Past Programs & Events

Jan 31, 2018

Empathy and the Task of the Historian in the Face of Genocide

Information is forthcoming.  


Dec 6, 2017

MARTIN BUBER AND HIS INDESTRUCTIBLE LOVE FOR GERMANY

Martin Buber (1878-1965) was born in Vienna, grew up in Galicia, and spent the last twenty-seven years of his life in Palestine/Israel, but as in the case of many other central-European Jews, he had a passionate love and admiration of Germanness. Dr. Zohar Maor's lecture will explore some of the key-moments in Buber’s life-long romance with what he considered German character, spirit and culture.  Even during the darkest of days Buber never lost his faith in the true German spirit and he hoped that the German Jews would save it and re-plant it in their new homeland, Israel. During this talk Maor will focus espeically on Buber’s theological and sociological account of the Holocaust, as a staggering demonstration of his indestructible love for Germany.

SPEAKER:  Dr. Zohar Maor lectures on modern history at Bar-Ilan University and Herzog College (Israel), and he is currently a visiting scholar at the department of History in UCLA. His publications include The Hebrew Biography of Martin Buber (2016), and articles on German-Jewish intellectuals, such as Hans Kohn, Franz Rosenzweig, and Gershom Scholem.


Dec 5, 2017

HOLOCAUST MEMORY REFRAMED: MUSEUMS AND THE CHALLENGES OF REPRESENTATION

During this presentation, Jennifer Hansen-Glucklich will discuss ways in which three museums commemorate the Holocaust – Yad Vashem in Jerusalem; the Jewish Museum Berlin; and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC. Hansen-Glucklich will discuss the use of aesthetic, spatial, and ritual techniques which communicate the significance of the Holocaust within specific national and cultural contexts.  She will also show how these museums create specific Holocaust narratives and rituals of remembrance that reflect the civil religions of their host cultures. She will also demonste the variety and vividness of museal presentation forms, including photography exhibits, memorials, architecture, and video art displays. 

THIS TALK WILL BE HELD IN HERTER 227.


Nov 14, 2017

SISTERS OF THE RESISTANCE: AMERICAN WOMEN WHO JOINED THE FRENCH RESISTANCE

Alex Kershaw

On 15 August 1944, just ten days before Paris was liberated, three remarkable women, listed as American citizens by the Gestapo, were deported from Paris along with dozens of French men and women belonging to the creme de la creme of the French resistance: Toquette Jackson, wife of American doctor Sumner Jackson; Lucienne Dixon, who had worked at the Elizabeth Arden salon; and Virginia d'Albert-Lake, a 24-year-old from Dayton, Ohio. All three had risked everything to defeat Nazism. All three would help each other survive the unimaginable hell of Hitler's concentration camps as the Third Reich collapsed around them.    
THIS PROGRAM IS CO-SPONSORED BY FRENCH AND FRANCOPHONE STUDIES AND THE DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY


Oct 26, 2017

TAMID KADIMA: ZIONISM IN JEWISH DP CAMPS IN POST-WWII GERMANY

This presentation will examine the role of networks in DP camps and in the clandestine immigration activities to bring thousands of Jews from post-WWII Europe to Israel. Most Jewish displaced persons (DPs) in post-WWII Europe longed to be reunited with family anywhere in the world, but a strong Zionist influence in DP camps contributed to the desire of building a Jewish homeland in Eretz Israel.  The restrictive immigration policies of the British government for Palestine that had been in effect since the 1939 White Paper remained in place after the war. These policies, as well as the forced return of the Exodus 1947 passengers to Germany, caused mass protests in many DP camps and contributed to a temporary decline in morale amongst the Jewish DP population. To alleviate this untenable situation and give hope to the Jewish DPs, the clandestine immigration to Palestine that had existed since before WWII was reinvigorated. The Mossad Aljah Bet, which coordinated most of the clandestine immigration activities before the war, became instrumental in organizing an underground network, the Brichah after the war. The Brichah activists, most of them members of the Zionist youth movement, had quickly established escape routes throughout Europe after the war. Between 150,000 and 200,000 Jews embarked on the risky endeavor of escaping Europe by crossing borders without proper papers, often in the middle of the night, by hiking though mountains in the heat or in the snow, and then boarding ships that crossed the Mediterranean without authorization.

 
Uta Larkey is Associate Professor at Goucher College in Baltimore, Maryland. Her research and scholarship in Holocaust Studies has earned her several prestigious fellowships and culminated in publications. As a Scholar-in-Residence at the Hadassah Brandeis Institute, she contributed to the project entitled Families, Children and the Holocaust. Her book chapter related to this is included in the edited volume Jewish Families in Europe 1939-Present (2017). She was a Fellow-in-Residence at the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies at USHMM, working on her research project Narrating Horror: Language and Identity in Early Postwar German-Language Interviews and Testimonies. Uta Larkey’s co-authored book Life and Loss in the Shadow of the Holocaust: A Jewish Family's Untold Story (2011) was translated into Portuguese and published in Brazil. 


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