Upcoming Programs & Events

Wednesday, September 21, 2016 - 4:30pm

Defined Out of Existence: The U.S. Government's Continuing Attempt to Remove and Replace American Indians

From first contact, those who arrived in what is now known as the United States, have used diverse methods to decrease the number of peoples indigenous to the land. First, physical elimination via war and smallpox was the most expedient method. After the formation of the U.S. government, federal policies were enacted to eliminate American Indians using more politically correct means. The policies varied in name and effectiveness, and included removal, relocation, assimilation, reservations, and more. Today's policy era is known as Self-determination, but, in reality, includes the U.S. government taking control over the definitions of "Indian" and "tribe." This is the modern, most politically correct means of decreasing the number of Indigenous peoples who remain on the this land. Sadly, it has been quite effective, but reminds us that nothing has changed since 1492 and the desire to remove and replace American Indians from this land.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Kathleen Brown-Perez is a Senior Lecturer in the Honors College at UMass Amherst. Among other courses, she teaches federal Indian law and policy as well as Criminal Law, which includes a section on criminal jurisdiction in Indian Country. Kathleen is a graduate of the University of Iowa, having received her MBA and JD there. She joined the faculty in Commonwealth Honors College after working as a corporate lawyer in Boston. She now limits her practice to federal Indian law, providing consultation services to law firms suing the U.S. government on behalf of tribes. Kathleen is an enrolled member of the Eeyam Quittoowauconuck (Brothertown Indian Nation, Wisconsin). Her publications include books and articles on federal Indian law, administrative law, and labor/employment law. In addition to writing, she has extensive editing experience, having served on the inaugural editorial board of the Native American and Indigenous Studies journal.

 


Wednesday, October 5, 2016 - 5:00pm

The Making of the Secular Witness: From David Rousset to the "Survivor"

This talk will explore one chapter in the history of a particular concept of humanity forged in suffering and survival, symbolized by the secular witness.  It discusses the defamation trial of French writer David Rousset (author of "The Concentrationary Universe," or "L'Univers concentrationnaire), which became shorthand for camp life in the decade after the Second World War.  It addresses how he used the trial to generate a victim-entered testimonial practice only fully developed after the Eichmann trial.  The paper will summarize the features and history of the survivor icon conceived as part of the historical development of contemporary moral culture.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Carolyn J. Dean is Charles J. Stille Professor of History and French at Yale University and the author of five books, most recently Aversion and Erasure: The Fate of the Victim after the Holocaust (Cornell, 2010).


Tuesday, November 1, 2016 - 6:30pm

Last Yiddish Heroes: Lost and Found Songs of Soviet Jews during World War II

During and just after World War II, folklorist Moshe Beregovsky and the Kiev Cabinet for Jewish Culture collected original Yiddish songs written by Soviet Jews. But in 1949, the Soviet government confiscated and hid away the songs. In this all-new concert and lecture program, singer-songwriter Psoy Korolenko and historian Anna Shternshis bring these lost Yiddish songs to life and share the incredible stories behind these treasures.
 
PSOY KOROLENKO AND ANNA SHTERNSHIS
 
 

Pavel Lion, a.k.a. Psoy Korolenko, is one of Russia’s most popular – and clever – songwriters, as well as a pre-eminent Yiddish singer. He is a Moscow based singer/songwriter, translator, scholar and journalist. Self-referred to as a ''wandering scholar'' and an ''avant-bard'', he is know for his multilingual one-person cabaret-esque shows, which balance folk and klezmer music, free-style poetry and intellectual comedy. Psoy writes and sings in English, Russian, Yiddish, and French. On stage since 2000, he has published one book of selected essays and song lyrics ''The Hit Of The Century'', and 14 CDs – some of them in collaboration with active Jewish and Klezmer musicians ("Opa!", Daniel Kahn, Igor Krutogolov, "Oy Division").  Psoy is a member of the organizing committee for a Russian American music festival JetLAG, a guest of many klezmer music festivals, and an ex-artist in residence at the Trinity College (Hartford), University of Michigan (Ann Arbor), Dickinson College (Carlisle, PA). An author of insightful and sophisticated Russian sung poetry, Psoy is also known for his keen and explorative vision of the art of translation, “tradaptation” and what he calls Spell-Art (i.e. playing with foreign text, emphasizing linguistic distances, multilingual songs etc).

Anna Shternshis holds the position of Al and Malka Green Associate Professor of Yiddish studies at the University of Toronto. She is also the Director of the Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies at the University of Toronto. She received her doctoral degree (D.Phil) in Modern Languages and Literatures from Oxford University in 2001.  Shternshis is the author of Soviet and Kosher: Jewish Popular Culture in the Soviet Union, 1923 - 1939 (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2006). Her second book entitled When Sonia Met Boris: Jewish Daily Life in Soviet Russia is forthcoming from Oxford University Press in 2017. She is currently working on the book-length study of evacuation and escape of Soviet Jews during World War II. She is the author of twenty articles on topics of Russian Jewish culture and post-Soviet Jewish diaspora. Shternshis is a co-editor-in-chief of East European Jewish Affairs.

 
THIS PROGRAM IS CO-SPONSORED BY THE NATIONAL YIDDISH BOOK CENTER AND WILL BE HELD IN ITS CONCERT HALL. 

 


Wednesday, November 30, 2016 - 12:15pm

Zionism, Holocaust Survivors, and the Creation of Israel

Avinoam Patt


Thursday, February 2, 2017 - 5:00pm

In Those Nightmarish Days: Ghetto Reportage as Witnessing

Samuel Kassow


Wednesday, March 8, 2017 - 5:00pm

'A Rubric of Pain Words': Holocaust Yiddish Glossaries and Postwar Language Work

Hannah Pollin-Galay

 


Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 4:00pm

Mitch Duneier

Ghetto: The Invention of a Place, the History of an Idea

Information is forthcoming.  


Thursday, April 6, 2017 - 5:00pm

Musar after the Holocaust: Rabbi Eliyahu Dessler and the Rebuilding of Jewish Pietism

R. Eliyahu Dessler (d.1953) was arguably the most prominent proponent of the classical musar tradition to survive the Holocaust. He spent the war years in England where he moved from Lithuania to accompany his father for medical treatment. During the inter-war years, Dessler served as a dean of the Manchester Yeshiva where he trained many boys and young men who were part of the Kindertransports. After the war he immigrated to Mandate Palestine where he served as a spiritual mentor of the Ponovitsch Yeshiva in Bnei Brak until his death in 1953. This lecture will explore Dessler’s teachings, collected in the 5 volume Mikhtav M’Eliyahu, as an example of one who sought to reconstruct the ideology of musar with emphasis on its teachings as a response to the Holocaust. While not normally thought of as a post-Holocaust thinker, I will argue that Dessler’s musar is not simply a reiteration of pre-war musar but is a tool to teach his readers how to react to the theological challenges of the Holocaust.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Shaul Magid is the Jay and Jeanie Schotenstein Professor of Jewish Studies at Indiana University. He is also a Kogod Senior Research Fellow at The Shalom Hartman Institute in NYC. His work deals with the tradition and Jewish theology and philosophy from the early modern period to the present. His most recent book is *Hasidism Incarnate: Hasidism, Christianity, and the Construction of Modern Judaism* published with Stanford University Press. His forthcoming book *The Jewish Jesus of Volozhin: Elijah Zvi Soloveitchik's Commentary to the New testament* will be published by Yale University Press.


Monday, April 24, 2017 - 5:00pm

Race and Photography: Racial Photography as Scientific Evidence, 1876-1980

Amos Morris-Reich

Information is forthcoming.