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September 2017

This collaboration provides UMass Amherst nursing students access to new technologies to supplement their education, and it expands clinical simulations at the university. In addition, UMass Amherst and Spacelabs will share resources for targeted initiatives supporting research, learning and healthcare advancements.

Join us to:

Meet with Johnson & Johnson Innovation
Tour UMass Amherst Core Facilities

 

Thursday, October 12, 2017 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
3rd Floor Life Science Laboratories, 240 Thatcher Road
University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003

Trisha Andrew, chemistry and CPHM, and colleagues describe, in a new paper in Applied Materials & Interfaces, how they use a vapor deposition method for nano-coating fabric to create sewable, weavable, electrically heated material. The demonstration glove they made can keep fingers toasty for up to eight hours.

The authors point out, “Lightweight, breathable and body-conformable electrical heaters have the potential to change traditional approaches to personal thermal management, medical heat therapy, joint pain relief and athletic rehabilitation.”

Neuroscientist Rebecca Spencer, psychology and brain sciences and CPHM, received a five-year, $2.64 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to explore, in a series of laboratory and preschool-based studies, whether mid-day napping benefits learning in young children and helps them cope with emotions. Stating that improving early education can enhance child development and school readiness, factors that are known to have lifelong effects on physical and mental health.

Rosie Cowell and David Huber, CPHM and Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, have been awarded a $2.4 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop a mathematical model of the blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) signal measured with fMRI. The project includes collaborators from UC San Diego and MIT. The funded research seeks to bridge across different scales of neurobiological mechanism, by providing a tool that neuroscientists can use to understand more about neural-level mechanisms from fMRI data than is currently possible.