Upcoming Programs & Events

Tuesday, December 5, 2017 - 2:30pm

HOLOCAUST MEMORY REFRAMED: MUSEUMS AND THE CHALLENGES OF REPRESENTATION

During this presentation, Jennifer Hansen-Glucklich will discuss ways in which three museums commemorate the Holocaust – Yad Vashem in Jerusalem; the Jewish Museum Berlin; and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC. Hansen-Glucklich will discuss the use of aesthetic, spatial, and ritual techniques which communicate the significance of the Holocaust within specific national and cultural contexts.  She will also show how these museums create specific Holocaust narratives and rituals of remembrance that reflect the civil religions of their host cultures. She will also demonste the variety and vividness of museal presentation forms, including photography exhibits, memorials, architecture, and video art displays. 

THIS TALK WILL BE HELD IN HERTER 227.


Wednesday, December 6, 2017 - 5:00pm

MARTIN BUBER AND HIS INDESTRUCTIBLE LOVE FOR GERMANY

Martin Buber (1878-1965) was born in Vienna, grew up in Galicia, and spent the last twenty-seven years of his life in Palestine/Israel, but as in the case of many other central-European Jews, he had a passionate love and admiration of Germanness. Dr. Zohar Maor's lecture will explore some of the key-moments in Buber’s life-long romance with what he considered German character, spirit and culture.  Even during the darkest of days Buber never lost his faith in the true German spirit and he hoped that the German Jews would save it and re-plant it in their new homeland, Israel. During this talk Maor will focus espeically on Buber’s theological and sociological account of the Holocaust, as a staggering demonstration of his indestructible love for Germany.

SPEAKER:  Dr. Zohar Maor lectures on modern history at Bar-Ilan University and Herzog College (Israel), and he is currently a visiting scholar at the department of History in UCLA. His publications include The Hebrew Biography of Martin Buber (2016), and articles on German-Jewish intellectuals, such as Hans Kohn, Franz Rosenzweig, and Gershom Scholem.


Friday, December 15, 2017 - 2:00pm

THE EPISTEMOLOGICAL GREY ZONE: JEWS AND NAZIS IN CHAIM KAPLAN'S WARSAW DIARY

This talk explores Warsaw diarist Chaim Kaplan's ambivalent attitude toward the Nazis.  On 18 May, 1941, Kaplan  wrote: "Nazism came to annihilate us. It is the enemy of Judaism in its spirit and in its practice. We fight it and await its defeat. However—the human spirit is inexplicable. Unconsciously, we accept its ideology and follow in its ways. Nazism has conquered our entire world. It severely damages our public life. And yet we do not cease to declare day and night that it is ugliness and that one ought to distance oneself from it." For Kaplan, the Nazis were at one and the same time the most vicious external enemy and a kind of unconscious role-model that the Warsaw Ghetto Jewish society somehow internalized and imitated. This hermeneutical framework for understanding Jewish Warsaw under Nazi occupation is anything but unique to Kaplan, though few Jewish writers articulated this as sharply as he did. Professor Amos Goldberg refers to the phenomenon that Kaplan embodies "the epistemological grey zone." 

SPEAKER:  Professor Amos Goldberg is the chair of the Department of Jewish History and Contemporary Jewry at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. His main field of research is Holocaust history and memory. Among his publications are: Trauma in First Person: Diary Writing During the Holocaust, Indiana University Press 2017; and the volume that he edited with Bashir Bashir, entitled The Nakba and the Holocaust: Memory, National Identity and Jewish Arab Partnership (Hebrew) 2015.   

 

Thursday, March 8, 2018 - 4:00pm

IN SEARCH OF SUCHOMEL IN CLAUDE LANZMANN'S SHOAH: CONSTRUCTING THE HOLOCAUST PERPETRATOR BETWEEN THE OUTTAKES AND THE FINISHED FILM


Tuesday, March 20, 2018 - 4:30pm

ON HOLOCAUST MEMORY, FAMILY, AND EMPATHY


Thursday, March 22, 2018 - 5:00pm

THE MANY DEATHS OF JEW SÜSS: THE NOTORIOUS TRIAL AND EXECUTION OF AN EIGHTEENTH CENTURY COURT JEW

Joseph Süss Oppenheimer, also known as "Jew Süss," is one of the most iconic figures in the history of anti-Semitism. In 1733, Oppenheimer became the "court Jew" of the duke of the small German state of Württemberg. When his patron the duke died unexpectedly four years later, local authorities arrested Oppenheimer, put him on trial, and eventually hanged him in front of a large crowd just outside Stuttgart. He is most often remembered today through a vicious Nazi propaganda movie made about him in 1940 at the behest of Joseph Goebbels.  In this talk, Professor Yair Mintzker will discuss his compelling new account of Oppenheimer's notorious trial, the unusual method he adopted in writing it, and the relevance of the story of "Jew Süss" in modern America.

SPEAKER:  Professor Yair Mintzker is the author of The Defortification of the German City, 1689-1866 (2012), which tells the story of the metamorphosis of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century German cities from walled to defortified (open) places. His second book, The Many Deaths of Jew Süss (2017), is a retelling of the trial and execution of Joseph Süss Oppenheimer, the notorious “Jew Süss.”


Tuesday, April 24, 2018 - 5:00pm

THE ORIGINAL SIN OF EUROPE'S DARK TWENTIETH CENTURY: (RE) INTEGRATING THE ARMENIAN GENOCIDE INTO EUROPEAN AND WORLD HISTORY