Seminars

ISI seminars run for a year, and are organized around specific themes. Fellows alternate in leading the discussion, pursuing a particular project in which they are interested. Though the theme is common to all, fellows inevitably approach it from their own points of view and disciplinary perspectives. The result is an interdisciplinary exchange which provides intellectual stimulation and furthers the individual and collaborative work of all concerned. The basis for discussion may be a formal or informal presentation; a set of readings (or images, or music); a piece of writing or work of art composed by the presenter(s); or some combination. The ethos is democratic and interactive, allowing for free-flowing discussion and stimulation. Below you will find a description of our current seminar, as well as a list of the Fellows and their projects.

2018-19 Faculty and Graduate Student Fellows

This year, ISI has eight faculty members and seven graduate students members as its incoming fellows for seminars on the theme of 'Bias.' Over the course of the academic year, the fellows will approach the seminar’s theme of ‘Bias’ from a variety of perspectives in the social sciences and humanities. The fellows receive a generous research allowance, and will be participating in our yearlong faculty seminar. 

The 2018-2019 Faculty Fellows are:
Yuriy Brun, Information and Computer Sciences, "Bias in Software Systems"
Brian Dillon, Linguistics, "The Role of Implicit Bias in Guiding Language Processing"
Haivan Hoang, English, "Exploring Racial Bias in Write Across the Curriculum Programs"
Augustin Lao-Montes, Sociology, "Entangled Discriminations/Intertwined Policies: Trans-American Perspectives"
Eliot Moss, Information and Computer Sciences, "The Extent to Which Bias, or Lack of Bias, Is 'Encoded' in Statistical Formulae and Alogrithmic Tests" 
Brian Ogilvie, History, "Bias in Science and the History of Science: Charismatic, Ugly, and Marginally Perceptible Creatures"
Banu Subramanian, Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, "De-Colonizing Botany: Un-biasing Vegetal Knowledges"
Linda Tropp, Psychological and Brain Sciences, "How Diversity and Contact Shape Trust: A Multi-Disciplinary Investigation Among Immigration and U.S.-Born Groups"

The Graduate Student Fellows are:
Alice Fiddian-Green, Public Health and Health Sciences, "Critical Turning Points and Opioid Use Trajectories Among Pregnant and Parenting Women"
Kelly Giles, Sociology, "What's Love Got To Do With It?: Understanding Black Women and Their Road to Intimacy, Love, and Marriage During Mid-Adulthood"
Christopher Hammerly, Linguistics, "Response Bias and Decision Models in Linguistic Grammaticality Judgements"
Safi Shams, Sociology, "The Social Form of Economic Rent: The Embeddedness of Contractual Agreements Between Firms" 
Thakshala Tissera, English, "Grammar Errors and Instructor Bias in the Writing Classroom"
Porntip Twishime, Communication, "Asian American Heritage Seeking: Personal Narrative Performances of Ancestral Return"
Aaron Yates, Sociology, "The Shape of 'Modern' Sociological Theory: The Institutionalization of Eurocentric Modernity in American Sociology"

We welcome this year’s fellows, and look forward to many engaging and intellectually stimulating meetings in the coming academic year!