Distinguished Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Irvine engaged a packed house at the ISSR lab. Snow lectured on the relationship between right-wing populism and the construction of superfluous populations, drawing from his recent chapter on the topic in Mackert et al’s edited volume Populism and the Crisis of Democracy (Routledge, 2018).

Donald Tomaskovic-Devey

New research from colleagues at the Center for Employment Equity (CEE) finds that while white and Asian men dominate the workforces of the largest Silicon Valley Tech firms, there are companies among their ranks that demonstrate achieving diversity in their workforces is currently possible.

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An interdisciplinary UMass team led by ISSR Director Laurel Smith-Doerr (PI) and Co-PIs Enobong (Anna) Branch, Shlomo Zilberstein, Henry Renski, and Shannon Roberts has received a National Science Foundation conference grant funded under one of the NSF Ten Big Ideas—the Future of Work at Human-Technology Frontiers (HTF). On April 5-6th, the Institute for Social Science Research convened renowned social scientists, computer scientists, engineers and influential professionals from across the U.S. for the second of three meetings funded by this grant, to consider the question of racial equity in how scholars understand emerging technologies and the workplace.

Registration is open for the 2nd Annual Boston-Wide Women of Color in the Academy Conference: Concrete Steps to Career Success and Advancement!  The conference will be in the Curry Student Center at Northeastern University on Friday, April 27, 2018 from 8:30 am - 6:30 pm.

The newly restored Old Chapel crackled with energy on the morning of November 30, as an over-capacity crowd gathered to hear activist Loretta Ross and public scholar Rickie Solinger reflect on their decades-long collaboration to advance the movement for reproductive justice. The duo offered a frank discussion – punctuated by humor and warmth – about their commitment to work through what might easily have become deep-seated barriers to solidarity between a white historian of the struggle and the Black organizer who founded SisterSong. For the scholar-activist team, authenticity, vulnerability, humbleness and the power to imagine alliances for social justice across racial, class, gender and even international boundaries are all vital to sustaining a productive alliance.

How Scholars and Activists Can Partner for Reproductive and Racial Justice: A Conversation with Loretta Ross and Rickie Solinge
The newly restored Old Chapel crackled with energy on the morning of November 30, as an over-capacity crowd gathered to hear activist Loretta Ross and public scholar Rickie Solinger reflect on their decades-long collaboration to advance the movement for reproductive justice. 
Pathways and Potholes for Women in Science authors

Some sixty members of the University community turned out for the launch of a new volume of research that offers new insights on the realities of women's careers in science. The volume, entitled Pathways, Potholes, and the Persistence of Women in Science: Reconsidering the Pipeline (Lexington Books), is edited by UMass Professor of Sociology and Chancellor's Faculty Advisor for Diversity and Inclusive Excellence  Dr. Enobong (Anna) Branch. With an introduction by Dr. Craig Martin, Professor of Chemistry at UMass Amherst, the panel of three of the volume's authors drew from research across academic and industry science settings to illustrate the supports and constraints that shape women's journeys through careers in science.

Linda Tropp Profile Photo

Linda Tropp (UMass Amherst | Psychological & Brain Sciences) and her co-author Eric Knowles (New York University | Psychology) are making waves with their latest article in The Conversation, an important forum translating social science research for public and policy impact.

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