achievements

Laura Doyle and Team Awarded Mellon Foundation's Sawyer Grant

Laura Doyle, former ISHA 'Migrations' fellow, is part of a UMass faculty team awarded the prestigious Mellon Foundation's Sawyer Grant for their project, “Beyond Medieval and Modern: Rethinking Global Paradigms of Political Economy and Culture.”

This is the first time that UMass has received this grant, which will fund a postdoctoral graduate fellow and award two dissertation writing fellowships, and convene a series of seminar meetings on their topic. During academic year 2015-16, the seminar team will host leading scholars from the U.S. and abroad who bring a long-historical, global and postcolonial orientation to their research.

Other members of the team include Mwangi wa Gĩthĩnji from Economics, Joselyn Almeida Beveridge from English, Annette Damayanti Lienau from Comparative Literature and Honors College, and Johan Mathews from Economics and History. UMass's press release can be found here, and the Hampshire Gazette's coverage here.

Max Page Completes Tenure as Rome Prize Fellow

Current ISI 'Value' fellow Max Page completed his tenure as a Rome Prize Fellow at the American Academy in Rome. Awarded annually by the American Academy in Rome to about 30 scholars in diverse fields, the prize includes a two-year stipend plus room and board on the Academy's 11-acre campus. Page was in Rome from January to July, during which he kept a blog of more than 200 entries, including photos and observations.

Page researched the way the era of Mussolini is remembered, memorialized, and marked on the physical places of Rome, and his interview with the American Academy in Rome about his work can be found here. Upon returning to Massachusetts, Page published an article in the Boston Globe, "The Roman Architecture of Mussolini, Still Standing."

ISI Fellow Rebecca Lorimer Leonard Receives Promising Researcher Award

The National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) recognized current ISI Fellow Rebecca Lorimer Leonard with the Promising Researcher Award. The Award recognizes early scholarship that shows promise in influencing the direction of English Studies. Of Lorimer Leonard's work, the committee writes, "Dr. Leonard’s paper takes research in multilingual literacies to a new level by critiquing the romanticizing of 'literacies on the move' and suggesting that educators need to 'leverage' linguistic histories to 'better support multilingual writers' as they adjust dispositions toward language norms and build meta-awareness about their moves within and across languages. This is a much needed piece that addresses the needs of teacher educators—as well as researchers and practitioners in English education, literacy studies, rhetoric, sociolinguistics, and linguistic anthropology--all of whom will gain invaluable insight from Dr. Leonard’s critical analysis."

The announcement as well as a full list of past recipients can be found here

Gubrium's "Hear Our Stories" Project Launches

ISI Fellow Aline Gubrium is the lead PI for "Hear Our Stories: Diasporic Youth for Sexual Rights and Justice." The research project, funded by the Ford Foundation, is comprised of digital stories told by young mothers enrolled at the Community Adolescent Resources and Education (CARE) Center of Holyoke. Interviewed by New England Public Radio, Gubrium explains that the project helps to "put a face on human policy," and that "[d]igital story telling is a great way to do it. It is shore, captures peoples' attention. It shows the young women in these stories as people getting by in their lives just like everybody else."

The stores were shown for the first time in Holyoke, and subsequent showings are planned for New York City and Boston. Find NePR's coverage here, and a YouTube video about the project here.

Moon Receives Guggenheim Fellowship

Former ISHA Fellow Young Min Moon has been selected to receive a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship. Moon, an associate professor of studio art at UMass was one of 178 scholars, artists, and scientists in the United States and Canada to be chosen from a group of almost 3,000 applicants on the basis of "prior achievement and exceptional promise." Moon’s practice of art and art criticism are informed by his experience of migration across cultures and hybridized nature of identities in the context of the historical and political relationship between modern Asia and North America. More information about the artist and the award can be found here.

ISI Fellow Mednicoff Receives ZiF Fellowship

Current ISI Fellow David Mednicoff has been invited to be a fellow for a research group on Balancing Religious Accommodation and Human Rights and Human Rights in Constitutional Frameworks. He will be working on his book on the rule of law and religious politics in cross-national Arab perspective, as well as a related law review article and book chapter.

The ZiF is Bielefeld University's Institute for Advanced Study, and fosters outstanding and innovative interdisciplinary research projects, which it selects through a highly competitive application process. A statement of the theme of the fellowship work group can be found here. A list of the members of the work group including Mednicoff, can be found here.

Henderson Book is Finalist for Lambda Literary Award

Former ISI Fellow Lisa Henderson's book Love and Money: Queers, Class, and Cultural Production (NYU 2013), one chapter of which was developed in an ISHA seminar, is a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award in the category of LGBT Studies. Finalists for the awards were announced in early March by the Lambda Literary Foundation. The Lambda Literary Awards celebrate achievement in lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) writing for books published in 2013. The winners will be announced at a ceremony on June 2 at Cooper Union in New York City.

More information about the award can be found here.

2013 Report on Research Highlights ISI

The 2013 University of Massachusetts Amherst Report on Research highlights the Interdisciplinary Studies Institute (ISI) in "Crossing Boundaries: Interdisciplinary Studies' Intellectual Adventure". The annual Report on Research is a report on the campus's achievements in research, scholarship, and creative activity by the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research and Engagement.

The report celebrate's the ISI's promotion to a full-fledged institute, notes the publication of its first book, and features commentary from ISI fellows past and present. The full report on the ISI can be found here.

Review of 'Negotiating Culture' in March 2014 issue of CHOICE

A review in the March 2014 issue of CHOICE "highly recommends" the volume Negotiating Culture: Heritage, Ownership, and Intellectual Property, edited by Laetitia La Follette. CHOICE is a publication of the Association of College and Research Libraries.

Negotiating Culture examines issues of cultural heritage and intellectual property in a variety of contexts, from contests over tangible artifacts to more abstract forms of culture such as language and oral traditions. This edited volume originates from the productive discussions of the ISI faculty seminars. More information about the book from the University of Massachusetts Press can be found here.

Krauthamer Book Wins NAACP Image Award

Current ISI Fellow Barbara Krauthamer's book with photographic historian Deborah Willis Envisioning Emancipation: Black Americans and the End of Slavery won the 45th Annual NAACP Image Award in the category of non-fiction. The awards, presented in 35 categories in literature, motion pictures, recording, documentary, writing and directing, were televised live Feb. 22 from Pasadena, Calif.  The awards celebrate the achievements of people of color in the arts and the promotion of social justice through creative endeavors.

Envisioning Emancipation illustrates what freedom looked like for black Americans in the Civil War era. From photos of the enslaved on plantations and African-American soldiers and camp workers in the Union Army to Juneteenth celebrations, slave reunions, and portraits of black families and workers in the American South, the images in this book challenge perceptions of slavery. They show not only what the subjects emphasized about themselves but also the ways Americans of all colors and genders opposed slavery and marked its end. Krauthamer and Willis amassed 150 photographs—some never before published—from the antebellum days of the 1850s through the New Deal era of the 1930s.

More information about Krauthamer's award can be found here.

 

Pages